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Tesla Profits, Health Care Algorithm Bias, and More News

#artificialintelligence

Tesla looks to Shanghai and Joker fans head to the Bronx, but first, today's cartoon: What's rarer than a unicorn? Here's the news you need to know, in two minutes or less. Want to receive this two-minute roundup as an email every weekday? Good news out of the Gigafactory: Tesla is back in black. On Wednesday, the electric carmaker announced a positive net profit in its quarterly report, the first record of earnings for the company since the end of 2018.


A Summer Camp With a Long Plan: Keeping Bias Out of Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Anaya Bussey didn't know much about "artificial intelligence" when she arrived at a camp at Princeton University earlier this summer other than that "it was definitely blowing up." But after just three weeks here she and other students--all incoming high school juniors--teamed up to use the technology to help diagnose melanoma by looking at skin lesions. Bussey, 15, who is from the Bronx borough in New York City, has been interested in computer science since she was in elementary school. But there have been times when she's been one of only a handful of girls--or black students--in a computer class or program. That wasn't the case at the Princeton summer camp, run by AI4ALL, a two-year-old nonprofit that seeks to increase diversity and inclusion in AI education, research, and policy.


How U.S. Weapons Ended Up Hitting Hospitals in Yemen

NYT > Middle East

Visual Investigations Latest Video 10:45 How U.S. Weapons Ended Up Hitting Hospitals in Yemen Visual Investigations Latest Video 5:44 The U.S. Blamed Maduro for Burning Aid to Venezuela. Visual Investigations Latest Video 8:57 How an Elite Nigerian Unit Killed Dozens of Protesters Visual Investigations Latest Video 6:52 A Black Driver, a Marijuana Bust and a Body Camera That Turned Off Visual Investigations Latest Video 8:32 Killing Khashoggi: How a Brutal Saudi Hit Job Unfolded Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:31 The Bomb Suspect's Van Is Covered With Stickers. Visual Investigations Latest Video 7:07 How a Gang Hunted and Killed a 15-Year-Old in the Bronx Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:48 How a C.I.A. Drone Base Grew in the Desert Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:49 How Surveillance Cameras Tracked Two Russian Hit Men Visual Investigations Latest Video 3:04 How the Drone Attack on Maduro Unfolded in Venezuela Visual Investigations Latest Video 5:44 The U.S. Blamed Maduro for Burning Aid to Venezuela. The U.S. Blamed Maduro for Burning Aid to Venezuela. Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:31 The Bomb Suspect's Van Is Covered With Stickers.


How U.S. Weapons Ended Up Hitting Hospitals in Yemen

NYT > Middle East

Visual Investigations Latest Video 10:43 How U.S. Weapons Ended Up Hitting Hospitals in Yemen Visual Investigations Latest Video 5:44 The U.S. Blamed Maduro for Burning Aid to Venezuela. Visual Investigations Latest Video 8:57 How an Elite Nigerian Unit Killed Dozens of Protesters Visual Investigations Latest Video 6:52 A Black Driver, a Marijuana Bust and a Body Camera That Turned Off Visual Investigations Latest Video 8:32 Killing Khashoggi: How a Brutal Saudi Hit Job Unfolded Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:31 The Bomb Suspect's Van Is Covered With Stickers. Visual Investigations Latest Video 7:07 How a Gang Hunted and Killed a 15-Year-Old in the Bronx Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:48 How a C.I.A. Drone Base Grew in the Desert Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:49 How Surveillance Cameras Tracked Two Russian Hit Men Visual Investigations Latest Video 3:04 How the Drone Attack on Maduro Unfolded in Venezuela Visual Investigations Latest Video 5:44 The U.S. Blamed Maduro for Burning Aid to Venezuela. The U.S. Blamed Maduro for Burning Aid to Venezuela. Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:31 The Bomb Suspect's Van Is Covered With Stickers.


Facial recognition flunks ID test at New York City's RFK Bridge, report says

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Traffic crawls through the wind and snow on the RFK Bridge on Friday in the Queens borough of New York. So reports the Wall Street Journal which reviewed an internal email sent by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the state agency which manages all the traffic crossing the area's bridges and tunnels. The MTA email was sent to the office of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. According to the email, the "initial period for the proof of concept testing at the (Robert F. Kennedy Bridge connecting Manhattan, the Bronx and Queens) for facial recognition has been completed and failed with no faces (0%) being detected within acceptable parameters." Besides the RFK Bridge, the MTA is testing the technology at the Throgs Neck and Whitestone bridges, as well as at the Midtown and Hugh L. Carey tunnels.


These techniques are proven to boost certain cognitive functions

Popular Science

Half of Americans believe games like crossword puzzles and Sudoku keep them sharp. These cerebral pastimes may indeed improve something called working memory--your ability to recall things in the short term--but only because that skill is inherent to solving the puzzles themselves. The connection between games and long-term memory improvement is tenuous at best. One 2014 study on 488 residents of the Bronx did find that crossword participation delayed memory decline by more than 2.5 years, but dementia patients with this advantage saw an even sharper drop in cognitive function after that point. In other words, tackling word challenges might have some sort of benefit when it comes to keeping the mind nimble, but eventually your age will catch up with you.


Semantic graph database underpins healthcare data lake

@machinelearnbot

Franz Inc., in partnership with Montefiore Health System, is bringing the data lake to health IT using Franz's semantic graph database technology. Until its venture into the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries over the past few years, the 31-year-old Oakland, Calif., company had done business mainly in the worlds of national defense and intelligence, into which it sold its artificial intelligence-based triple store database that uses semantic, instead of relational, database technology. The system Franz has adapted for health IT, with partners such as Montefiore in the Bronx, N.Y., is based on AllegroGraph, one of its flagship products. Montefiore is using the system, called the Semantic Data Lake for Healthcare, to perform sophisticated predictive analytics in a quest to improve patient care and lower hospital costs. AllegroGraph uses the resource description framework (RDF) standard known as a "triple" to process and represent data semantically, and graph visualization software for visual discovery.


Five Boroughs for the 21st Century – topos.ai – Medium

#artificialintelligence

The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and Staten Island -- have existed in their present form since the consolidation of New York City in 1898. In the interim 119 years, the city has radically transformed; the individual boroughs are now inter-connected in ways that would have been unimaginable at the time of their formation. A vast network of bridges, tunnels and the largest rapid transit system in the world connect the populations, establishments, and institutions of each borough -- to say nothing of the connections enabled by the explosion of digital and mobile technologies. In this article we explore what happens when we abandon this century-old partitioning and remap the city to reflect the realities of New York City in 2017. Using data from dozens of different sources and techniques from a wide range of technologies and disciplines including computer vision, natural language processing, statistics, machine learning, network science, topology, architecture and urbanism, we constructed a new partitioning of the city that resonates with our contemporary moment -- 5 boroughs for the 21st century.


DANIEL BOBROW Obituary: DANIEL BOBROW's Obituary by the New York Times.

AITopics Custom Links

Daniel (Danny) Bobrow passed away peacefully at home with his wife Toni and daughters Kimberly and Deborah in Palo Alto, California, on March 20, 2017, having bravely fought a five-month battle with cancer. Danny was born to Ruth Gureasko Bobrow and Jacob Bobrow on November 29, 1935, in the Bronx, New York City. A gifted student, he attended Bronx High School of Science and went on to earn a BS from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, an MS from Harvard, and a PhD in Mathematics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology under the supervision of Marvin Minsky. His was one of the first MIT doctoral theses in Artificial Intelligence. A pioneer with a long and distinguished research career in Artificial Intelligence as a Research Fellow in the System Sciences Laboratory of the Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), he is remembered as a mentor, friend, and role model for many.


A.I. Versus M.D.

#artificialintelligence

One evening last November, a fifty-four-year-old woman from the Bronx arrived at the emergency room at Columbia University's medical center with a grinding headache. Her vision had become blurry, she told the E.R. doctors, and her left hand felt numb and weak. The doctors examined her and ordered a CT scan of her head. A few months later, on a morning this January, a team of four radiologists-in-training huddled in front of a computer in a third-floor room of the hospital. The room was windowless and dark, aside from the light from the screen, which looked as if it had been filtered through seawater. The residents filled a cubicle, and Angela Lignelli-Dipple, the chief of neuroradiology at Columbia, stood behind them with a pencil and pad. She was training them to read CT scans. "It's easy to diagnose a stroke once the brain is dead and gray," she said. "The trick is to diagnose the stroke before too many nerve cells begin to die." Strokes are usually caused by blockages or bleeds, and a neuroradiologist has about a forty-five-minute window to make a diagnosis, so that doctors might be able to intervene--to dissolve a growing clot, say. "Imagine you are in the E.R.," Lignelli-Dipple continued, raising the ante. "Every minute that passes, some part of the brain is dying. Time lost is brain lost." She glanced at a clock on the wall, as the seconds ticked by. "So where's the problem?" she asked. The blood supply to the brain branches left and right and then breaks into rivulets and tributaries on each side. A clot or a bleed usually affects only one of these branches, leading to a one-sided deficit in a part of the brain. As the nerve cells lose their blood supply and die, the tissue swells subtly.