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Investors are losing out on billions because tech stocks don't pay dividends

USATODAY

If Alphabet, Amazon and Facebook (along with Berkshire Hathaway) paid shareholder dividends at the 2.37% average yield of other S&P 500 companies that do so, it would shake out another $32.2 billion for investors, according to Howard Silverblatt, senior index analyst at S&P Dow Jones Indices. How to choose a smart speaker More: Here's one way Google envisions search changing for you But don't expect these tech companies to pay a dividend anytime soon. "During the 1990s, tech didn't typically pay dividends and they drove the stock market back then," said Kim Forrest, senior equity analyst at Fort Pitt Capital. The S&P tech sector had a dividend yield of 1.36% during the third quarter, the lowest of the 11 sectors and well below the overall S&P 500 of 1.97%, according to Silverblatt.


Tesla eyes hurricane-ravaged Caribbean, could shape power grids

USATODAY

Tesla Motors announced its bid to buy SolarCity, a solar power company where Tesla CEO Elon Musk is also the top shareholder. A preliminary investigation has begun for a fatal car crash involving a Tesla Model S.According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the electric model sedan had Autopilot mode engaged when a driver was killed. Tesla shares are lower in Wednesday's trading session after the company's shareholder meeting revealed that not every Tesla car owner will have free access to the company's Superchargers. Shares of Tesla are moving lower in after-hours trading on Wednesday after the electric car maker said it would sell more stock to raise money to ramp up production of the Model 3.


Apple just got deeper into AR with purchase of eye-tracking tech firm

USATODAY

SAN FRANCISCO -- Apple wants to make AR a reality. Three weeks after it unveiled ARKit, a new augmented reality developer kit that would help Apple app developers integrate this technology that overlays digital images on the physical world, and Apple CEO Tim Cook singed its praises, the company has acquired SensoMotoric Instruments, a German developer of eye-tracking movement technology. "Apple buys smaller technology companies from time to time, and we generally do not discuss our purpose or plans," the company said in an email statement. Longtime Apple analyst Tim Bajarin, president of Creative Strategies, believes the company could leverage AR for use in the home improvement and real estate industries.


BMW, Intel add Delphi to self-driving car alliance

USATODAY

German automaker BMW Group and U.S. tech giant Intel strengthened their self-driving car alliance with the addition of auto supplier Delphi, putting the companies a step closer to their goal of delivering an autonomous car by 2021. BMW and Intel said Tuesday that they had struck a deal to collaborate with Delphi on development and integration of self-driving car technology, with a particular emphasis "in the areas of perception, sensor fusion and high performance automated driving computing." The alliance comes after Delphi recently announced plans to split into two companies, with one focused on electrical systems for self-driving cars and the second focused on powertrains. But after Intel recently announced plans to acquire self-driving car tech powerhouse Mobileyefor $15 billion, the BMW-Intel-Delphi alliance can make a case for industry leadership.


Intel to acquire self-driving firm Mobileye for $15 billion

USATODAY

Intel announced Monday it will acquire Mobileye in a deal worth about $15 billion, as the tech giant makes a deeper push into the growing self-driving vehicle market. In a statement, Intel says it plans to acquire Mobileye for $63.54 per share in cash. Intel says the deal will help accelerate innovation in the self-driving vehicle market, forecast to reach $70 billion by 2030. However, Intel is part of a crowded field of tech companies and automakers seeking to get their autonomous vehicles and self-driving systems on the road.


Smart cars behind Samsung's $8B bid for Harman

USATODAY

Electronics giant Samsung on Monday said it will buy U.S. car and audio systems supplier Harman International for $8 billion. South Korean electronics giant Samsung looks to very quickly get up to speed in the highly-competitive smart car business with its $8 billion acquisition of U.S. car and audio systems supplier Harman International The all-cash deal will see Samsung buy the Stamford, Conn.-headquartered firm for $112.00 per share. But the electronics titan -- hit in recent weeks by the recalls of its Galaxy Note 7 smartphone and some washing machines with tops that could detach -- is playing catchup in smart cars to competitors such as Apple, which has a CarPlay feature available in a growing number of vehicles, and Google and its Android Auto in-car platform. Samsung washing machines recalled for risk of'impact injuries' Shares of Harman (HAR) surged 25% Monday to $109.96.


Review: GoPro Karma drone soars with great video

USATODAY

Jefferson Graham reviews GoPro's new Karma drone, an affordable flying camera with stellar video quality. For $800, you get the GoPro drone, stick mount, propellers, a cool controller with video playback that can be seen in bright light and a large backpack to carry everything around. I turned on the drone and controller, saw the propellers start to turn, pressed the launch button and up she went. That said, the video quality on the GoPro Hero 5 trumps both the Osmo Mobile, which uses smartphone cameras, and the plain $549 Osmo, which has its own camera.


Microsoft, not Apple, hosted must-see tech event

USATODAY

A guest looks at the Touch Bar on a MacBook computer shown in a demo room following the announcement of new products at Apple headquarters. MacBook computers are shown in a demo room following the announcement of new products at Apple headquarters. Guests sit under a quote by Steve Jobs displayed on the Apple campus before an announcement of new products at Apple headquarters in Cupertino, Calif. Apple Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing Phil Schiller introduces the all-new MacBook Pro during a product launch event on Oct. 27, 2016, in Cupertino, Calif. Steve Jobs photo is reflected off a piano in the hallway at the Apple headquarters in Cupertino, Calif. Apple Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing Phil Schiller introduces the all-new MacBook Pro during a product launch event Oct. 27, 2016, in Cupertino, Calif. Apple Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing Phil Schiller introduces the all-new MacBook Pro during a product launch event on Oct. 27 in Cupertino, Calif. To briefly recap, Microsoft swooped into cosmopolitan New York City to unveil a suite of new hardware and software aimed at taking digital productivity to the next level. In contrast, Apple's event took place on its relatively modest Cupertino campus in a small auditorium whose lobby features two massive photos of Steve Jobs and one massive quote about the need to do something great at every turn.


Apple to help viewers discover TV shows through an app

USATODAY

Apple plans to announce this week a new way for viewers to discover TV shows through an app, people with knowledge of the project told USA TODAY. Described to network executives as "the Watch List," the app will recommend shows based on the content viewers access through their Apple TVs. This new approach of distilling recommendations into a single app builds on the improvements in search and discovery that Apple introduced last year, with the fourth update to its Apple TV streaming box. An updated remote control lets viewers fetch TV shows on command, using Apple's digital assistant, Siri, to call up the latest installment of the NBC's The Voice.


Cook talks the future of Apple, demands of his job in lengthy interview

USATODAY

Apple CEO Tim Cook waves to the crowd as takes the stage at Apple's annual Worldwide Developers Conference at the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium in San Francisco, California, onJune 13, 2016. Cook, a private individual who heads one of the most secretive company in Silicon Valley, spoke openly about topics that including his coming out as a gay man and replacing the "not replaceable" Steve Jobs. The company also acquired smaller companies specializing in artificial intelligence, augmented reality and speech recognition in the past few years, most recently acquiring Seattle-based AI startup Turi. At the company's most recent developers conference this spring, Apple announced it would open Siri to outside developers and ramp up face and speech recognition in its next iOS release.