artificial intelligence


The AI Future for Human Resources Is Already Here

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Far from science fiction, artificial intelligence is rapidly becoming a part of Human Resources practices. Artificial intelligence is being designed into every transactional application. No vendor conversation is without a discussion of how the technology is AI enabled. How can you tell the difference? And what is the future for HR as AI applications increasingly take over so much of the work in very area from benefits and performance to recruiting, sourcing and succession?


The first AI universe sim is fast and accurate -- and its creators don't know how it works

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For the first time, astrophysicists have used artificial intelligence techniques to generate complex 3D simulations of the universe. The results are so fast, accurate and robust that even the creators aren't sure how it all works. "We can run these simulations in a few milliseconds, while other'fast' simulations take a couple of minutes," says study co-author Shirley Ho, a group leader at the Flatiron Institute's Center for Computational Astrophysics in New York City and an adjunct professor at Carnegie Mellon University. The speed and accuracy of the project, called the Deep Density Displacement Model, or D3M for short, wasn't the biggest surprise to the researchers. The real shock was that D3M could accurately simulate how the universe would look if certain parameters were tweaked -- such as how much of the cosmos is dark matter -- even though the model had never received any training data where those parameters varied.


The first AI universe sim is fast and accurate -- and its creators don't know how it works

#artificialintelligence

For the first time, astrophysicists have used artificial intelligence techniques to generate complex 3D simulations of the universe. The results are so fast, accurate and robust that even the creators aren't sure how it all works. "We can run these simulations in a few milliseconds, while other'fast' simulations take a couple of minutes," says study co-author Shirley Ho, a group leader at the Flatiron Institute's Center for Computational Astrophysics in New York City and an adjunct professor at Carnegie Mellon University. The speed and accuracy of the project, called the Deep Density Displacement Model, or D3M for short, wasn't the biggest surprise to the researchers. The real shock was that D3M could accurately simulate how the universe would look if certain parameters were tweaked -- such as how much of the cosmos is dark matter -- even though the model had never received any training data where those parameters varied.


Artificial Intelligence to Improve Patient Care

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In partnership with local health insurer, CDPHP, researchers from the Institute for Data Exploration and Applications (IDEA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are using artificial intelligence to improve patient health by developing a better understanding of high needs patients and identifying aspects of care that lead to better outcomes. "It's not enough to just figure out who are the highest needs patients, you really need to know why and what approaches can help them," said Kristin Bennett, a Rensselaer math professor and associate director of IDEA. "Our approach develops explainable models that help us understand who these high needs patients are, why some people in this group do well, and some do not." The project builds on the "cadre" modeling technique developed by Bennett. As opposed to deep learning, in which a computer identifies a pattern but the path to its decision is not clear, cadre models bring another level of understanding into the equation.


The White Paper by Satoshi Nakamoto review – the future of cryptocurrency

The Guardian

Eight years ago, Visa, Mastercard and PayPal, which together make up more than 97% of the global market for payment services, cut off funding to WikiLeaks (you could still donate to the Ku Klux Klan, the English Defence League or Americans for Truth about Homosexuality). The blockade, backed by Republican senators, was political: WikiLeaks had published Chelsea Manning's material documenting US military drone strikes and civilian killings in Iraq; stopping inflowing cash silenced Julian Assange's outfit, albeit temporarily. Perhaps it was time for a cryptocurrency to stride from the proverbial phone booth, underpants over its tights, and save the day? After all, bitcoin's philosophy was that it would cut out the middleman, whether state functionary or corporate lackey, and realise a radical future in which, for instance, Afghan women, prohibited from opening bank accounts, might work and get paid in bitcoin. Certainly, in December 2010 there was much enthusiasm from cypherpunks for WikiLeaks to link to bitcoin on their website for donations.


Rapid robot rollout risks UK workers being left behind, reports say

The Guardian

British workers are being shut out of decisions over the rising use of robots in the UK economy, according to a report. According to the commission on workers and technology, run by the Fabian Society and the Community trade union, almost six in 10 employees across Britain in a poll said their employers did not give them a say on the use of new technologies. Risking a future where workers' jobs get worse and people's voices go unheard over changes in the workplace, the findings come as a separate report finds the use of robots in poorer regions triggers the loss of almost twice as many jobs as in wealthier ones. In a study by the consultancy firm Oxford Economics, the rapidly growing use of robots is expected to have a profound impact on jobs across the world, resulting in up to 20m manufacturing job losses by 2030. Around 1.7m manufacturing jobs have already been lost to robots since 2000, according to the study, including as many as 400,000 in Europe, 260,000 in the US and 550,000 in China.


Amazon is watching, listening and tracking you. Here's how to stop it

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Tech columnist Kim Komando shows you the settings you need to change on Amazon settings to safeguard your privacy. Amazon is not only watching over your shopping, TV viewing, music listening and book reading histories, it's also listening to you at home, or in the car. At least that's how it is in my household, where I have two Amazon Echo speakers – one in the kitchen and another in the garage, plus a car accessory to bring the Alexa personal assistant along with me on drives. I don't have a lot of smart home devices, but if I did, Amazon would have access to my doorbell and security – who's coming and going – and more. At the Amazon CES booth in 2019, the e-tailer showed off many products that work with Alexa.


I travelled to a future where AI cameras track your every move

New Scientist

I AM staring into the future of security… and it thinks I'm under 15 years old. Inside a giant hall are hundreds of stands with companies showing off their technology, from artificially intelligent video analysis to fingerprint scanners that could replace credit cards. "The words'security', 'AI' and'deep learning' are everywhere, but'privacy' is nowhere in sight" "Deep learning", "security" and "AI" are emblazoned on multiple banners throughout IFSEC, a large security conference at the ExCeL exhibition centre in London. Booths are laden with high-end security cameras, but, tellingly, the word "privacy" is nowhere in sight.


AIs that diagnose diseases are starting to assist and replace doctors

New Scientist

ARTIFICIALLY intelligent doctors are here. Thousands of people in the US and Europe have already been screened by an AI system for detecting diabetes-related blindness without the involvement of a human doctor. The system was approved last year after it outperformed trained professionals in a trial. More AI tests will kick off in the next few years. They look set to improve the diagnosis of many conditions, from breast and lung cancer to broken wrists and glaucoma.


Neural Code Search: ML-based code search using natural language queries

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Engineers work best when they can easily find code examples to guide them on particular coding tasks. For some questions -- for example, "How to programmatically close or hide the Android soft keyboard?" But questions specific to proprietary code or APIs (or code written in less common programming languages) need a different solution, since they are not typically discussed in those forums. To address this need, we've developed a code search tool that applies natural language processing (NLP) and information retrieval (IR) techniques directly to source code text. This tool, called Neural Code Search (NCS), accepts natural language queries and returns relevant code fragments retrieved directly from the code corpus.