Middle East


European News Agencies discuss artificial intelligence

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Anadolu Agency called on other European news media organizations to be more sensitive towards the ongoing tragedy in Syria. A three-day general assembly of the European Alliance of News Agencies (EANA) came to an end on Friday in the Czech capital Prague. Anadolu Agency editor-in-chief Metin Mutanoglu said in a speech that Syria's northwestern Idlib area was under heavy fire by Bashar al-Assad regime forces and that the region was facing a fresh wave of migrants. Mutanoglu underlined that though tens of thousands were forced to leave their homes due to regime attacks, the European news media were not interested enough in the issue. A new migration wave would affect not only Turkey but the rest of Europe as well, he stressed, adding that EANA should thus make a greater effort to draw attention to the humanitarian crisis in war-torn country .


Harry Kazianis: Trump wise to avoid a devastating war with Iran in wake of attack on Saudi Arabia

FOX News

There's an old saying that wars are easy to get into but hard to get out of. President Trump understands this, which is why he wisely resisted the temptation to launch a military strike against Iran after that nation launched a missile and drone attack last week against Saudi Arabian oil facilities. When he was running for president, Trump promised the American people he would not jump into endless conflicts in the greater Middle East, where thousands of members of the U.S. military have been killed and wounded in wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Fighting began in 2001 in Afghanistan and 2003 in Iraq and still continues in both countries. U.S. forces have also fought on a smaller scale in Syria to strike at terrorist targets.


Microsoft chief Brad Smith says rise of killer robots is 'unstoppable'

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The rise of killer robots is now unstoppable and a new digital Geneva Convention is essential to protect the world from the growing threat they pose, according to the President of the world's biggest technology company. In an interview with The Telegraph, Brad Smith, president of Microsoft, said the use of'lethal autonomous weapon systems' poses a host of new ethical questions which need to be considered by governments as a matter of urgency. He said the rapidly advancing technology, in which flying, swimming or walking drones can be equipped with lethal weapons systems – missiles, bombs or guns – which could be programmed to operate entirely or partially autonomously, "ultimately will spread… to many countries". The US, China, Israel, South Korea, Russia and the UK are all developing weapon systems with a significant degree of autonomy in the critical functions of selecting and attacking targets. The technology is a growing focus for many militaries because replacing troops with machines can make the decision to go to war easier.


Where Does Artificial Intelligence Fit in the Classroom?

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Mr. Yiannouka is the CEO of the World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE), a global think tank of the Qatar Foundation. WISE is dedicated to enabling the future of education through innovation. Its activities encompass research, capacity-building programs, and advocacy. WISE flagship initiatives include an annual series of research publications, a biennial global summit dubbbed the'Davos of education', the WISE edTech Accelerator, the WISE Innovation Awards, and the WISE Words podcast. Prior to joining WISE in August 2012, Stavros was the Executive Vice-Dean of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy (LKY School) at the National University of Singapore.


Work/Technology 2050: Scenarios and Actions

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National Workshops to Explore Long-range Strategies 7. Collect suggestions from the national planning workshops, distilled in to 93 actions, assess all via five (5) Real-Time Delphi's 8. Final Report for Public Discussion 10.


Ownership dilemma: Who owns the products produced by AI?

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As it is across the world, the amount of investments made in artificial intelligence (AI) and the number of entrepreneurs using AI to develop new projects is also increasing in Turkey. AI facilitates business and production processes and supports automation. This shows that the number of AI start-ups will increase in the coming years. Therefore, Lale Deliveli Alp, one of the founders of Deliveli Alp Law & Consultancy, answered the following questions to make young entrepreneurs' work easier: By what legal means are AI software developed by technology companies protected? Is it possible to patent a developed AI? Alp answered the question about which many entrepreneurs wonder with the following response: "It is not possible to patent AI, which is software, in accordance with Article No. 82 in the Industrial Property Law. Computer programs are out of patentability. However, if the developed AI does not function separately from the hardware, it can be patented. For example, the AI of a developed robot can be patented since it cannot be used separately from the robot. It is always possible to protect AI software developed apart from this within the scope of copyright law as explained above."


Saudi Arabia oil attack requires prepping for drone war, report says

FOX News

Saudi officials display what they claim are Iranian cruise missiles and drones used in the attack on Saudi Arabia's oil industry; Benjamin Hall reports from Jerusalem. The attacks on Saudi Arabia's oil fields will drive a massive increase in the need for perimeter security gear, according to a new report. The report, released by IHS Markit earlier this week, says that knowing where drones are at all times is a new reality. While benign drones must be tracked, it is the malicious ones that must be stopped. "Drone attacks are relatively cheap and easy to initiate but can inflict major damage," IHS Markit analyst Oliver Philippou wrote in the note.


Attack on Saudi Arabia oil field would likely not have been stopped by any country: expert

FOX News

The White House weighs its options as Iran warns that a military response could trigger an'all-out war'; chief White House correspondent John Roberts reports. Saudi Arabia defended itself as well as possible from the recent massive attack on its oil facilities -- an attack that the U.S. has blamed on Iran, a military expert said. "I don't think there is any country that could have defended any better than Saudi Arabia did, and that includes the United States," Peter Roberts, director of military sciences at the Royal United Services Institute, told The New York Times. "I don't think there is any country that could have defended any better than Saudi Arabia did, and that includes the United States." Eighteen drones and seven cruise missiles bombarded the facilities in an asault described as a "Pearl Harbor-type" attack.


Najm deploys SAS artificial intelligence and analytics solutions to combat fraud in insurance

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SAS, the market leader in Analytics & Anti-fraud Technologies, and Najm for Insurance Services have announced a technology collaboration that will aim to bring SAS expertise to counter and reduce instances of fraud in Automobile and Motor insurance claims. Officials from both companies signed the agreement at a SAS event in Fairmont Riyadh on Wednesday. With the goal of streamlining claims through application assessment and taking a proactive approach to detect & deter fraud in the business, Najm is looking to improve efficiency in fraud identification, fast claims resettlement as well as the development of better-quality alerts, by utilizing the latest analytics & fraud detection technologies. Utilizing Artificial Intelligence and Machine-Learning technologies, SAS will automate aspects of Najm's claimant profiling, and will aim to complement existing manual processes to detect fraud claims through behavioral responses and automatically assess risk patterns. During the event, Najm CEO Dr. Mohammad Al-Suliman spoke about the partnership with SAS and the company's future plans.


AI a Huge Revolution in the Oil and Gas Industry - Communal News

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AI in Oil & Gas market is expected to grow from an estimated $1.57 billion in 2017 to $2.85 billion by 2022, at a CAGR of 12.66%, from 2017 to 2022. The growth of AI in Oil & Gas market will be mainly driven by the rise in adoption of the big data technology in the Oil & Gas industry to augment E&P capabilities, a significant increase in venture capital investments, and growing need for automation in the Oil & Gas industry, and tremendous pressure to reduce production costs. Software in AI in Oil & Gas market is applicable in upstream Oil & Gas exploration and production activities. The hardware segment in AI in Oil & Gas market is expected to grow swiftly during the forecast period (2017 to 2022), mainly due to the increasing requirement for sophisticated hardware system configurations and components capable of handling massive data, including, but not limited to Tensor Processor Unit (TPU), Graphic Processing Unit (GPU), Resistive Processing Unit (RPU), Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), and Visual Processing Unit (VPU) to install software-based AI capabilities. The upstream AI in Oil and Gas Market is set to grow in the next five years.