AAAI AI-Alert for Jun 18, 2019


Robots may be delivering your Domino's pizza

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

San Francisco restaurants like Creator are leaning on automation to create low cost food. This could be an issue for humans as robots take over jobs. Domino's is taking a new autonomous delivery partnership for a spin. The pizza chain announced Monday it is teaming with robotics company Nuro for a pilot program in Houston later this year. Nuro has developed a custom unmanned vehicle, called the R2, for delivering goods including food and dry cleaning.


Flights delayed as drones fly near East Midlands airport

The Guardian

Detectives have launched an investigation after three drones disrupted flights at an airport during a nearby music festival. Leicestershire police said a pilot of one of the unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) had been interviewed by officers after it was reported to police at 9.30am on Saturday near the Download festival at Donington Park. Two further drones were reported inside the restricted airspace at East Midlands airport at midnight and on Sunday at 1.30pm. Flights were delayed at the airport as a result of the drones. Police said they had carried out inquiries in conjunction with the Civil Aviation Authority and East Midlands airport.


California could become first to limit facial recognition technology; police aren't happy

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

San Francisco supervisors approved a ban on police using facial recognition technology, making it the first city in the U.S. with such a restriction. SAN FRANCISCO – A routine traffic stop goes dangerously awry when a police officer's body camera uses its built-in facial recognition software to misidentify a motorist as a convicted felon. At best, lawsuits are launched. That imaginary scenario is what some California lawmakers are trying to avoid by supporting Assembly Bill 1215, the Body Camera Accountability Act, which would ban the use of facial recognition software in police body cams – a national first if it passes a Senate vote this summer and is signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom. State law enforcement officials here do not now employ the technology to scan those in the line of sight of officers.


Multilingual translation tools spread in Japan with new visa system

The Japan Times

The use of multilingual translation tools is expanding in Japan, where foreign workers are expected to increase in the wake of April's launch of new visa categories. A growing number of local governments, labor unions and other entities have decided to introduce translation tools, which can help foreigners when going through administrative procedures as they allow local officials and other officers to talk to such applicants in their mother languages. "Talking in the applicants' own languages makes it easier to convey our cooperative stance," said an official in Tokyo's Sumida Ward. The ward introduced VoiceBiz, an audio translation app developed by Toppan Printing Co. that covers 30 languages. The app, which can be downloaded onto smartphones and tablet computers, will be used in eight municipalities, including Osaka and Ayase in Kanagawa Prefecture, company officials said.


The Chatbots are Coming!

#artificialintelligence

Chatbots today pop up at websites in smartphone apps; the same technology helps robots, smart speakers, and other machines operate in a more human-like way. The idea of conversing with a computer is nothing new. As far back as the 1960s, a natural language processing program named Eliza matched typed remarks with scripted responses. The software identified key words and responded with phrases that made it seem as though the computer was responding conversationally. Since then, such conversational interfaces--also known as virtual agents--have advanced remarkably due to greater processing power, cloud computing, and ongoing improvements in artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning.


Catfish capitals? Alaska tops the states where your online romance may be a scam

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Summer romance is in the air and the special someone you just met at an online dating site or on social media seems too good to be true. The sad truth is the person just might turn out to be. In fact, your would-be dreamboat could be a "catfisher." Some states have a higher risk than others, it seems. HighSpeedInternet.com has issued a new report "When Love Bites," in which the internet service provider comparison website identified the states where you are most likely to fall prey to these scammers.


How the Google Coral Edge Platform Brings the Power of AI to Devices - The New Stack

#artificialintelligence

The rise of industrial Internet of Things (IoT) and artificial intelligence (AI) are making edge computing significant for enterprises. Many industry verticals such as manufacturing, healthcare, automobile, transportation, and aviation are considering an investment in edge computing. Edge computing is fast becoming the conduit between the devices that generate data and the public cloud that processes the data. In the context of machine learning and artificial intelligence, the public cloud is used for training the models and the edge is utilized for inferencing. To accelerate ML training in the cloud, public cloud vendors such as AWS, Azure, and the Google Cloud Platform (GCP) offer GPU-backed virtual machines.


Robotic surgery is turning out to be an expensive fad

New Scientist

SURGERY performed with the help of a robot has been billed as the next revolution in healthcare: such procedures can be carried out through an incision the width of a finger, causing less scarring and often allowing people to return to their homes more quickly. The UK's National Health Service recently announced plans to spend £50 million on more robotic surgical equipment for operating theatres, and yet the benefits of this high-tech approach are debated.


A robot has learned to use irony and now people like it more

New Scientist

This 30-centimetre-high robot combines nonchalant facial expressions with deadpan delivery in a way that its inventors hope will make it appear more natural. By incorporating irony into its dialogue, they say it could be used to gently break bad news and persuade people to do things they otherwise wouldn't. "Think of a robot in the role of a life style advisor that feels the user should be more active and has to convey this message without appearing rude," says Elisabeth André at Augsburg University.


Engineers use graph networks to accurately predict properties of molecules and crystals

#artificialintelligence

IMAGE: This is a schematic illustration of MEGNet models. Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed new deep learning models that can accurately predict the properties of molecules and crystals. By enabling almost instantaneous property predictions, these deep learning models provide researchers the means to rapidly scan the nearly-infinite universe of compounds to discover potentially transformative materials for various technological applications, such as high-energy-density Li-ion batteries, warm-white LEDs, and better photovoltaics. To construct their models, a team led by nanoengineering professor Shyue Ping Ong at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering used a new deep learning framework called graph networks, developed by Google DeepMind, the brains behind AlphaGo and AlphaZero. Graph networks have the potential to expand the capabilities of existing AI technology to perform complicated learning and reasoning tasks with limited experience and knowledge--something that humans are good at.