INNOVATION


Collaboration in 2018: Trends We're Watching – Rowan Trollope – Medium

#artificialintelligence

I've been working with the collaboration technology team at Cisco since 2012, and the job just keeps getting more interesting. There are technology and market forces converging right now that are radically changing the way we all work. In the next year, we're going to see fundamental shifts in collaboration technologies. One of the most important changes in how we work is happening faster than I thought it would: People are getting comfortable talking to machines. We already talk to our phones, our cars, and our houses.


Alchemy, Rigour and Engineering

#artificialintelligence

Like many of you, I thoroughly enjoyed Ali Rahimi's NIPS talk in response to winning the test-of time award for their work on random kitchen sinks. I recommend everyone to watch it if you haven't already. He says what Ali calls alchemy is in fact engineering. Although I think Yann ends up arguing against points Ali didn't make in his talk, he raises important and good points about the different roles that tricks, empirical evidence and theory can play in engineering. I wanted to add my own thoughts and experiences to the mix.


Nasdaq vice chairman: AI business sector will come from future tech

#artificialintelligence

Without a doubt, artificial intelligence (AI) is changing how we do things. From today's iterations that power apps in your smartphone, to promises of super-intelligent AI in the next few decades, more companies are pushing for integrating AI technology into what they do. All of this means that there could soon be a new AI business sector thanks to an explosion of innovation, according to Bruce Aust, vice chairman of the U.S. stock exchange Nasdaq. Speaking to CNBC at the ongoing Web Summit conference in Lisbon, Portugal, Aust predicts that AI could lead to the creation of completely new industries or sectors. "I think AI is really going to be the technology behind a lot of these great companies that provide the innovations that will be a new sector we probably don't know about yet," the Nasdaq chief said.


AI and machine learning: Looking beyond the hype -- FCW

#artificialintelligence

In every federal agency, critical insights are hidden within the massive data sets collected over the years. But because of a shortage of data scientists in the federal government, extracting value from this data is time consuming, if it happens at all. Yet with advances in data science, artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, agencies now have access to advanced tools that will transform information analysis and agency operations. From predicting terror threats to detecting tax fraud, a new class of enterprise-grade tools, called automated machine learning, have the power to transform the speed and accuracy of federal decision-making through predictive modeling. Technologies like these that enable AI are changing the way the federal government understands and makes decisions.


NUS to open centre for artificial intelligence in Suzhou

#artificialintelligence

SINGAPORE - Start-ups working on artificial intelligence (AI) will now have a centre in Suzhou to help them venture into the Chinese market. Besides offering one-stop services for the start-ups, the centre aims to incubate 15 innovative companies in its first five years and promote National University of Singapore (NUS) technologies. The NUS Artificial Intelligence Innovation and Commercialisation Centre is a $20 million collaboration between NUS and Suzhou Industrial Park Administrative Committee. It will start operating from January 2018, focusing on advancing "AI research, innovation, application and commercialisation across various areas, including healthcare, financial technology and smart city", NUS said in a statement. "It will provide technology incubation support and solutions to start-ups and small businesses, helping them solve problems with AI as well as accelerate the adoption of AI to promote and form an AI ecosystem and industrial chain in the Suzhou area."


How AI Is Catching Crooks in Call Centers

#artificialintelligence

This article first appeared in Data Sheet, Fortune's daily newsletter on the top tech news. I was in Atlanta Thursday, and for the second time in two weeks I was reminded that Silicon Valley has no monopoly on innovation. I visited a company adjacent to Georgia Tech University called Pindrop, which makes voice authentication and security products used by financial services companies and the like to cut down on fraud. Its AI-driven software listens to customer responses and cuts down on annoying verification questions as well as fraudulent behavior. Pindrop has some mind-blowing capabilities.


Accenture Uses Artificial Intelligence to Help the Elderly Better Navigate Their Care and Improve Their Well-Being

#artificialintelligence

Accenture Uses Artificial Intelligence to Help the Elderly Better Navigate Their Care and Improve Their Well-Being LAS VEGAS and LONDON; Nov. 28, 2017 – Accenture (NYSE: ACN) has completed a pilot program that uses artificial intelligence (AI) and the ease of voice to help older people manage the daunting challenges of navigating their care delivery and well-being. The Accenture Liquid Studio in London developed an AI-powered platform (the Accenture Platform) that can learn user behaviors and preferences and suggest activities to support the overall physical and mental health of individuals ages 70 and older. The Accenture platform, which runs on the Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud, includes a'Family and Carer' portal that lets family and caregivers check on the individual's daily activities, such as whether they have taken their medication or made new requests for caregivers. The Accenture platform can also spot abnormalities in behavior and alert family or friends, based on user defined permissions. Elder Care Pilot: Accenture Uses AI to Help Navigate Elder Care Other services provided by the Accenture platform helped participants find local events as well as potential new friends, encouraging them to become more active and social.


The dawn of down-to-earth AI: Smart tech we'll see at CES 2018

#artificialintelligence

For the past few years, devices and services powered by artificial intelligence have been the most popular and interesting items at tech shows around the globe. This will surely be true in 2018, but there is already a noticeable shift in the market. First, mainstream consumer products are increasingly integrating AI, and not just high-end, premium products. Second, many of these products have intelligence built into the edge device, instead of relying on the cloud. These trends are improving accessibility, privacy, and effectivity of intelligent applications, making them more widely adopted.


HR tips for your robot employees

#artificialintelligence

I didn't believe it when I first saw it, but it soon made sense. Saudi Arabia has just granted citizenship to its first robot – the first time any country has recognised a robot in such a way. Her name is Sophia and this social robot is using her platform as the highest-profile robot in the world to advocate for women in her home nation. There's even talk of her having a family of her own one day. Why did this suddenly all make sense to me?


Artificial Intelligence effect: 5 years from now, 54 million Indians will hold jobs unheard of today

#artificialintelligence

Most predictions about the job landscape in the next few years involve automation, artificial intelligence (AI) and increasingly-redundant humans. Yes, layoffs are inevitable going forward, but what much of the chatter ignores is that the future will also see employment creation, including jobs that are as yet unheard of. Take the recent'Future of Jobs in India' study, commissioned jointly by FICCI and Nasscom with EY. The report looks at the impact of advanced technologies on 5 key manufacturing and services sectors in India-IT/ITeS, retail, financial services, textile & apparel and auto-that create the bulk of jobs. A key finding was that 9% of India's 600 million estimated workforce would be deployed in new jobs that do not exist today, while 37% would be in jobs that have radically changed skill sets.