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Senior Data Engineer

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Launched in 2011, Twitch is a global community that comes together each day to create multiplayer entertainment: unique, live, unpredictable experiences created by the interactions of millions. We bring the joy of co-op to everything, from casual gaming to world-class esports to anime marathons, music, and art streams. Twitch also hosts TwitchCon, where we bring everyone together to celebrate, learn, and grow their personal interests and passions. We're always live at Twitch. Twitch is building the future of interactive entertainment.


Chatbot or human? Either way, what matters for customer trust is 'perceived humanness'

#artificialintelligence

The helpful person guiding you through your online purchase might not be a person at all. As artificial intelligence and natural language processing advance, we often don't know if we are talking to a person or an AI-powered chatbot, says Tom Kelleher, Ph.D., an advertising professor in the University of Florida's College of Journalism and Communications. What matters more than who (or what) is on the other side of the chat, Kelleher has found, is the perceived humanness of the interaction. With text-based bots becoming ubiquitous and AI-powered voice systems emerging, consumers of everything from shoes to insurance may find themselves talking to non-humans. Companies will have to decide when bots are appropriate and effective and when they're not.


Chatbot or human? Either way, what matters for customer trust is "perceived humanness"

#artificialintelligence

The helpful person guiding you through your online purchase might not be a person at all. As artificial intelligence and natural language processing advance, we often don't know if we are talking to a person or an AI-powered chatbot, says Tom Kelleher, Ph.D., an advertising professor in the University of Florida's College of Journalism and Communications. What matters more than who (or what) is on the other side of the chat, Kelleher has found, is the perceived humanness of the interaction. With text-based bots becoming ubiquitous and AI-powered voice systems emerging, consumers of everything from shoes to insurance may find themselves talking to non-humans. Companies will have to decide when bots are appropriate and effective and when they're not.



How America Broke the Speed Limit

Slate

One Tuesday morning this fall, I strapped on a Mylar vest and slid into the passenger seat of a gray Ford Interceptor sedan, the souped-up Taurus that replaced the Crown Vic as America's default police car a decade ago. This model has several features that are not available for civilian use, including a siren on the roof and a V6 Mustang engine under the hood. That came in handy when Kevin Roberts, a talkative, thoughtful third-year cop, steered us onto Connecticut's Interstate 84 for the day shift. We were heading toward Waterbury, whose interlocking expressways are his to patrol. Roberts was in the left lane going 80, and I had the uncanny experience of surveying the highway from his point of view. How many times have I been on the other side--overtaking some slowpoke, 12 over the limit, only to see a rack of siren lights in the rearview mirror and ask myself: How slowly can I complete this pass? Roberts and I were waiting for that moment of panicked recognition. He knows people resent that the police are always speeding, but he says it's the only way to do the job. You can't drive the speed limit or below, because no one wants to pass a cop. The highway's self-organizing system would disintegrate and traffic would slow to molasses. "Everyone's at 10 and 2," he said as we made our way past another stone-faced commuter.


Connecticut Money: Artificial intelligence and the AI revolution

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The endless possibilities and concerns about future technologies are staggering. Some suggest that through AI's enhanced productivity we will get to a point that humans will be free from working monotonous jobs. In return, we may find ourselves receiving stipends from the work that our robot counterparts are performing. Others fear that our robotic workforce will work their way up the corporate ladder and push us out to pasture long before were ready to leave. No one really knows what the future holds, but one country has an interesting perspective on artificial intelligence and how it will be harnessed to serve its citizens.


Bipartisan bill seeks to curb recommendation algorithms

Engadget

A bipartisan group of House lawmakers has introduced legislation that would give people more control over the algorithms that shape their online experience. If passed, the Filter Bubble Transparency Act would require companies like Meta to offer a version of their platforms that runs on an "input-transparent" algorithm that doesn't pull on user data to generate recommendations. The bill would not do away with "opaque" recommendation algorithms altogether but would make it a requirement to include a toggle that allows people to switch that functionality off. Additionally, platforms that continue to use recommendation algorithms need to have a notification that informs people those recommendations are based on inferences generated by their personal data. The prompt can be a one-time notice, but it would need to be presented in a "clear, conspicuous manner," according to the proposed bill. The legislation was introduced by Representatives Ken Buck (R-CO), David Cicilline (D-RI), Lori Trahan (D-MA) and Burgess Owens (R-UT).


Natural Laws for Artificial Intelligence

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Gautam Naik was born and brought up in Pune and currently stays in Connecticut USA. He has more than twenty-five years of Entrepreneurship experience in Global Software Services. His successes as an IT entrepreneur include leading sizable teams globally, serving clients globally including fortune500 companies, and a couple of VC investments/successful mergers. He graduated from IIT Kharagpur as an Instrumentation engineer. He is a technocrat and has documented best practices and showcased the products launched by companies like Microsoft, Novell, and few Pioneering open-source technologies in various international meets/events/seminars.


Artificial Intelligence Expert to Speak at WCSU About COVID Data

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Lawrence currently volunteers as the COVID data scientist on Ridgefield's COVID-19 Task Force, providing daily analysis of the latest COVID-19 data to help town officials make science-based policy decisions, and provides periodic analysis of vaccination rates to the Office of the Governor of Connecticut. Lawrence's work has evolved from nuclear science to computer science to machine learning and, most recently, to quantitative finance. He joined IBM Research in Yorktown Heights, New York, in 1987, where he held a number of management positions, most recently as Distinguished Research Staff Member and Senior Manager, Machine Learning & Decision Analytics. From 2016 to 2019, he was president of PCIX, Inc., a New York City venture capital-funded startup that used machine learning to extract quantitative insight on the relationship between private-equity transactions and the performance of public markets. Lawrence received a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering from Stanford University and a doctorate in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Illinois.


Artificial intelligence expert to speak at WCSU about COVID data

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Western Connecticut State University Department of Philosophy and Humanistic Studies will present Dr. Rick Lawrence, of Ridgefield, for a discussion, "COVID-19: Perspectives from a Data Scientist," at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 3, in Room 125 of the Science Building on the university's Midtown campus, 181 White St., Danbury. The talk is free and open to the public in-person (masks must be worn) or virtually through this link. The program is also sponsored by WCSU's Department of Computer Science and Department of Mathematics. Lawrence currently volunteers as the COVID data scientist on Ridgefield's COVID-19 Task Force, providing daily analysis of the latest COVID-19 data to help town officials make science-based policy decisions, and provides periodic analysis of vaccination rates to the Office of the Governor of Connecticut. Lawrence's work has evolved from nuclear science to computer science to machine learning and, most recently, to quantitative finance.