Michigan


Ann Arbor to host artificial intelligence, machine learning conference

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ANN ARBOR, MI -- Business officials will gather in Ann Arbor this month to discuss how they've used artificial intelligence and machine learning to …


Coursera Python for Everybody Specialization Review JA Directives

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Coursera Python for Everybody Specialization from University of Michigan is for those who are the complete beginners to programming language and also for who have no prior programming experience. This online coursera python for everybody course helps you to learn the basics of programming using Python Programming Language. This specialization will cover the fundamental topics of how you construct a program from a simple instruction in Python. After a general introduction to programming, coursera python for everybody teaches you how to use python to extract data from the web and work with databases. It's a good demonstration of how Python can be useful for managing large datasets.


Nailed it: Researchers unveil octocopter carpenter that attaches shingles to a roof using a nail gun

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Researchers have unveiled an octocopter that attaches asphalt shingles to roofs using a nail gun and'virtual switch'. This robotic carpenter's software measures the force needed to compress the point of the nail gun and a human operator activates a virtual switch when the robotic carpenter is in place. Researchers have unveiled its roofing octocopter that attaches asphalt shingles to roofs using a nail gun and'virtual switch' The roofing octocopter is the brain child of researchers at the University of Michigan, which is part of the movement to shift humans from'dull, dirty and dangerous job' into'cleaner, safer and more interesting jobs'. 'For me, the biggest excitement of this work is in recognizing that autonomous, useful, physical interaction and construction tasks are possible with drones,' said Ella Atkins, a professor of aerospace engineering and robotics. The team used a system of markers and stationary cameras to enable the drone to precisely locate itself in space and the system was also used to tell it where to place the nails.


DOD Takes Hackathon to University of Michigan

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The Defense Department today is wrapping up a three-day "hackathon" aimed at using artificial intelligence for aircraft maintenance.


Evolution Of Learning Is Key To Better Artificial Intelligence

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Since "2001: A Space Odyssey," people have wondered: could machines like HAL 9000 eventually exist that can process information with human-like intelligence? Researchers at Michigan State University say that true, human-level intelligence remains a long way off, but their new paper published in The American Naturalist explores how computers could begin to evolve learning in the same way as natural organisms did – with implications for many fields, including artificial intelligence. "We know that all organisms are capable of some form of learning, we just weren't sure how those abilities first evolved. Now we can watch these major evolutionary events unfold before us in a virtual world," said Anselmo Pontes, MSU computer science researcher and lead author. "Understanding how learning behavior evolved helps us figure out how it works and provides insights to other fields such as neuroscience, education, psychology, animal behavior, and even AI. It also supplies clues to how our brains work and could even lead to robots that learn from experiences as effectively as humans do."


Take cover, it's a drone with a nail gun! – TechCrunch

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The FAA has warned against equipping your drone with weapons such as flamethrowers and handguns. But can a nail gun really be considered a weapon -- that is, outside of Quake? Let's hope not, because roboticists at the University of Michigan have made a roofing drone that uses that tool to autonomously nail shingles into place. In a video shot in UM's special drone testing habitat, the craft flies up, approaches its bit of roof, and gingerly applies the nail gun before backing off and doing it a couple more times. It's very much just a tech demonstration right now, with lots of room to improve.


It's possible to reverse-engineer AI chatbots to spout nonsense, smut or sensitive information

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Machine-learning chatbot systems can be exploited to control what they say, according to boffins from Michigan State University and TAL AI Lab. "There exists a dark side of these models – due to the vulnerability of neural networks, a neural dialogue model can be manipulated by users to say what they want, which brings in concerns about the security of practical chatbot services," the researchers wrote in a paper (PDF) published on arXiv. They crafted a "Reverse Dialogue Generator" (RDG) to spit out a range of inputs that match up to a particular output. Text-based models normally work the other way, where outputs are generated after having been given an input. For example, given the sentence "Hi, how are you?", a computer learns to output a response like "Fine, thank you" as it learns that is one of the most common replies to that question in training data.


Evolution of learning is key to better artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Since "2001: A Space Odyssey," people have wondered: could machines like HAL 9000 eventually exist that can process information with human-like intelligence? Researchers at Michigan State University say that true, human-level intelligence remains a long way off, but their new paper published in The American Naturalist explores how computers could begin to evolve learning in the same way as natural organisms did--with implications for many fields, including artificial intelligence. "We know that all organisms are capable of some form of learning, we just weren't sure how those abilities first evolved. Now we can watch these major evolutionary events unfold before us in a virtual world," said Anselmo Pontes, MSU computer science researcher and lead author. "Understanding how learning behavior evolved helps us figure out how it works and provides insights to other fields such as neuroscience, education, psychology, animal behavior, and even AI. It also supplies clues to how our brains work and could even lead to robots that learn from experiences as effectively as humans do."


Evolution of learning is key to better artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Researchers at Michigan State University say that true, human-level intelligence remains a long way off, but their new paper published in The American Naturalist explores how computers could begin to evolve learning in the same way as natural organisms did -- with implications for many fields, including artificial intelligence. "We know that all organisms are capable of some form of learning, we just weren't sure how those abilities first evolved. Now we can watch these major evolutionary events unfold before us in a virtual world," said Anselmo Pontes, MSU computer science researcher and lead author. "Understanding how learning behavior evolved helps us figure out how it works and provides insights to other fields such as neuroscience, education, psychology, animal behavior, and even AI. It also supplies clues to how our brains work and could even lead to robots that learn from experiences as effectively as humans do."


Ping An Leads Investment in Riverain Technologies to Advance AI in Healthcare

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Ping An Insurance (Group) Company of China, Ltd. (hereafter "Ping An" or the "Group", HKEX: 2318; SSE: 601318) is pleased to announce Ping An Global Voyager Fund is leading an investment of US$15 Million in Riverain Technologies, a leading provider of clinical artificial intelligence software used to efficiently detect lung disease at its earliest stages. Riverain Technologies markets advanced artificial intelligence imaging software used by leading hospitals around the world. The software significantly improves a clinician's ability to accurately and efficiently detect cancer and other cell anomalies in thoracic CT and X-ray images. The company's suite of patented ClearReadTM software tools are FDA-cleared, deployable in the clinic or in the cloud, and powered by the most advanced artificial intelligence and machine learning methods available to the medical imaging market. Its products are relied upon by leading healthcare institutions, including Duke University, Mayo Clinic, University of Chicago, University of Michigan, and Veterans Affairs hospitals.