Goto

Collaborating Authors

ce 2021


CES 2021: AI, Cloud Computing, and Digital Health Booming

#artificialintelligence

The global pandemic has forced all of us to go digital and online events are no longer uncommon, even when it comes to global shows such as CES. As one of the world's most influential tech events, CES is where breakthrough technologies converge, the sharpest innovators hit the stage, and the world's biggest brands do business. CES 2021 made history as the largest virtual tech event. It featured every aspect of the tech sector and covered over 40 product categories including AI, IoT and sensors, 5G connectivity, AR and VR, blockchain, digital health, drones, fintech, e-commerce, robotics, smart homes, and smart cities. Almost 2,000 companies launched their products during this event. Auriga certainly could not miss this first-ever all-digital CES 2021 and joined over 80,000 attendees from 167 countries to network with the global tech community, meet new prospects and partners, experience innovation, and discover new takeaways.


At CES 2021, laptops go beyond the 2-in-1

ZDNet

When compared to the Vegas spectacle, virtual CES had its advantages, including reprieves from sensory overload, cigarette smoke, endless walks through disorienting casinos and narrow exhibit hall aisles, and bombardments of me-too offerings in saturated categories. And keynotes and panels made the transition well. But it also fell short in a few key ways, including the serendipity of meeting an old colleague, someone with common interests, and a product or service that inspired new possibilities. That last point was particularly true for products in smaller or emerging categories, especially from startups. Today's CES is as much a showcase for the latest business technology as it is for consumer electronics.


ICYMI: More gadget highlights from CES 2021

Engadget

While CES was a bit different this year, we still managed to check out a number of inspiring new devices, apps and services. While we acknowledged the most promising tech in Engadget's Best of CES awards, there remain a bunch of gadgets that didn't make the list that will be worth checking out when they actually hit shelves later this year. Things like HP's new Dragonfly laptops, TCL's 8K TVs and Cowin's two-piece soundbar are all things to look forward to as 2021 progresses (and some are even available already). Here are some of the CES 2021 gadgets you may have missed this week. Cherlynn Low found a lot to like about last year's HP Dragonfly laptop: it was lightweight at 2.2 pounds, had a great battery life and an attractive design.


Robotics trends at #CES2021

Robohub

Even massive events like the 54th edition of Consumer Electronics Show (CES) have gone virtual due to the current pandemic. Since 1967, the Consumer Technology Association (CTA), which is the North American trade association for the consumer technology industry, has been organising the fair, and this year was not going to be any different--well, except they had to take the almost 300,000m${} 2$ from CES 2020 to the cloud. In this post, I mainly put the focus on current and future hardware/robotics trends presented at CES 2021 (because we all love to make predictions, even during uncertain times). "Innovation accelerates and bunches up during economic downturns only to be unleashed as the economy begins to recover, ushering in powerful waves of technological change"--Christopher Freeman, British Economist. With this quote, I start the first session on'my show' of CES 2021, 'Tech trends to watch' by CTA (see their slides here).


Flying cars, smart beds: 5 things I'd actually buy from CES 2021

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Despite the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) taking place online for the first time in its 54-year history, the all-digital 2021 CES still served as a window to the near future, featuring more than 1,800 exhibitors showcasing their wares – virtually speaking. Granted, it can be tougher to assess how impressive these products are without seeing them with your own eyes – like the latest TV technologies or self-driving cars – but the show managed to surprise and delight with several innovative offerings. As an annual tradition during CES, the following is a few gadgets I'd actually shell out money for – even if they're not available for a long while. Galaxy S21 or iPhone 12?:How Samsung and Apple smartphones stack up Teased by Samsung earlier in the week, Bot Handy is a domestic robot that can roam around your home to perform chores – such as picking up clothes from the floor or loading the dishwasher – but my favorite feature is pouring a glass of wine and bringing it to you. After all, after the year we've just endured, who wouldn't want this kind of high-tech pampering.


4K may be the present, but 8K TVs showed us the future at CES 2021

Mashable

It feels like 4K is just barely getting started and 8K is already one-upping it. At the all-virtual version of CES this year, most of the biggest names in TV manufacturing like Sony and LG trotted out their upcoming wares. While the majority of the TVs shown maxed out at 4K resolution (which is still gorgeous and is supported by more movies and video games than 8K), there were a few sets that went above and beyond. Companies like Samsung and TCL proved that 8K is real and it's here -- just in time go to along with the PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X, both of which will support it as soon as 8K games start existing. If you're unfamiliar with the distinction between 4K and 8K, you can brush up with our explainer, but the main thing you need to know is that it has 16 times the number of pixels as a 1080p display. If that sounds appealing to you, here are some of the coolest 8K TVs shown off at CES this year.


The best tech of CES 2021 isn't real

Mashable

Even though CES 2021 was fully virtual, we still saw tons of new devices, including laptops, drones, TVs, wearables, smart home gadgets, and more. But this was also the year we saw a lot of product concepts. You see, the "beauty" of shows like CES is the ability write about our hands-on experiences with products. But since we couldn't roam the halls of CES in person this year, it was the perfect time for brands to announce gadgets that weren't ready for store shelves. And, it turns out these concepts were actually the best tech of CES, too.


The Best of CES 2021: Gadgets From the All-Digital Tech Show

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

CES 2021 was unlike any trade show we've ever experienced. Due to Covid-19, it was "all digital," which really meant "mostly websites." To find the hot stuff this year, we didn't wander the millions of square feet of the Las Vegas Convention Center and surrounding facilities, but instead watched streamed presentations, combed through hundreds of exhibitors' "digital activations" and, of course, heard plenty of pitches from entrepreneurs and marketing folks eager to keep us in the loop--global pandemic or not. That means we weren't able to touch and feel the innovations like in years past--although we did get some stuff sent to our homes. Still, it hasn't stopped us from bringing you the craziest, coolest and kookiest gadgets we could find.


Best of CES 2021: The smart home and home entertainment products that captured our attention

PCWorld

If you think judging a product based on what you can see and hear in a jampacked and noisy convention center is hard, imagine doing it over a Zoom connection. That being said, these smart home and home entertainment products impressed us despite the limitations of the venue. The products below are presented in alphabetical order. If you'd like to see everything we checked out at CES 2021, just click here. Wait, three thousand bucks for a doggie door?


Masks, sanitizers, and social distancing gadgets: The COVID tech that dominated CES 2021

Mashable

With virtual booths and digital portals taking the place of convention center halls and showcases, CES in the time of coronavirus looked different. So did some of the tech. COVID-oriented tech products stood out at this year's CES. Some brands debuted new products made for the pandemic, others found that items they'd been working on all along now have newfound applications and relevance. But is "COVID tech" really necessary? After all, the best way to slow the spread of the virus is to practice social distancing and wear a face mask, which can be as simple as a bandana or a repurposed old T-shirt -- fundamentally low-tech strategies.