Texas


HLS verifies artificial intelligence for ADAS in autonomous cars

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About the author Andrew Macleod is the director of automotive marketing at Siemens, focusing on the Mentor product suite. He has more than 15 years of experience in the automotive software and semiconductor industry, with expertise in new product development and introduction, automotive integrated circuit product management and global strategy, including a focus on the Chinese auto industry. He earned a 1st class honors engineering degree from the University of Paisley in the UK and lives in Austin, Texas.


Facebook and CMU's 'superhuman' poker AI beats human pros

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AI has definitively beaten humans at another of our favorite games. A poker bot, designed by researchers from Facebook's AI lab and Carnegie Mellon University, has bested some of the world's top players in a series of games of six-person no-limit Texas Hold'em poker. Over 12 days and 10,000 hands, the AI system named Pluribus faced off against 12 pros in two different settings. In one, the AI played alongside five human players; in the other, five versions of the AI played with one human player (the computer programs were unable to collaborate in this scenario). Pluribus won an average of $5 per hand with hourly winnings of around $1,000 -- a "decisive margin of victory," according to the researchers.


An Artificial Intelligence Program Just Beat 5 Poker Professionals In a Texas Hold'em Tournament

TIME - Tech

A new artificial intelligence program the company built with Carnegie Mellon University called Pluribus recently beat five poker professionals in a six-player Texas Hold'em tournament. After 10,000 hands, the system averaged profits of about $1,000 per hour using $1 chips, a "decisive margin of victory," according to a Facebook blog post. AI has been besting humans at poker for a couple of years, but previous programs could compete with just a single player at a time. Given the complexities that come with poker, including techniques like bluffing, beating five humans in a single game is a significant milestone, Facebook said. "No other game embodies the challenge of hidden information quite like poker, where each player has information (his or her cards) that the others lack," Facebook wrote in a blog post.


AI beats professionals at six-player Texas Hold 'Em poker

New Scientist

Artificial intelligence has finally cracked the biggest challenge in poker: beating top professionals in six-player no-limit Texas Hold'Em, the most popular variant of the game. Over 20,000 hands of online poker, the AI beat fifteen of the world's top poker players, each of whom has won more than $1 million USD playing the game professionally. The AI, called Pluribus, was tested in 10,000 games against five human players, as well as in 10,000 rounds where five copies of Pluribus played against one professional – and did better than the pros in both. Pluribus was developed by Noam Brown of Facebook AI Research and Tuomas Sandholm at Carnegie Mellon University in the US. It is an improvement on their previous poker-playing AI, called Libratus, which in 2017 outplayed professionals at Heads-Up Texas Hold'Em, a variant of the game that pits two players head to head.


My poker face: AI wins multiplayer game for first time

The Guardian

An artificial intelligence called Pluribus has emerged victorious from a marathon 12-day poker session during which it played five human professionals at a time. Over 10,000 hands of no-limit Texas hold'em, the most popular form of the game, Pluribus won a virtual $48,000 (£38,000), beating five elite players who were selected each day from a pool who agreed to take on the program. All of the pros had previously won more than $1m playing the game. What counts as a beating for humanity ranks as a milestone for AI. No computer program has ever achieved superhuman performance against multiple poker players.


Bet On The Bot: AI Beats The Professionals At 6-Player Texas Hold 'Em

NPR Technology

During one experiment, the poker bot Pluribus played against five professional players. During one experiment, the poker bot Pluribus played against five professional players. In artificial intelligence, it's a milestone when a computer program can beat top players at a game like chess. But a game like poker, specifically six-player Texas Hold'em, has been too tough for a machine to master -- until now. Researchers say they have designed a bot called Pluribus capable of taking on poker professionals in the most popular form of poker and winning.


Facebook's artificial intelligence-powered machine defeats FIVE Texas hold'em champions at once

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A computer has beaten five of the world's champion players at poker -- a game once thought too difficult for machines to master. It is the latest milestone marking the superior powers of machines over people and the first time a computer has beaten more than one opponent in a complex game of strategy and calculation. Computers first defeated the human world champion at chess in 1996 -- and the even-more complex Chinese strategy game of Go two years ago. But poker has posed a tougher challenge as it involves several players around the table. And unlike in chess or Go, the computer does not have access to all the information available as it cannot see its opponent's cards.


'Superhuman' AI Crushes Poker Pros at Six-Player Texas Hold'em

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Computer scientists have developed a card-playing bot, called Pluribus, capable of defeating some of the world's best players at six-person no-limit Texas hold'em poker, in what's considered an important breakthrough in artificial intelligence. Two years ago, a research team from Carnegie Mellon University developed a similar poker-playing system, called Libratus, which consistently defeated the world's best players at one-on-one Heads-Up, No-Limit Texas Hold'em poker. The creators of Libratus, Tuomas Sandholm and Noam Brown, have now upped the stakes, unveiling a new system capable of playing six-player no-limit Texas hold'em poker, a wildly popular version of the game. In a series of contests, Pluribus handedly defeated its professional human opponents, at a level the researchers described as "superhuman." When pitted against professional human opponents with real money involved, Pluribus managed to collect winnings at an astounding rate of $1,000 per hour.


Domino's teams up with Nuro for driverless pizza delivery in Houston

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Nuro, the self-driving delivery startup, is teaming up with Domino's to launch a pilot for driverless pizza delivery in Houston, Texas, the companies announced Monday. Starting later this year, Domino's will use Nuro's driverless fleet of custom-built robot cars to deliver pizza to select Houston residents who place orders online. Nuro, which was founded by two ex-members of Google's pioneering self-driving team, has been using its fleet of R1 robot cars to deliver groceries to residents of Scottsdale, Arizona, and more recently, Houston. If the pilot with Domino's goes well, it's safe to assume Nuro will look to expand it to other markets as well. Nuro has been ramping up its activities in recent months since receiving a $1 billion investment from Japanese tech company SoftBank.


Chemical Patterns May Predict Stars That Host Giant Planets - Eos

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Does this star have a planet? A new algorithm could help astronomers predict, on the basis of a star's chemical fingerprint, whether that star will host a giant gaseous exoplanet. "It's like Netflix," Natalie Hinkel, a planetary astrophysicist at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas, told Eos. Netflix "sees that you like goofy comedy, science fiction, and kung fu movies--a variety of different patterns" to predict whether you'll like a new movie. Likewise, her team's machine learning algorithm "will learn which elements are influential in deciding whether or not a star has a planet."