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Toronto Brand Launches An AI-Designed Collection - View the VIBE Toronto

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So you've already heard of artificial intelligence aka AI and if you thought that on its own it was super cool, just wait until you buy clothes that are AI designed! Toronto-based urbancoolab has just launched and designed a collection that's entirely by artificial intelligence. The collection, called The RxR "Children of the Machine" was unveiled at Fashion Art Toronto and yes, it is as cool as it sounds. The experimental collaboration was inspired by the unique aesthetics of Belgian designer Raf Simons and American designer Rick Owens so you know it's going to be major. Urbancoolab founder Idris Mootee explains in a release, "The resulting designs are aptly described as retro-futurism with this blending the styles of two of the most influential designers of our time that may never happen in real life. Our aim is not to propose that artificial intelligence can replace human creativity – though that is certainly an intriguing question – rather to build the foundation for how we as humans can effectively collaborate with artificial intelligence to create art."


AI pioneer, visionary launches autonomous vehicle firm in Toronto - Electronic Products & Technology

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Waabi, founded by AI pioneer and visionary Raquel Urtasun, today launched out of stealth to build the next generation of self-driving technology. Waabi's innovative approach unleashes the power of AI to'drive' safely in the real world, bringing the promise of self-driving closer to commercialization than ever before. Waabi also announced today a $83.5-million (USD) Series A financing with backing from best-in-class investors across the technology, logistics and the Canadian innovation ecosystem. The round, which is among the largest Series A rounds ever raised in Canada, was led by Khosla Ventures with additional participation from Uber, Radical Ventures, 8VC, OMERS Ventures, BDC Capital's Women in Technology Venture Fund (WIT), Aurora Innovation Inc., AI luminaries Geoffrey Hinton, Fei-Fei Li, Pieter Abbeel, Sanja Fidler and others. AI and self-driving pioneer Raquel Urtasun is the founder and CEO of Waabi.


Litigating Artificial Intelligence: When Does AI Violate Our Legal Rights?

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Litigating Artificial Intelligence: When Does AI Violate Our Legal Rights? Read full article May 27, 2021, 3:20 PM ·3 min read From the minds of Canada's leading law and technology experts comes a playbook for understanding the multi-faceted intersection of AI and the law TORONTO, May 27, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- We are living in an Artificial Intelligence (AI) boom. Self-driving cars, personal voice assistants, and facial recognition technology are just a few of the AI-enabled technologies permeating into everyday life. But what happens when AI causes harm or violates our rights? If your self-driving car gets into an accident while on autopilot, are you responsible? Emond Publishing, Canada's leading independent legal publisher, today announced the release of Litigating Artificial Intelligence, a book examining AI-informed legal determinations, AI-based lawsuits, and AI-enabled litigation tools. Anchored by the expertise of general editors Jill R. Presser, Jesse Beatson, and Gerald Chan, this title offers practical insights regarding AI's decision-making capabilities, position in evidence law and product-based lawsuits, role in automating legal work, and use by the courts, tribunals, and government agencies. For example, can government agencies use AI-powered facial recognition software to identify BLM protestors and Capitol rioters, or does this violate privacy rights? Who is liable, users, developers, or AI? What laws are in place to prevent AI-related crimes, and how do litigators prosecute the responsible parties?


What Waabi's launch means for the self-driving car industry

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It is not the best of times for self-driving car startups. The past year has seen large tech companies acquire startups that were running out of cash and ride-hailing companies shutter costly self-driving car projects with no prospect of becoming production-ready anytime soon. Yet, in the midst of this downturn, Waabi, a Toronto-based self-driving car startup, has just come out of stealth with an insane amount of $83.5 million in a Series A funding round led by Khosla Ventures, with additional participation from Uber, 8VC, Radical Ventures, OMERS Ventures, BDC, and Aurora Innovation. The company's financial backers also include Geoffrey Hinton, Fei-Fei Li, Peter Abbeel, and Sanja Fidler, artificial intelligence scientists with great influence in the academia and applied AI community. What makes Waabi qualified for such support?


What Waabi's launch means for the self-driving car industry

#artificialintelligence

It is not the best of times for self-driving car startups. The past year has seen large tech companies acquire startups that were running out of cash and ride-hailing companies shutter costly self-driving car projects with no prospect of becoming production-ready anytime soon. Yet, in the midst of this downturn, Waabi, a Toronto-based self-driving car startup, has just come out of stealth with an insane amount of $83.5 million in a Series A funding round led by Khosla Ventures, with additional participation from Uber, 8VC, Radical Ventures, OMERS Ventures, BDC, and Aurora Innovation. The company's financial backers also include Geoffrey Hinton, Fei-Fei Li, Peter Abbeel, and Sanja Fidler, artificial intelligence scientists with great influence in the academia and applied AI community. What makes Waabi qualified for such support?


Self-Driven Women Take The Wheel In Autonomous Tech Industry

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The self-driving vehicle industry may be young, just a bit over a decade old, but already a meaningful trend is taking shape: it's proving to be more open to women CEOs and founders–including women of color–than the broader tech industry and for U.S. companies generally. With this week's news that Waabi founder and CEO Raquel Urtasun raised $83.5 million in a Series A round for her Toronto-based startup, three out of 12 leading autonomous technology companies in North America are now led by women. What's more, in a time when companies across all industries are working to improve diversity, two of the women leading self-driving tech companies, Zoox CEO Aicha Evans and Waymo co-CEO Tekedra Mawakana, are Black. "I've been really excited to see the number of women interested in autonomous technology. There's an appreciation for what it can do for people, what it's going to unlock," says Alisyn Malek, who left General Motors to cofound autonomous shuttle startup May Mobility in 2017 (and is currently executive director of the Washington-based Commission on the Future of Mobility).


Product Manager - Data Science - Toronto Hub

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Veeva [NYSE: VEEV] is the leader in cloud-based software for the global life sciences industry. Committed to innovation, product excellence, and customer success, our customers range from the world's largest pharmaceutical companies to emerging biotechs. Veeva's software helps our customers bring medicines and therapies to patients faster. We are the first public company to become a Public Benefit Corporation. As a PBC, we are committed to making the industries we serve more productive, and we are committed to creating high-quality employment opportunities.


Waabi, the rare autonomous vehicle startup with a woman CEO, raises $83.5 million

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Waabi is a new autonomous vehicle startup with a few things going for it to help it rise above the fray. For one, it's founded by Raquel Urtasun, a renowned expert in computer vision who ran Uber Advanced Technology Group's Toronto outpost, making it one of the few women-led AV startups in the world. Second, the Toronto-based company just came out of stealth having raised $83.5 million, which is among the largest Series A rounds ever raised in Canada. The round was led by Khosla Ventures, with additional participation from Urtasun's former employer, Uber, and Aurora, the AV startup that ended up acquiring Uber ATG in a deal last year. Funding was also raised from 8VC, Radical Ventures, Omers Ventures, BDC, AI luminaries Geoffrey Hinton, Fei-Fei Li, Pieter Abbeel, Sanja Fidler, and others.


Machine learning speeds up simulations in material science

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Research, development, and production of novel materials depend heavily on the availability of fast and at the same time accurate simulation methods. Machine learning, in which artificial intelligence (AI) autonomously acquires and applies new knowledge, will soon enable researchers to develop complex material systems in a purely virtual environment. How does this work, and which applications will benefit? In an article published in the Nature Materials journal, a researcher from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and his colleagues from Göttingen and Toronto explain it all. Digitization and virtualization are becoming increasingly important in a wide range of scientific disciplines.


Uber Veteran Launches Her 'AI Mindset' Self-Driving Startup With $83.5 Million Round

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Waabi founder and CEO Raquel Urtasan, a computer scientist and University of Toronto professor, sees a new path to commercializing self-driving technology. Computer scientist Raquel Urtasan, an artificial intelligence expert who led a team of Toronto-based engineers for Uber's self-driving vehicle program, is launching tech startup Waabi with an $83.5 million funding round and a new "AI mindset" approach to commercializing automated driving. The Series A round, among the biggest for any Canadian tech startup, is led by Khosla Ventures and includes investment from Uber, Radical Ventures, 8VC, OMERS Ventures and BDC Capital's Women in Technology Venture Fund. Aurora Innovation, the self-driving tech company that acquired Uber ATG last December, is a minority investor. AI experts including Stanford University's Fei-Fei Li, the University of Toronto's Geoffrey Hinton and Sanja Fidler and the University of California, Berkeley's Pieter Abbeel also participated in the round.