JAXA


Space Station gets new floating robo-camera ball

Daily Mail

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has unveiled the first images captured by its spherical camera drone on the International Space Station. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has unveiled the first images captured by its spherical camera drone on the International Space Station. The camera ball uses 3D printed internal and external components, and uses drone technology such as Miniaturized Attitude Control Sensors and Actuators in an'All-in-one Module.' The camera ball uses 3D printed internal and external components, and uses drone technology such as Miniaturized Attitude Control Sensors and Actuators in an'All-in-one Module.'


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Mashable

If you've ever wondered about what it's like to be inside the International Space Station through the lens of, say, a drone, look no further. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has released images and video from its JEM Internal Ball Camera, known as "Int-Ball," -- a camera drone that can record images and video while moving in space -- and the new footage gives us earth-dwellers a sneak peek of the happenings on the space laboratory. According to the JAXA, the Int-Ball was initially delivered to "Kibo," the Japanese Experiment Module on the International Space Station, on June 4, 2017, aboard SpaceX's uncrewed Dragon capsule. With the device and it's recording capabilities, JAXA is giving people a fascinating look at the inner-workings of the International Space Station.


Meet the International Space Station's adorable camera drone

Engadget

Astronauts on board the International Space Station have a new robotic companion to play around with. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has released the first images shot by the "Int-Ball," a spherical camera that floats around alongside the rest of the crew. JAXA says crew members spend 10 percent of their working hours with a camera in hand, photographing work or equipment that requires further evaluation. A floating camera drone could, in theory, alleviate the crew of that responsibility, giving them more time to conduct experiments and carry out repairs.