educational setting


FinEduAI Artificial Intelligence project at Finnish high schools

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Neural Net Worth

Communications of the ACM

When Geoffrey Hinton started doing graduate student work on artificial intelligence at the University of Edinburgh in 1972, the idea that it could be achieved using neural networks that mimicked the human brain was in disrepute. Computer scientists Marvin Minsky and Seymour Papert had published a book in 1969 on Perceptrons, an early attempt at building a neural net, and it left people in the field with the impression that such devices were nonsense. "It didn't actually say that, but that's how the community interpreted the book," says Hinton who, along with Yoshua Bengio and Yann LeCun, will receive the 2018 ACM A.M. Turing award for their work that led deep neural networks to become an important component of today's computing. "People thought I was just completely crazy to be working on neural nets." Even in the 1980s, when Bengio and LeCun entered graduate school, neural nets were not seen as promising.


Machine Learning & Data Science Masterclass in Python and R

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Regression, Classification and much more.HOT & NEW 4.8 (7 ratings) 161 students enrolled Created by Denis Panjuta What you'll learn Create machine learning applications in Python as well as R Apply Machine Learning to own data You will learn Machine Learning clearly and concisely Learn with real data: Many practical examples (spam filter, is fungus edible or poisonous etc. ...) No dry mathematics - everything explained vividly Use popular tools like Sklearn, and Caret You will know when to use which machine learning model This course contains over 200 lessons, quizzes, practical examples, ... - the easiest way if you want to learn Machine Learning. Step by step I teach you machine learning. In each section you will learn a new topic - first the idea / intuition behind it, and then the code in both Python and R. Machine Learning is only really fun when you evaluate real data. That's why you analyze a lot of practical examples in this course: Create machine learning applications in Python as well as R Apply Machine Learning to own data You will learn Machine Learning clearly and concisely Learn with real data: Many practical examples (spam filter, is fungus edible or poisonous etc. ...) No dry mathematics - everything explained vividly Use popular tools like Sklearn, and Caret You will know when to use which machine learning model Learn with real data: Many practical examples (spam filter, is fungus edible or poisonous etc. ...)


Build your own best friend! Students design $3,000 kit robo-dog that can jump, flip and dance

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A robotic dog that can dance, do flips and jump has been created by a team of students - and they are encouraging people to build their own. The robo-dog senses when it is out of position and uses'virtual springs' to pop upright with precision. It has been created with the goal of being reproduced by anyone and the team has published their designs and blueprints online to encourage people to make their own robots. Doggo's creators wanted to share their joy so much they have made the plans, code and a supply list all freely available on GitHub, a specialist platform for developers to share computer code. On the Stanford Doggo Project Github blog, the students describe themselves as undergraduate and graduate students in the Stanford Student Robotics club and part of the club's'Extreme Mobility team'.


How AI could save lives without spilling secrets

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The potential for artificial intelligence to transform health care is huge, but there's a big catch. AI algorithms will need vast amounts of medical data on which to train before machine learning can deliver powerful new ways to spot and understand the cause of disease. That means imagery, genomic information, or electronic health records--all potentially very sensitive information. That's why researchers are working on ways to let AI learn from large amounts of medical data while making it very hard for that data to leak. One promising approach is now getting its first big test at Stanford Medical School in California.


Artificial intelligence: eight tips for business leaders

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The most important thing for executives is to just start engaging with AI today – tomorrow is not good enough," warns Shamus Rae, partner and head of digital disruption at KPMG UK. "Business leaders need to understand the capabilities of these new technologies and put in place an AI strategy that includes some clear self-challenge. This ensures that they don't get stuck in'play' mode and fail to make any tangible change to their operations or business model." Mr Rae predicts that, due to the common misconception of AI, "we will see some major missteps by household names failing to adapt fast enough". "Think hard about what problem in your business you want to solve, not with artificial intelligence but with data," advises Kim Nilsson, founder and chief executive of data science hub Pivigo. "The solution always needs to come from that intersection of where your business challenges overlap with available data sets.


Science Is Facing A Brain Drain

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Science is facing a major generational issue in the coming years, and it's all our fault. For decades it's been the case that there are way more people interested in careers in science than there are permanent positions for them. There are a lot of undergrads, with some of them moving on to grad school. And some of those grad students will go on to take postdoctoral research positions, and some of the best and brightest postdocs will end up as distinguished members of faculty at respectable institutions. It's set up almost like a competition.


Robot copies Mona Lisa sketch just by looking at it - Futurity

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You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4.0 International license. A new algorithm enables robots to put pen to paper, writing words using stroke patterns similar to human handwriting. It's a step, the researchers say, toward robots that are able to communicate more fluently with human coworkers and collaborators. "Just by looking at a target image of a word or sketch, the robot can reproduce each stroke as one continuous action," says Atsunobu Kotani, an undergraduate student at Brown University who led the algorithm's development. "That makes it hard for people to distinguish if it was written by the robot or actually written by a human."


Microsoft invests in seven AI projects to help people with disabilities

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Over the next year, the recipients will work on things like a nerve-sensing wearable wristband. Another project seeks to develop a wearable cap that reads a person's EEG data and communicates it to the cloud to provide seizure warnings and alerts. Other tools will rely on speech recognition, AI-powered chatbots and apps for people with vision impairment. This year's grantees include the University of California, Berkeley; Massachusetts Eye and Ear, a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School; Voiceitt in Israel; Birmingham City University in the United Kingdom; University of Sydney in Australia; Pison Technology of Boston; and Our Ability, of Glenmont, New York. "What stands out the most about this round of grantees is how so many of them are taking standard AI capabilities, like a chatbot or data collection, and truly revolutionizing the value of technology," Microsoft's Senior Accessibility Architect Mary Bellard said in a blog post.


Want to be a data scientist? This online bootcamp is on sale for $10.

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Heads up: All products featured here are selected by Mashable's commerce team and meet our rigorous standards for awesomeness. If you buy something, Mashable may earn an affiliate commission. Nearly seven years after the Harvard Business Review first gave it the title, Data Scientist is still arguably the sexiest job out there. LinkedIn reports that demand for these highly skilled workers is ridiculously high, and according to the company review site Glassdoor -- which recently named the position its Best Job in America for 2019 -- the same can be said for their salaries. Your typical U.S. data scientist earns an average base pay of $117,345 a year.