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Alzheimer's breakthrough: Two short strings of amino acids could pave the way to new treatments

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Two years after discovering a way to neutralize a rogue protein linked to Alzheimer's disease, University of Alberta Distinguished University Professor and neurologist Jack Jhamandas has found a new piece of the Alzheimer's puzzle, bringing him closer to a treatment for the disease. In a study published in Scientific Reports, Jhamandas and his team found two short peptides, or strings of amino acids, that when injected into mice with Alzheimer's disease daily for five weeks, significantly improved the mice's memory. The treatment also reduced some of the harmful physical changes in the brain that are associated with the disease. "In the mice that received the drugs, we found less amyloid plaque buildup and a reduction in brain inflammation," said Jhamandas, who is also a member of the Neuroscience and Mental Health Institute. "So this was very interesting and exciting because it showed us that not only was memory being improved in the mice, but signs of brain pathology in Alzheimer's disease were also greatly improved. That was a bit of a surprise for us."


Researchers find potential groundbreaking Alzheimer's drug

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Researchers may have discovered the'ground zero' of Alzheimer's disease, paving the way to treatment that could halt condition in its tracks. A team of scientists at the University of North Carolina's Medical School conducted a series of experiments to look at different factors driving the disease in order to try and pinpoint a way to stop it in its tracks. Alzheimer's disease causes abnormal deposits of amyloid beta protein and tau protein in the brain, as well as swarms of activated immune cells. The team of researchers used different experiments to look at how the proteins and activated immune cells attack the brain and cause Alzheimer's-related symptoms. The drug, called tubastatin A, is currently undergoing late stage clinical trials at a number of hospitals around the United States.