JAXA


Space Station gets new floating robo-camera ball

Daily Mail

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has unveiled the first images captured by its spherical camera drone on the International Space Station. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has unveiled the first images captured by its spherical camera drone on the International Space Station. The camera ball uses 3D printed internal and external components, and uses drone technology such as Miniaturized Attitude Control Sensors and Actuators in an'All-in-one Module.' The camera ball uses 3D printed internal and external components, and uses drone technology such as Miniaturized Attitude Control Sensors and Actuators in an'All-in-one Module.'


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Mashable

If you've ever wondered about what it's like to be inside the International Space Station through the lens of, say, a drone, look no further. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has released images and video from its JEM Internal Ball Camera, known as "Int-Ball," -- a camera drone that can record images and video while moving in space -- and the new footage gives us earth-dwellers a sneak peek of the happenings on the space laboratory. According to the JAXA, the Int-Ball was initially delivered to "Kibo," the Japanese Experiment Module on the International Space Station, on June 4, 2017, aboard SpaceX's uncrewed Dragon capsule. With the device and it's recording capabilities, JAXA is giving people a fascinating look at the inner-workings of the International Space Station.


Meet the International Space Station's adorable camera drone

Engadget

Astronauts on board the International Space Station have a new robotic companion to play around with. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has released the first images shot by the "Int-Ball," a spherical camera that floats around alongside the rest of the crew. JAXA says crew members spend 10 percent of their working hours with a camera in hand, photographing work or equipment that requires further evaluation. A floating camera drone could, in theory, alleviate the crew of that responsibility, giving them more time to conduct experiments and carry out repairs.


Japan eyes sending humanoid robot into orbit

AITopics Original Links

NASA's tough-looking Robonaut 2 is slated to ride the Space Shuttle Discovery into orbit this month, and now Japan says it wants to shoot its own humanoid robot to the International Space Station too. Japan's space agency JAXA says it may put a humanoid on the ISS in 2013 so it can watch over crew members while they sleep and monitor their health and stress levels. NASA, on the other hand, wants humanoid robots to perform tasks on space walks in the future. The agency wants a robot that can supply "comfort and companionship."


Are pogo-dancing robots headed to moon?

AITopics Original Links

Bipedal robots taking pogo-like leaps may be the future of moon exploration, according to an idea the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency intends to test in practice. The phenomenon is perhaps best associated in the popular mind with footage taken in 1969 of astronaut Neil Armstrong taking gravity-defying leaps on the moon. But JAXA, which is among the Japanese agencies that wants to send humanoid robot explorers to the moon in lieu of humans, believes the "pogo jumping" style would be the best way for the machines to carry out future explorations. "They found that while the robot can leap to a height of 1.5 meters, such leaps put stresses on the robot's legs that make it more likely to fall over.


Fly across the lunar surface with stunning new HD videos from Japan's space programme

Daily Mail

While the footage was captured nearly a decade ago, JAXA has now made available more than 600 images taken by the craft's 2.2 megapixel HDTV sensors Kaguya's objectives were focused on obtaining scientific data of the lunar origin and evolution, according to JAXA. The mission was equipped with a main orbiting satellite at an altitude of roughly 100km, nicknamed Kaguya for a lunar princess in ancient Japanese folklore, along with two small satellites in polar orbit. The mission was equipped with a main orbiting satellite at an altitude of roughly 100km, nicknamed for a lunar princess in ancient Japanese folklore, along with two small satellites in polar orbit. The HDTV acquired a total of 6.3 TB of movies and still images of the Earth and the Moon over the mission period that started on September 29,2007, and ended on June 11, 2009 On June 10, 2009, it made impact with the south-east region, on the near side of the moon.


jaxa-eyes-2020-launch-new-x-ray-astronomy-satellite-replace-lost-hitomi

The Japan Times

Japan's space agency said Thursday that it is considering launching in 2020 an X-ray astronomy satellite to succeed Hitomi, which the agency lost communication with in March soon after it entered obit. Hitomi was launched Feb. 17 from the Tanegashima Space Center in Kagoshima Prefecture, but JAXA completely lost contact with the satellite on March 29 after experiencing trouble communicating with it. Currently, there is no similar planned observatory project until the European Space Agency launches its next-generation satellite sometime after 2028. JAXA also said it plans to launch an advanced unmanned cargo ship to the International Space Station in fiscal 2021.