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An Ontological Architecture for Orbital Debris Data

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The orbital debris problem presents an opportunity for inter-agency and international cooperation toward the mutually beneficial goals of debris prevention, mitigation, remediation, and improved space situational awareness (SSA). Achieving these goals requires sharing orbital debris and other SSA data. Toward this, I present an ontological architecture for the orbital debris domain, taking steps in the creation of an orbital debris ontology (ODO). The purpose of this ontological system is to (I) represent general orbital debris and SSA domain knowledge, (II) structure, and standardize where needed, orbital data and terminology, and (III) foster semantic interoperability and data-sharing. In doing so I hope to (IV) contribute to solving the orbital debris problem, improving peaceful global SSA, and ensuring safe space travel for future generations.


The Curiosity rover and other spacecraft are learning to think for themselves

Popular Science

It takes up to 24 minutes for a signal to travel between Earth and Mars. If you're a Mars rover wondering which rock to drill into, that means waiting at least 48 minutes to send images of your new location to NASA and then receive marching orders. It's a lot of idle time for a robot that cost $2.6 billion to build. That's why engineers are increasingly giving spacecraft the ability to make their own decisions. Space robots have long been able to control certain onboard systems--to regulate power usage, for example--but artificial intelligence is now giving rovers and orbiters the ability to collect and analyze science data, then decide what info to send back to Earth, without any human input.


NASA Astronauts On ISS To Make Emergency Spacewalk Tuesday To Replace Faulty Component

International Business Times

A multiplexer-demultiplexer (MDM) data relay box aboard the International Space Station failed Saturday, and will be replaced Tuesday during a spacewalk by NASA astronauts Peggy Whitson and Jack Fischer, the space agency announced Sunday. The two-hour "contingency spacewalk" has been given the go-ahead by program managers of the ISS. The MDM data relay box is housed in the S0 truss, and is one of the two such systems, both of which are redundant -- which is to say, both boxes are independent and one can take over in the event the other fails. MDM-1, the failed data relay box, apparently malfunctioned shortly after noon Saturday. Crewmembers tried to restore power to the component multiple times, but were not successful.


UK driverless vehicle tests begin in London

The Independent - Tech

Driverless pods have started started carrying members of the public around in North Greenwich, London, as part of the GATEway Project. The autonomous vehicles aren't fitted with a steering wheel or a brake pedal, and instead use a collection of five cameras and three lasers to detect and avoid obstacles on a two-mile route near the O2. They can see up to 100m ahead and are capable of performing an emergency stop if necessary, though they have a top speed of just 10mph. The prototype pods being used in Greenwich can carry four passengers at a time, but each of them will have a trained person on board during the three-week trial. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph.


Uber pulls self-driving cars off the road after Arizona crash

The Independent - Tech

Uber has suspended its self-driving car operations after one of its vehicles was involved in a crash in Arizona. The accident left one of the company's driverless Volvos on its side, but fortunately led to no serious injuries. A picture of the crash scene shows two other damaged cars sitting next to the Volvo, one of which has smashed windows and particularly bad dent marks, suggesting the accident happened at some speed. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph. The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar.


Windows 10 updates: How to test new features before everyone else

The Independent - Tech

Microsoft is currently finalising a major new update to Windows 10 that looks set to arrive in April, but users can try it out ahead of its launch. The Creators Update will introduce a raft of new features, including Paint 3D, Beam game streaming, new accessibility features, including braille support, as well as a multitude of performance and security tweaks and enhancements. In order to get a taste of them before they officially arrive, Windows 10 users can join Microsoft's Windows 10 Insider Program. Doing so gives you access to all of the latest Windows 10 builds as soon as they're available, and you can help shape the future of the operating system by providing feedback on the new features. However, before joining the Windows 10 Insider Program, be aware that you'll be signing up to use unfinished pre-release software that might not work as it's supposed to.


Brexit is less stressful than losing your smartphone, study finds

The Independent - Tech

British adults feel more stressed about the prospect of losing their smartphone than they do about Brexit, according to a new study conducted by the Physiological Society. The Stress in modern Britain survey asked people to rate how stressful they find โ€“ or imagine they would find โ€“ 18 different life events, with the Physiological Society using the results to assign an average score to each one from a scale of zero to ten, with zero meaning'Not at all stressful' and ten'Very stressful'. Smartphone loss came 14th on the list, with a score of 5.79, making it more stressful than Brexit (4.23), but slightly less stressful than terrorist threats (5.84). The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar. Japan's On-Art Corp's CEO Kazuya Kanemaru poses with his company's eight metre tall dinosaur-shaped mechanical suit robot'TRX03' and other robots during a demonstration in Tokyo, Japan Japan's On-Art Corp's eight metre tall dinosaur-shaped mechanical suit robot'TRX03' performs during its unveiling in Tokyo, Japan Singulato Motors co-founder and CEO Shen Haiyin poses in his company's concept car Tigercar P0 at a workshop in Beijing, China A picture shows Singulato Motors' concept car Tigercar P0 at a workshop in Beijing, China Connected company president Shigeki Tomoyama addresses a press briefing as he elaborates on Toyota's "connected strategy" in Tokyo.


Donald Trump Muslim ban: Apple, Google and other tech giants mysteriously drop off list of companies opposing order

The Independent - Tech

Companies including Apple, Facebook and Google have mysteriously stopped opposing Donald Trump's Muslim ban. The first time it was proposed, almost every major tech company publicly filed briefs against the order. But after it was brought back in a slightly less extreme form, the biggest companies have dropped their opposition to it. A group of 58 technology companies, including Airbnb, Lyft and Dropbox, filed a "friend of the court" brief in the case saying the second order hurt their ability to recruit the best talent from around the world. But that was much shorter than the initial list of companies, which included Apple, Facebook and Google โ€“ which filed a brief opposing the first ban in a different court challenge brought by Washington state, which is ongoing.


Yahoo hack: Russia denies involvement after US charges two FSB officers over 'state-sponsored' cyber attack

The Independent - Tech

The Russian government says that its agents weren't involved in hacking 500 million Yahoo accounts after the US charged two spies two spies over a "state-sponsored" cyber attack. The Kremlin said its FSB domestic intelligence service was not involved in any unlawful activity. It appeared to suggest that no Russian intelligence agents have ever hacked anyone else. This week it emerged that the US Department of Justice would charge two Russian spies with hacking into Yahoo in one of the biggest cyber attacks in history. It said that FSB agents had paid hackers to steal people's email accounts and try and gather information about journalists and politicians.


Technology could DESTROY humanity claims Stephen Hawking

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Technology must be controlled in order to safeguard the future of humanity, Stephen Hawking has warned. The physicist, who has spoken out about the dangers of artificial intelligence in the past, says a'world government' could be our only hope. He says our'logic and reason' could be the only way to defeat the growing threat of nuclear or biological war. We are living through the most dangerous time in the history of the human race, according to Professor Stephen Hawking. 'Since civilisation began, aggression has been useful inasmuch as it has definite survival advantages,' he told The Times. 'It is hard-wired into our genes by Darwinian evolution.