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Curved origami provides new range of stiffness-to-flexibility in robots

#artificialintelligence

"The incorporation of curved origami structures into robotic design provides a remarkable possibility in tunable flexibility, or stiffness, as its complementary concept," explained Hanqing Jiang, a mechanical engineering professor at Arizona State University. "High flexibility, or low stiffness, is comparable to the soft landing navigated by a cat. Low flexibility, or high stiffness, is similar to executing of a hard jump in a pair of stiff boots," he said. Jiang is the lead author of a paper, "In Situ Stiffness Manipulation Using Elegant Curved Origami," published this week in Science Advances. "Curved Origami can add both strength and cat-like flexibility to robotic actions," he said.


Walmart, Cruise Launch Pilot to Deliver Orders via Self-Driving Cars

#artificialintelligence

Autonomous vehicle startup Cruise has partnered with Walmart to deliver orders from a Scottsdale, AZ, Walmart store to local customers' homes, starting early next year. General Motors-backed autonomous vehicle startup Cruise has announced a partnership with Walmart to deliver orders from a Scottsdale, AZ, Walmart store to local customers' homes, starting early next year. Customers will be able to place orders to the store and have them delivered in one of Cruise's electric self-driving Chevy Bolts. If the pilot goes well, a Cruise spokesperson said, the company will mull launching on-demand delivery with other retailers in the future. Walmart has forged driverless vehicle delivery partnerships with other automakers and startups.


Weekly Brief: Waymo AV Data Key to Building Consumer Trust – TU Automotive

#artificialintelligence

Waymo claimed last week that its autonomous vehicles are outperforming human drivers. In a report it compiled, between January 2019 and September 2020, the company's fleet of AVs logged 6.1 million miles in Phoenix, Arizona. Sixty-five thousand of those miles were without a safety driver behind the wheel. Waymo says that its fleet was not responsible for a single accident in that entire time. There were 18 minor accidents in which AVs were involved.


Waymo And Other Self-Driving Car Companies Readying Real-World Driverless Transportation

#artificialintelligence

The driverless taxi era has finally arrived, in parts of Arizona, at least. Two weeks after Alphabet-owned Waymo started its driverless taxi service to the public in Phoenix, other autonomous vehicle developers are following suit with test vehicles on public roads as well. Until spring this year, Waymo's self-driving vehicles were in their testing phase and were used in up to 10% of the firm's rides. The pandemic forced the company to shutter its doors and temporarily suspend on-road testing, but it is now back online and is expanding its operations. However, as is still required by law, the Waymo One taxi currently requires a human driver to be present to manage the car's autonomous operation and take control when necessary.


Waymo shares in-depth details of self-driving car activity in Phoenix

Engadget

Waymo's vehicles have driven a total of 6.1 million miles in Phoenix, Arizona, where it first started testing its self-driving technology. That's merely one of the many, many things the Alphabet-owned autonomous vehicle company has revealed in an in-depth report that details its activities in the Phoenix metro area. Apparently, 65,000 miles of that overall total were accomplished with no human driver behind the wheel. Also, from 2019 up until the first nine months of 2020, Waymo's vehicles were involved in 18 minor accidents and 29 situations wherein the human driver had to seize control to avoid potential collisions. The company's vehicles were involved 16 rear-enders, eight of which were caused by other drivers crashing into them while they're stopped or gradually decelerating for traffic ahead.


Waymo pulls back the curtain on 6.1 million miles of self-driving car data in Phoenix

#artificialintelligence

In its first report on its autonomous vehicle operations in Phoenix, Arizona, Waymo said that it was involved in 18 crashes and 29 near-miss collisions during 2019 and the first nine months of 2020. These crashes included rear-enders, vehicle swipes, and even one incident when a Waymo vehicle was T-boned at an intersection by another car at nearly 40 mph. The company said that no one was seriously injured and "nearly all" of the collisions were the fault of the other driver. The report is the deepest dive yet into the real-life operations of the world's leading autonomous vehicle company, which recently began offering rides in its fully driverless vehicles to the general public. Autonomous vehicle (AV) companies can be a black box, with most firms keeping a tight lid on measurable metrics and only demonstrating their technology to the public under the most controlled settings.


How AI Could Create More Job Opportunities

#artificialintelligence

The quality of worklife has been an emerging trend for companies over the last several years, and now, it's gaining more traction than ever. Today's workforce has become accustomed to using various types of automation and artificial intelligence (AI). These technologies have quickly become staples to a company's operations, which means certain jobs and tasks will no longer have to be done by humans. In fact, according to a study from Stanford and Arizona State Universities, "cities with greater increases in AI-related job postings exhibited greater economic growth." "This relationship was dependent on a city's ability to leverage its inherent capabilities in industry and education to create AI-based employment opportunities," the study read.


Hard To Believe, But Artificial Intelligence Will Improve Our Worklives

#artificialintelligence

For many years, something called "quality of worklife" was front and center for many enterprises, especially leaders in the HR sector. The reasoning was that a high-quality worklife (with lots of flexibility and sense of ownership) leads to corporate growth. Lately, the topic has begun to gain more attention, especially as automaton and artificial intelligence has taken root, threatening to mechanize many tasks and upend jobs. Researchers at Stanford and Arizona State Universities, for one, have been able to back up the assertion that worklife quality equals growth. "Cities with greater increases in AI-related job postings exhibited greater economic growth."


Asteroid samples escaping from jammed NASA spacecraft

FOX News

U.S. Space Force officials swear in first recruits for the defense branch on'Fox & amp; Friends.' CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A NASA spacecraft is stuffed with so much asteroid rubble from this week's grab that it's jammed open and precious particles are drifting away in space, scientists said Friday. Scientists announced the news three days after the spacecraft named Osiris-Rex briefly touched asteroid Bennu, NASA's first attempt at such a mission. The mission's lead scientist, Dante Lauretta of the University of Arizona, said Tuesday's operation 200 million miles away collected far more material than expected for return to Earth -- in the hundreds of grams. The sample container on the end of the robot arm penetrated so deeply into the asteroid and with such force, however, that rocks got sucked in and became wedged around the rim of the lid. In this image taken from video released by NASA, the Osiris-Rex spacecraft touches the surface of asteroid Bennu on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020.


Asteroid samples escaping from jammed NASA spacecraft

The Japan Times

Cape Canaveral, Florida – A NASA spacecraft is stuffed with so much asteroid rubble from this week's grab that it's jammed open and precious particles are drifting away in space, scientists said Friday. Scientists announced the news three days after the spacecraft named Osiris-Rex briefly touched asteroid Bennu, NASA's first attempt at such a mission. The mission's lead scientist, Dante Lauretta of the University of Arizona, said Tuesday's operation 200 million miles away collected far more material than expected for return to Earth – in the hundreds of grams. The sample container on the end of the robot arm penetrated so deeply into the asteroid and with such force, however, that rocks got sucked in and became wedged around the rim of the lid. Scientists estimate the sampler pressed as much as 19 inches (48 centimeters) into the rough, crumbly, black terrain.