educational setting


Google Program Offers Funding for AI, Machine Learning Projects -- THE Journal

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A "smart" wildfire sensor developed by two high school students in Cupertino, CA (Photo: Google) Google has set aside $25 million to fund research work by schools and other organizations using machine learning for "social good." Besides cash, the company's "AI for Social Good" project is also offering support from its artificial intelligence experts, credits and consulting from Google Cloud. Those chosen will also join a "launchpad" accelerator program with mentoring, support and access to Silicon Valley experts. Projects seeking funding need to address a societal challenge and have a clear plan to deploy the AI model for real-world impact. Organizations will have until the end of January 21, 2019 to submit their applications.


New 'Social Good' Google Program Offers Funding for AI, Machine Learning Projects -- Campus Technology

#artificialintelligence

A "smart" wildfire sensor developed by two high school students in Cupertino, CA (Photo: Google) Google has set aside a $25 million pool to fund research work by schools and other organizations using machine learning for "social good." Besides cash, the company's "AI for Social Good" project is also offering support from its artificial intelligence experts, credits and consulting from Google Cloud. Those chosen will also join a "launchpad" accelerator program with mentoring, support and access to Silicon Valley experts. Projects seeking funding need to address a societal challenge and have a clear plan to deploy the AI model for real-world impact. Organizations will have until the end of January 21, 2019 to submit their applications.


A bottom-up view of the state

MIT News

An endless wait in a crowded room. The official's impassive expression while handling a client in need. Exasperating and sometimes infuriating public service bureaucracies are things with which Bernardo Zacka '05, a newly-appointed assistant professor of political science, is well acquainted. "These are episodes where you feel powerless, where the authority you're dealing with doesn't appear to be a person," he says. "One's impression is dealing with the rule of nobody. But even then of course, you are still dealing with someone."


Baglietto, Saxe, and Shoulders ensure grad students thrive

MIT News

The journey through graduate school is rarely straight and smooth. There are challenges and setbacks, students experience varying degrees of doubt and struggle, and many redefine their goals along the way. On this winding path, the guidance of a mentor can make all the difference to a student's sanity and success. Professors Emilio Baglietto, Rebecca Saxe, and Matthew Shoulders were nominated by their graduate students as models of great mentorship, and are among the current slate of honorees for Committed to Caring (C2C). Professor Emilio Baglietto's "unparalleled enthusiasm" for teaching is both contagious and formative of his students' academic development, his advisees say.


Andrew Ng launches 'AI for Everyone,' a new Coursera program aimed at business professionals

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Andrew Ng, a computer scientist who led Google's AI division, Google Brain, and formerly served as vice president and chief scientist at Baidu, is a veritable celebrity in the artificial intelligence (AI) industry. After leaving Baidu, he debuted an online curriculum of classes centered around machine learning -- Deeplearning.ai Ng was the keynote speaker at the AI Frontiers Conference in November 2017, and this year unveiled the AI Fund, a $175 million incubator that backs small teams of experts looking to solve key problems using machine learning. Oh, and he's also chairman of AI cognitive behavioral therapy startup Woebot; sits on the board of driverless car company Drive.ai; Yet somehow, he found time to put together a new online training course -- "AI for Everyone" -- that seeks to demystify AI for business executives.


The many interfaces of computing

MIT News

The new MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing will incorporate the modern tools of computing into disciplines across the Institute. "The college will equip students to be as fluent in computing and AI [artificial intelligence] as they are in their own disciplines -- and ready to use these digital tools wisely and humanely to help make a better world," says MIT President Rafael Reif. As often happens, it appears MIT students are already there. We recently spoke with six undergraduate students who are participating in the Advanced Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (SuperUROP), and found them already thinking deeply about how new computational technologies can be put to use in fields outside of computer science. These students are working on a huge range of problems that share a common theme: Solving them will provide tangible benefits to society.


DIY Tinkerers Harness the Power of Artificial Intelligence

WIRED

In late winter of 1975, a scrap of paper started appearing on bulletin boards around the San Francisco Peninsula. "Are you building your own computer?" it asked. If so, you might like to come to a gathering." The invite drew 32 people to a Menlo Park, California, garage for the first meeting of the Homebrew Computer Club, a community of hobbyists intrigued by the potential of a newly affordable component called the microprocessor. One was a young engineer named Steve Wozniak, who later brought a friend named Steve Jobs into the club.



Robot learns to use hand gestures including pointing by watching 52 hours of TED talk videos

Daily Mail

Scientists have taught a robot how to use human-like hand gestures while speaking by feeding it footage of people giving presentations. The android learned to use a pointing gesture to portray'you' or'me', as well as a crooked arm action to suggest holding something. Building robots that gesticulate like humans will make interactions with them feel more natural, the Korean team behind the technology said. They built the robot around machine learning software that they showed 52 hours of TED talks - presentations given by expert speakers on various topics. Pictured is a Pepper robot that scientists taught to give human-like hand gestures during speech.


Robots are learning hand gestures by watching hours of TED talks

New Scientist

We say a lot with our hands. We spread them wide to indicate size, stab the air for emphasis and reach out to draw people in. Waving our hands about when we speak makes us appear less robotic – and that's true for robots too.