road


How to Make Self-Driving Cars See the World Like Humans, and Other News From the Week in Cars

WIRED

Amidst the robocar hype, it's easy to forget that for all their powers, computers are still lousy drivers compared to humans. This week, Eric Adams introduced us to the people working to interpret hominid behavior for driving robots. Turns out perception is a remarkable, variegated thing, and cars need to learn how to do all the cool stuff we the fleshy can before performing seamlessly on the road. The same goes for companies. Google parent company Alphabet announced this week it will construct a techified neighborhood in Toronto.


To Survive the Streets, Self-Driving Cars Have to Start Thinking Like Humans

#artificialintelligence

Next time you're driving down the road or walking down the street, pause to consider how you read your surroundings. How you pay extra attention to the kid kicking a soccer ball around her front lawn and the slightly wobbly, nervous looking cyclist. How you deprioritize the woman striding toward the street, knowing she's heading for the group of friends waving to her from the sidewalk. You make these calls by drawing on a lifetime of social and cultural experience so ingrained you hardly need to think about it. But imagine you're an autonomous car trying to do the same thing, without that accumulated knowledge or the shared humanity that lets you read others' nuanced behavioral cues.


Toyota's new self-driving cars will chat with drivers

#artificialintelligence

In brief: Toyota's Concept-i vehicles, equipped with its AI virtual assistant called Yui, are going to hit the roads for trial runs in 2020. The Japanese carmaker wants to make waves in the future of transportation. Toyota's Concept-i vehicles, equipped with its AI virtual assistant called Yui, are going to hit the roads for trial runs in 2020. The Japanese carmaker wants to make waves in the future of transportation. After unveiling a concept model for a new line of autonomous vehicles, Toyota expects to start testing these driverless cars in 2020.


To Survive the Streets, Self-Driving Cars Must Learn to Think Like Humans

WIRED

Next time you're driving down the road or walking down the street, pause to consider how you read your surroundings. How you pay extra attention to the kid kicking a soccer ball around her front lawn and the slightly wobbly, nervous looking cyclist. How you deprioritize the woman striding toward the street, knowing she's heading for the group of friends waving to her from the sidewalk. You make these calls by drawing on a lifetime of social and cultural experience so ingrained you hardly need to think about it. But imagine you're an autonomous car trying to do the same thing, without that accumulated knowledge or the shared humanity that lets you read others' nuanced behavioral cues.


AI-first marketing could help brands perfect the customer experience

#artificialintelligence

In the midst of all the hype about artificial intelligence, you may occasionally pause to ask: "What's new here?" After all, did we not have machine learning applications 10 (or maybe even 20) years ago? In the marketing domain specifically, you may be asking how today's AI is different from, say, an application that has been personalizing real-time content insertion for several years. Do you have an AI strategy -- or hoping to get one? Check out VB Summit on October 23-24 in Berkeley, a high-level, invite-only AI event for business leaders.


Here's the math that Intel claims proves self-driving cars are safe

Mashable

The auto industry believes self-driving cars are the future of transportation and could be a key factor in preventing accidents, but the public is wary of autonomous vehicles (AVs). So companies are looking to find new ways to convince consumers that driverless cars are a good idea. Now, Intel says it can actually demonstrate exactly how safe AVs can be -- and believes it has the math to prove it. Amnon Shashua, who is the SVP of Intel's Autonomous Driving Group and CEO of recently acquired Mobileye, just published an academic paper that claims to provide a mathematical formula that can be applied to AVs to make sure that they won't cause accidents on the road. Intel and Mobileye also released a "layman's summary paper" on the formula, for those of us who never advanced beyond basic algebra.


Where we're going, we won't need roads

Popular Science

"We're about to have a kid, and I don't think she's ever going to get her driver's license," says Scott Kubly, director of the Seattle Department of Transportation. "Based on where we are technologically, there just won't be a need." In August, right before Kubly went on paternity leave, his agency released a 48-page report titled "The New Mobility Playbook" (complete with 147 pages of appendices). In it, SDOT presents a comprehensive plan for dealing with a future in which cars autonomously pilot passengers to work right alongside the city's buses, trains, and taxis. Seattle isn't alone in thinking this way.


Baidu to hit the road with self-driving bus

Daily Mail

Baidu chief executive Robin Li on Tuesday said the Chinese internet giant will have a self-driving bus on the road soon as it races for a lead in autonomous vehicles. Baidu is collaborating with an array of companies on autonomous cars, and is working with a large bus maker in China to have a self-driving bus running a route by next year, Li said in an on-stage interview late Tuesday at The Wall Street Journal D.Live conference in Laguna Beach, California. Most major automakers and technology titans including Google-parent Alphabet have been stepping up efforts on autonomous driving in recent years, convinced that these systems could eliminate most road accidents. Baidu's search engine dominates the Chinese internet, and online ads are a key revenue stream. But since a crackdown by authorities on Baidu's online advertising business after a much-publicized scandal over promoting a fake medical treatment, 'China's Google' is seeking to focus on artificial intelligence and is investing heavily in the sector.


Canada is officially testing driverless cars on public streets

#artificialintelligence

Canada is celebrating a technological milestone after its first official self-driving car test on public roads last week. The street test was conducted in Ottawa's west end using technology developed by Blackberry. The city of Ottawa announced a partnership with Blackberry's QNX team, the operating system arm of the company which is developing self-driving vehicle software. "With support from BlackBerry QNX and its Autonomous Vehicle Innovation Center and by working closely with all our partners, we are facilitating smart initiatives and research, and fuelling innovation and job creation in Ottawa," said the city's mayor, Jim Watson in a press release. The test was not run in real-life conditions as the roads were closed during the demonstration.


Look, Ma, no hands: Cadillac's new Super Cruise semi-autonomous driving system

Los Angeles Times

Cadillac is in the middle of a massive marketing campaign to introduce its new Super Cruise. The semi-autonomous driving system, available only on the CT6 luxury sedan, is being billed as offering the "first true hands-free driving on the freeway." The car company has sent CT6 sedans literally across the country, holding events in multiple U.S. cities, offering auto journalists short Super Cruise seminars followed by a turn behind the wheel. The system is highly sophisticated. Using a combination of Lidar, high-resolution GPS and a Driver Attention System that monitors the driver, Super Cruise will allow the car -- on certain roads, under certain conditions -- to travel great distances without any steering wheel input by its operator.