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Detecting colon cancer early with artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

NORFOLK, Va. - News 3 is taking action for your health! March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Be aware - the Hampton Roads area was identified as a "hot spot" for colon cancer deaths, according to the American Cancer Society. In Norfolk, a trial is currently underway, adding the tool of artificial intelligence in the quest for prevention. As the video indicates, AI technology is like an extra set of eyes; it highlights areas of interest when a patient undergoes a colonoscopy.


'I couldn't be with someone who liked Jack Reacher': can our taste in books help us find love?

The Guardian

"He mentioned in his bio that he liked Virginia Woolf and I was like, 'Ah! The dream boy," says Francesca, 34, who met her boyfriend Andy on Tinder. They spent two years as friends, exchanging books and chatting about Mrs Dalloway, until one day Francesca had a revelation during lockdown: "I was like, I miss you so much – I think I love you," she says. Andy gave her an illustrated collection of love letters between Woolf and her lover Vita Sackville-West: "If there's anything that inspired our relationship it would be a lesbian love story from the 1930s," she says. Last year, they went to Hampton Court for "a Vita and Virginia date," she says.


Beyond screens

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

You might not know this, but the metaverse is coming. Where you can live a life that expands on reality and can approach hyperrealism. I just took my next big step toward embracing it – and soon you may, too. Within a matter of minutes, I was reborn as a holographic avatar – a digital version of me – with the help of the Avatar Dimension technicians in northern Virginia, just west of the nation's capital. My virtual doppelgänger is ready to embark on digital adventures, be inserted into a video game, a movie, or virtual reality. And it's ready for the metaverse, the persistent alternate reality in cyberspace author Neal Stephenson envisioned in his 1992 science fiction novel "Snow Crash."


Staggering approval for Alphabet drone among early customers

ZDNet

Since October 2019, Alphabet's Wing has operated a drone delivery service five days per week in the tiny hamlet of Christiansburg, Virginia; a community of just over 20,000. The early testbed has been one to watch for a delivery drone sector that's just emerging from in a slowly evolving regulatory regime. Key to the future of drone delivery is positive consumer sentiment. So how do the people of Christiansburg feel about the delivery drone service that's made their community one of a small number of canaries in the coal mine for the consumer drone sector? In short, they love it.


Virginia Girl Scouts are using a drone delivery service to dispatch cookies

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. Girl Scouts in Virginia are going high tech when it comes to delivering their seasonal cookies. According to Google's drone delivery company Wing, a local troop in the town of Christiansburg has been using its service to test cookie dispatch. Girl Scouts Alice Goerlich (right) and Gracie Walker (left) pose with a Wing delivery drone in Christiansburg, Va. on April 14, 2021.


From Minecraft to Zoom calls, we've all spent much of the pandemic on our screens. But are we ready for the metaverse?

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

You might not know this, but the metaverse is coming. Where you can live a life that expands on reality and can approach hyperrealism. I just took my next big step toward embracing it – and soon you may, too. Within a matter of minutes, I was reborn as a holographic avatar – a digital version of me – with the help of the Avatar Dimension technicians in northern Virginia, just west of the nation's capital. My virtual doppelgänger is ready to embark on digital adventures, be inserted into a video game, a movie or virtual reality. And it's ready for the metaverse, the persistent alternate reality in cyberspace author Neal Stephenson envisioned in his 1992 science fiction novel "Snow Crash."


Startup taps radio frequency data, AWS tools to search the seas for pirates

ZDNet

What is AI? Everything you need to know about Artificial Intelligence On the open ocean, identifying vessels can be challenging. Governments and maritime insurers use the Automatic Identification System (AIS) to identify ships, but bad actors can easily "go dark." If a ship has deactivated its AIS beacons, there's a chance it could be involved in smuggling, piracy, illegal fishing or human trafficking. Hawkeye 360 is a data analytics company that aims to address this challenge using space-based radio frequency (RF) mapping. The six year-old company, headquartered in Herndon, Virginia, operates a constellation of commercial satellites to detect, characterize and geolocate a broad range of RF signals.


Spring Oaks Capital Continues its Rapid Expansion with the Addition of Paul Hurlocker as Chief Technology Officer

#artificialintelligence

Spring Oaks Capital, LLC has hired Paul Hurlocker as Chief Technology Officer. Paul will be based in Richmond, Virginia, and report to President & CEO Tim Stapleford. Paul joins from Capital One where he served as the Vice President of the Center for Machine Learning, an in-house consultancy and center of excellence for machine learning product delivery, innovation, education, research and development, and partnership across the business. Paul joined Capital One through the acquisition of Notch, a machine learning consulting firm that Paul founded in 2014. Prior to founding Notch and serving as its Chief Executive Officer until its 2018 acquisition by Capital One, Paul served in senior software development roles at Red Hat, Affinion, Plan- G, and other leading technology firms.


Sound location inspired by bat ears could help robots navigate outdoors

Engadget

Sound location technology has often been patterned around the human ear, but why do that when bats are clearly better at it? Virginia Tech researchers have certainly asked that question. They've developed a sound location system that mates a bat-like ear design with a deep neural network to pinpoint sounds within half a degree -- a pair of human ears is only accurate within nine degrees, and even the latest technology stops at 7.5 degrees. The system flutters the outer ear to create Doppler shift signatures related to the sound's source. As the patterns are too complex to easily decipher, the team trained the neural network to provide the source direction for every received echo.


The key to stopping procrastination? Compassion.

Christian Science Monitor | Science

One of the most amazing things about the human mind is its ability to imagine events that haven't happened yet. To make a decision about something new – trying a new dish, picking a show to watch, and choosing a career – you have to mentally construct the experience and then predict how pleasant or unpleasant it will be. But this simulation, say psychologists, is often distorted. Our predictions tend to exaggerate how happy or sad we'll feel, and for how long. "No doubt good things make us happy and bad things make us sad," says Tim Wilson, a social psychologist at the University of Virginia. "But as a rule, not as long as we think they will." In the final episode of the Monitor's six-part series "It's About Time," hosts Rebecca Asoulin and Eoin O'Carroll explore how thinking about our future selves can help us make better decisions in the present. "We are always making trade-offs about things happening now versus later," says Dorsa Amir, an evolutionary anthropologist at Boston College. One of the most common ways that our present selves trip up our future selves is by procrastinating. But there are many ways for us to overcome the tendency to put things off, says Fuschia Sirois, a psychologist at the University of Sheffield in England. So the next time you notice yourself about to procrastinate, remind yourself that it's OK to struggle. This is the final episode of a six-part series that's part of the Monitor's "Rethinking the News" podcast. To listen to the other episodes on our site or on your favorite podcast player, please visit the "It's About Time" series page. This audio story was designed to be heard. We strongly encourage you to experience it with your ears, but we understand that is not an option for everybody. You can find the audio player above.