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Black tech organizations grow amid calls for racial justice

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Amazon applied science manager Dr. Nashlie Sephus has lived in New York City, Atlanta, Silicon Valley, and Seoul while pursuing her education and work in machine learning. She knows the look of a community that's thriving from technology and innovation, but she didn't see that growth happening in her hometown of Jackson, Mississippi. That's why last week she concluded an 18-month process by signing contracts to secure 12 acres of land that will be home to the Jackson Tech District. The Bean Path, a nonprofit organization created by Sephus, will operate a maker and innovation space on the land. There will also be restaurants and residential lofts spread across eight buildings, all located near the historically Black Jackson State University.


Amazon.com: Scope Forward: The Future of Gastroenterology Is Now in Your Hands eBook: Suthrum, Praveen: Kindle Store

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"Scope Forward is a complete study allowing providers to grasp and conquer the previously shadowy realm of the business of medicine. This text is a must for healthcare leaders charting their course to success." Reed B. Hogan, GI Associates and Endoscopy Center, Mississippi "What Praveen has done in his book Scope Forward is to illuminate us about a whole range of issues pertinent to the future of GI, from artificial intelligence to private equity. This is a very welcome entry into the'must read' category for all those involved in Gastroenterology. You will learn a lot!" --Dr.


LI artificial intelligence startup predicts where COVID-19 will spike – IAM Network

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A Long Island artificial intelligence startup has built software aimed at pinpointing U.S. counties where the COVID-19 outbreak is likely to be most deadly. In a June report, the data-mining company, Akai Kaeru LLC, forecast spiking COVID-19 mortality with the heaviest concentrations in counties of the Southeast, including Mississippi, Georgia and Louisiana, said co-founder and chief executive Klaus Mueller. Nationwide, the software found 985 out of all 3,007 U.S. counties are at risk. "These patterns identify groups of counties that have a steeper increase in the death-rate trajectory," he said. Closer to home, the software found Nassau and Suffolk counties are likely to be relatively stable, but Westchester and Rockland counties are potential tinderboxes that could tip into crisis, said Mueller, a computer science professor on leave from Stony Brook University.


Video Game Shop Goes Curbside as Patrons 'Escape' Virus

U.S. News

Sacco said he wanted to figure out he could let his employees continue working and avoid layoffs, so his staff has been working on cultivating a database to prepare for online sales. They're selling on Facebook and Ebay now but hope to build a website in the future, Sacco said.


From Buzzword to Clinical Tool: Setting the Record Straight on AI in the Life Sciences

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Artificial intelligence (AI) far too often pops up as a term used vaguely to refer to any process that appears to involve more computers than it did twenty years ago. But concrete examples of how this informatics technology can improve fields like life sciences are harder to come by. I recently spoke to Krishnan Nandabalan, founder, CEO and president of InveniAI, which aims to use AI techniques to more quickly identify pharmacological compounds and get drugs to patients faster, to get the full picture. Ruairi Mackenzie (RM): How would you like to set the record straight about AI in the life sciences? Krishnan Nandabalan (KN): AI is used as a buzzword now.


DARPA tests drone swarms that send groups of up to 250 autonomous vehicles into combat areas

Daily Mail - Science & tech

This week, DARPA shared footage of an experimental new program that uses large drones swarms to locate targets and gather situational intelligence in urban raid missions. Part of DARPA's Offensive Swarm-Enabled Tactics (OFFSET) program, the test featured a coordinated group of 250 autonomous air and ground vehicles. Those vehicles were sent into to a simulated urban environment, providing live information about sight lines, enemy positioning, environmental hazards, and general layout as part of a simulated military raid. The test was conducted at DARPA's Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center, a facility in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. The missions tasked the drone swarm with finding several AprilTags, a kind of QR code, that had been placed inside buildings in the training compound, which was designed to approximate a city block.


Army veteran says his prosthetic legs were repossessed after VA refused to pay for them

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines for Jan. 10 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com A Mississippi Army veteran who served in both Vietnam and Iraq says his prosthetic legs were repossessed and returned in an unusable state -- because the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) refused to pay for them. Jerry Holliman, 69, told the Clarion-Ledger newspaper that prosthetics vender Hanger repossessed his artificial limbs two days before Christmas. Although he was encouraged to use Medicare to find replacement prosthetic legs, Holliman said he wanted the VA to pay for them.


This company wants to 3D print rockets on the surface of Mars

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For a factory where robots toil around the clock to build a rocket with almost no human labour, the sound of grunts echoing across the parking lot make for a jarring contrast. "That's Keanu Reeves' stunt gym," says Tim Ellis, the chief executive and cofounder of Relativity Space, a startup that wants to combine 3D printing and artificial intelligence to do for the rocket what Henry Ford did for the automobile. As we walk among the robots occupying Relativity's factory, he points out the just-completed upper stage of the company's rocket, which will soon be shipped to Mississippi for its first tests. Across the way, he says, gesturing to the outside world, is a recording studio run by Snoop Dogg. Neither of those A-listers have paid a visit to Relativity's rocket factory, but the presence of these unlikely neighbours seems to underscore the company's main talking point: It can make rockets anywhere.


Massive, AI-Powered Robots Are 3D-Printing Entire Rockets

#artificialintelligence

For a factory where robots toil around the clock to build a rocket with almost no human labor, the sound of grunts echoing across the parking lot make for a jarring contrast. "That's Keanu Reeves' stunt gym," says Tim Ellis, the chief executive and cofounder of Relativity Space, a startup that wants to combine 3D printing and artificial intelligence to do for the rocket what Henry Ford did for the automobile. As we walk among the robots occupying Relativity's factory, he points out the just-completed upper stage of the company's rocket, which will soon be shipped to Mississippi for its first tests. Across the way, he says, gesturing to the outside world, is a recording studio run by Snoop Dogg. Neither of those A-listers have paid a visit to Relativity's rocket factory, but the presence of these unlikely neighbors seems to underscore the company's main talking point: It can make rockets anywhere.


Massive, AI-Powered Robots Are 3D-Printing Entire Rockets

#artificialintelligence

For a factory where robots toil around the clock to build a rocket with almost no human labor, the sound of grunts echoing across the parking lot make for a jarring contrast. "That's Keanu Reeves' stunt gym," says Tim Ellis, the chief executive and cofounder of Relativity Space, a startup that wants to combine 3D printing and artificial intelligence to do for the rocket what Henry Ford did for the automobile. As we walk among the robots occupying Relativity's factory, he points out the just-completed upper stage of the company's rocket, which will soon be shipped to Mississippi for its first tests. Across the way, he says, gesturing to the outside world, is a recording studio run by Snoop Dogg. Neither of those A-listers have paid a visit to Relativity's rocket factory, but the presence of these unlikely neighbors seems to underscore the company's main talking point: It can make rockets anywhere.