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You have no idea what artificial intelligence really does

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WHEN SOPHIA THE ROBOT first switched on, the world couldn't get enough. It had a cheery personality, it joked with late-night hosts, it had facial expressions that echoed our own. Here it was, finally -- a robot plucked straight out of science fiction, the closest thing to true artificial intelligence that we had ever seen. There's no doubt that Sophia is an impressive piece of engineering. It didn't take much to convince people of Sophia's apparent humanity -- many of Futurism's own articles refer to the robot as "her."


You have no idea what artificial intelligence really does

#artificialintelligence

But as Sophia became more popular and people took a closer look, cracks emerged. It became harder to believe that Sophia was the all-encompassing artificial intelligence that we all wanted it to be. Over time, articles that might have once oohed and ahhed about Sophia's conversational skills became more focused on the fact that they were partially scripted in advance. Ben Goertzel, CEO of SingularityNET and Chief Scientist of Hanson Robotics, isn't under any illusions about what Sophia is capable of. "Sophia and the other Hanson robots are not really'pure' as computer science research systems, because they combine so many different pieces and aspects in complex ways. They are not pure learning systems, but they do involve learning on various levels (learning in their neural net visual systems, learning in their OpenCog dialogue systems, etc.)," he told Futurism.


MIT unveils new $1 bn college for artificial intelligence

Daily Mail

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has announced plans to create a new college for the development of artificial intelligence. The university said it would add 50 new faculty members and create an interdisciplinary hub for work in computer science, AI, data science, and related fields. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has announced plans to create a new college for the development of artificial intelligence. A large part of the new funds will come from a gift from Stephen Schwarzman, chairman and co-founder of financial giant Blackstone, after whom the new college will be named. 'As computing reshapes our world, MIT intends to help make sure it does so for the good of all,' said MIT President Rafael Reif.


The Pentagon's $2 billion gamble on artificial intelligence

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It's the chilling plot line to every science fiction movie about robots in the future: Once they start thinking for themselves, humanity is doomed. Think of the HAL 9000 in "2001: A Space Odyssey," or the replicants in "Blade Runner," or the hosts in "Westworld." These days the Pentagon is doing a lot of thinking about the nascent scientific field of artificial intelligence, also known as "machine learning," developing computer algorithms that will allow cars to drive themselves, robots to perform surgery, and even weapons to kill autonomously. The race to master artificial intelligence is the No. 1 priority of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the tiny organization with just over 200 workers that was instrumental in developing stealth technology, high precision weapons, and the Internet. "In reality, over about the last 50 years, DARPA and its research partners have led the way to establishing the field of artificial intelligence. We are not new to this game," said DARPA Director Steven Walker at the agency's 60th anniversary symposium in September.


We'd Like To See Deep Learning Hand To Hand With Deep Feeling

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Hardly could anyone find a point at the Heidelberg Laurate Forum space-time without hearing about Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Deep Learning. The truth is that the majority of mathematician lecturers were fascinated by the allure of algorithms. The most conservative ones have already transformed computing machines into self-developing systems functioning in a limited field of knowledge while some brave ones design broader AI applications. One of the few exceptions to the rule was Sir Michael Francis Atiyah. Defying the skepticism of his peers he claimed to have solved the Riemann Hypothesis which has remained unsolved for more than 160 years, making it a million dollar problem.


Artificial Intelligence in the business sphere

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Humankind has been long fascinated with the concept of machine learning or artificial intelligence. Vast literature and artwork have been created to express the idea that one day, machines will develop their own sense of learning and process information by themselves, without the need for constant human programming. Movies like "Tobor the Great" (1954), "The Terminator" (1984), "A.I." (2001), "iRobot" (2004), and "Transcendence" (2014) featured these futuristic technologies where computers/robots even get to acquire the cognitive ability of man, nay, even at some point surpass it beyond belief. Believe it or not, these technologies exist now. Since its public breakthrough in 2012, artificial intelligence (AI) has since began to spread in the commercial sphere to further streamline business processes, boost product functionality, and aid in customer services.


Artificial intelligence is automating Hollywood. Now, art can thrive.

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The next time you sit down to watch a movie, the algorithm behind your streaming service might recommend a blockbuster that was written by AI, performed by robots, and animated and rendered by a deep learning algorithm. An AI algorithm may have even read the script and suggested the studio buy the rights. It's easy to think that technology like algorithms and robots will make the film industry go the way of the factory worker and the customer service rep, and argue that artistic filmmaking is in its death throes. For the film industry, the same narrative doesn't apply -- artificial intelligence seems to have enhanced Hollywood's creativity, not squelched it. It's true that some jobs and tasks are being rendered obsolete now that computers can do them better.


Can artificial intelligence change construction?

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IBM's Watson supercomputer has beat Jeopardy champions, reconstituted recipes, and even helped create highlight reels for the World Cup. Now it's taking on a new tech challenge; changing how the construction industry operates. A new partnership between IBM and Fluor, a global engineering and construction company, will put the supercomputer's computational skills to work on making building more efficient. The new Watson-based system, in development since 2015 and now in use on select projects, will be able to analyze a job site "like a doctor diagnoses a patient," according to Leslie Lindgren, Fluor's vice president of Information Management. That degree of risk analysis, predictive logistics, and comprehension is no small challenge given the complexity of today's construction megaprojects.


Researchers train AI to mimic 20 acrobatic moves from YouTube videos

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Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have created a framework for teaching artificial intelligence systems to learn motion from being shown video clips on YouTube. The framework incorporates computer vision and reinforcement learning to train AI skills from videos. Altogether the team was able to train AI to perform more than 20 acrobatic tasks like cartwheels, handsprings, backflips, and some martial arts. The method does not require the use of motion capture video, the kind often used to transfer human action to digital forms, such as the movement of LeBron James incorporated into NBA 2K18 or the performance of Andy Serkis as Gollum from Lord of the Rings. The framework works by first ingesting the video to understand the poses seen in each video frame; then a simulated character is trained to imitate the movement using reinforcement learning.


AI And Big Data: Two Major Parts of The Digital Future

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If you follow technology news in any way, you've undoubtedly noticed that AI and Big Data are trending topics. Both technologies are certainly the driving force behind a variety of tech innovations. In the following paragraphs, we'll explore exactly what AI and big data are, how they work together, and the ways in which both will disrupt the digital future. Artificial intelligence is the technology that allows computers to do things that were once only the domain of humans. For example, computers have always been able to calculate.