Scientist


Google Is Using The Eclipse To Improve Its Machine Learning

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This fleet of photographers will send their images to Google, which will use an algorithm it created to stitch the images together into what it calls an "Eclipse Megamovie" showing a time-expanded video of the total solar eclipse as it crosses North America. The idea is to gather a rich data set around the first total solar eclipse to cross a large portion of the United States in almost 100 years. Technology has changed exponentially in the last century; this rare cosmic event is the first time many will experience a total eclipse, and it's also an opportunity to experience it with new technology. The initiative is in collaboration with a group of scientists led by University of California, Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory, who came up with the idea of crowdsourcing an image archive of next week's total solar eclipse back in 2011.


Scientists create Terminator-style robot with self-healing 'flesh'

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THE human-like abilities of robots continue to develop at incredible pace – with droids now being seen to chase targets and even fire guns. To create these flesh-like robots, the scientists used jelly-like polymers that meld together when heated and cooled. Killer robots might seem like a long time away from becoming reality but experts have raised concerns that our foes' might use them to build super-strong armies of the future. Healey told the House Armed Services Committee the development of cyborg squads of fighters will happen in the next decade.


A New Beginning to Deep Learning

@machinelearnbot

You just don't think too much as to why can you'see' things, 'hear' things, 'say' things, 'understand' things, whereas things can't do the same. We're trying to make machines see, hear, understand, learn and most importantly, learn from previous mistakes. Deep Learning is worthy of all the credit for the latest and daily advances in computer vision, speech recognition, natural language processing, audio recognition and what not! My aim here is to give that context and make research papers or rather concepts easy to understand.


Why Scientists Should Have Leadership Skills

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The impact of science can continue to grow provided our scientists and science professionals are equipped with skills to create an innovative, sustainable and prosperous future. Specifically, a Future of Jobs report by the World Economic Forum indicates that, by 2020, the skills most sought after by employers will include problem solving, creative thinking, emotional intelligence and interpersonal skills. Leadership education can directly enhance the employability of science graduates, as leadership skills are often the same transferable skills sought by employers. We have recently found that science students choose to enhance their science degree with leadership education specifically to increase their employability and job opportunities outside of science.


Capital Markets trends: mid-year update

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And, while compliance, costs, competition, and capital are still the headline drivers for most new initiatives, there is some acceptance that big data and analytics are key for a successful adoption of innovations such as artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML), platform-as-a-service (PaaS), fintech, regtech, and other areas. More importantly, there are already specific working use cases of AI and its ML cousin, delivering practical and tangible benefits across investment banks. The biggest headway for AI and ML has so far been around areas requiring automation, in the back office, post-trade areas, and in regulatory compliance. There is no doubt that regulatory initiatives continue to dominate activity, both from a business model and cost perspective.


Data-driven Astronomy Coursera

@machinelearnbot

In this course you will investigate the challenges of working with large datasets: how to implement algorithms that work; how to use databases to manage your data; and how to learn from your data with machine learning tools. Regardless of whether you're already a scientist, studying to become one, or just interested in how modern astronomy works'under the bonnet', this course will help you explore astronomy: from planets, to pulsars to black holes. Course outline: Week 1: Thinking about data - Principles of computational thinking - Discovering pulsars in radio images Week 2: Big data makes things slow - How to work out the time complexity of algorithms - Exploring the black holes at the centres of massive galaxies Week 3: Querying data using SQL - How to use databases to analyse your data - Investigating exoplanets in other solar systems Week 4: Managing your data - How to set up databases to manage your data - Exploring the lifecycle of stars in our Galaxy Week 5: Learning from data: regression - Using machine learning tools to investigate your data - Calculating the redshifts of distant galaxies Week 6: Learning from data: classification - Using machine learning tools to classify your data - Investigating different types of galaxies Each week will also have an interview with a data-driven astronomy expert. Note that some knowledge of Python is assumed, including variables, control structures, data structures, functions, and working with files.


Beyond HAL: How artificial intelligence is changing space systems - SpaceNews.com

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It currently takes the Mars Science Laboratory team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory eight hours to plan daily activities for the Curiosity rover before sending instructions through NASA's over-subscribed Deep Space Network. Last year, Curiosity began using software called Autonomous Exploration for Gathering Increased Science that combines computer vision with machine learning to select rocks and soil samples to investigate based on criteria determined by scientists. "Scientists on the mission have been excited about this because in the past they had to look at images, pick targets, send up commands and wait for data," said Kiri Wagstaff, a researcher in JPL's Machine Learning and Instrument Autonomy Group. NASA crews will spend far less time learning to operate the spacecraft than preparing to conduct microgravity research and maintain the orbiting outpost, said Chris Ferguson, the former space shuttle commander who directs crew and mission operations for Boeing's CST-100 Starliner program.


Tyrannosaur Skull's 3D Scan Shows How Top Dinosaur Predator Evolved

International Business Times

They took a high-energy CT scan of a 74-million-year-old skull that came from a dinosaur dubbed the Bisti Beast, which was found in northwestern New Mexico about 20 years ago and is related to the Tyrannosaurus rex, the Los Alamos National Laboratory reported, calling the work the highest resolution scan scientists have ever taken of a tyrannosaur. Researchers have scanned the skull of Bistahieversor sealeyi, a type of tyrannosaur found in New Mexico. According to Los Alamos National Lab, the scientists are expected to present more detailed results for the Bisti Beast at the annual Society of Vertebrate Paleontology meeting this month in Canada. Researchers have scanned the skull of Bistahieversor sealeyi, a type of tyrannosaur found in New Mexico.


How AI Will Impact Healthcare

@machinelearnbot

Perhaps that's why people who are researching artificial intelligence and healthcare are confident AI could contribute big improvements. AI is aiding in speedier diagnoses, leading to a greater amount of accuracy thanks to advantages like machine learning -- they can even give patients health information that's more personally relevant to them. However, recent studies suggest artificial intelligence could improve healthcare by making hospital stays less necessary, especially for people with chronic illnesses. In addition to cutting down on hospital admissions, machine learning algorithms could reduce false positives, thereby minimizing patient distress.


Our Earth Formation Theories Could Be All Wrong, New Experiment Suggests

International Business Times

The researchers put their results about the distribution of Zn and S into computer models based on current theories of Earth's formation, but none of them models came close to showing the same sulfur-to-zinc ratio of the present-day mantle. The main subclass of these non-metallic stony meteorites (called chondrites as a category) that is thought to have made up Earth is called enstatite chondrites. "However, this new work indicates that the Earth needs to have formed from a more S-poor source; in terms of the geochemistry, the best candidate for this material is the metal rich CH chondrites," Mahan said in the statement. Referring to the amount of sulfur in the Earth's crust, as capped at 2 percent by "most leading estimates," Mahan said using known meteorites as a source for Earth's formation doesn't concur with currently accepted values, thereby precluding "any of the solar system materials that have previously been proposed" as the source material for Earth.