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Apple is next up to strut its artificial intelligence ambitions

USATODAY

Apple is reportedly working on a processor that is devoted to AI-related tasks to improve how its devices handle tasks that require human intelligence. A man takes a selfie while waiting for the start of an Apple event at the Worldwide Developer's Conference on June 13, 2016 in San Francisco, California. Looking at what's been discussed to this point (and speculating on what Apple will announce at its Worldwide Developer Conference Monday), it's safe to say that all of these organizations are keenly focused on different types of artificial intelligence, or AI. What this means is that each wants to create unique experiences that leverage both new types of computing components and software algorithms to automatically generate useful information about the world around us. In other words, they want to use real-world data in clever ways to enable cool stuff.


Elon Musk's Neuralink wants to plug into your brain

USATODAY

Elon Musk wants to link human brains with computers. The CEO of SpaceX and Tesla Motors is exploring just such a connection through another company he has launched, called Neuralink. If there's anything else entrepreneur has on his To Do list, he'll have to also invent life-extension technology just so he can stick around long enough to get everything done. And now there's another venture: creating micro-implants that, once inserted in the brain, can not just fix conditions such as epilepsy but potentially turn your brain into a computer-assisted powerhouse. Time to screen The Matrix, people.


Tesla's Musk may now want to plug into your brain

USATODAY

Elon Musk has stated that he is "fairly confident" that Model 3 deliveries will start by the end of 2017. Tesla stock was on the rise during late morning trading Friday. If there's anything else entrepreneur has on his To Do list, he'll have to also invent life-extension technology just so he can stick around long enough to get everything done. And now there's another venture: creating micro-implants that once inserted in the brain can not just fix conditions such as epilepsy but potentially turn your brain into a computer-assisted powerhouse. Time to screen The Matrix, people.


Voice-controlled devices shift tech industry

USATODAY

After decades of screen domination, technology companies, products and, indeed, the entire tech industry, are finally starting to pivot. The target of this refocused interest? After a slow and pretty rough start with Apple's Siri several years back, the idea of voice-controlled technology devices is beginning to take hold, thanks in large part to the success of Amazon's Echo and its Alexa personal assistant. The proliferation of Alexa-enabled devices at the recent Consumer Electronics Show put an exclamation point on that development. But as cool and interesting as accurate voice recognition and simple control may be, the real impact of voice-driven computing is significantly more profound.


Intel's battle for relevance

USATODAY

Intel has released its mid-year diversity numbers, which show only slight changes from late 2015 despite the tech company's 300 million to drastically change the makeup of its workforce. The company that arguably started and dominated the intelligent devices market for decades now finds itself in the role of an underdog, just as we're entering an era when the number of smart, computing-capable, connected things is exploding all around us. But that's exactly the position that Silicon Valley stalwart Intel finds itself in on the eve of its big annual Intel Developer Forum (IDF), being held in San Francisco this week. Intel's long-term strength, of course, has been providing the vast majority of the computing brains (the CPU) for the PC market. After several years of declining PC shipments, however, that legacy advantage has turned into a disadvantage, even despite signs that commercial PC shipments could be on the rebound.


An AI future where voice and video trump words

USATODAY

Ari Roisman, CEO and cofounder of Glide, a video-messaging app that hopes to capitalize on the coming transition away from texting and towards a voice-and-video interaction future. SAN FRANCISCO - Typing is so ... 20th century. And soon texting is likely to join it in that same communication dustbin. That's a view Ari Roisman, CEO and cofounder of video messaging app Glide, shares with some of the titans of tech ranging from Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella to Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. "We're at the beginning of a new era of human computer interaction," says Roisman during a podcast Friday with USA TODAY.


Meet Home, Google's answer to Amazon Echo

USATODAY

Jefferson Graham reports from Google's I/O developer conference, where the Internet giant introduced new home products and apps aimed at having Google make your life easier. The standalone device will compete directly with Amazon's popular Echo and should be available to consumers later this year, Google CEO Sundar Pichai announced at the search company's annual developers conference, Google I/O. The move had been anticipated, as Google looks to put its mark on a coming age of artificial intelligence in which machines learn to interpret and answer human queries by leveraging the speed and scope of cloud computing. Though smartphones still hold a lock human-computing interactions, the surprise hit of Amazon's Echo speaker has energized a new category: speakers run by digital assistants connected to a tech giant's app and content ecosystem. Google Home project lead Mario Querioz held the device in his palm, revealing a design that was shorter and wider than Amazon's cylindrical Echo, which is powered by Amazon's virtual assistant Alexa.


The future of computing will be ambient and invisible

USATODAY

People wave while waiting to take their seats to hear the keynote address of the Google I/O conference in Mountain View, Calif. FOSTER CITY, Calif.--Computers as we know them are about to disappear. Well, okay, they won't completely disappear, but they will take on a new form that makes them very difficult to distinguish from everyday objects all around us. This transformation is part of a bigger, longer term trend that some have dubbed "ambient" computing. The idea is that computing capability will end up being embedded in devices ranging from speakers to automobiles, and will provide capabilities and services to us throughout the day via the environment around us. "The difference between receiving useful information or performing specific actions automatically, as opposed to instigating the efforts on our own, is profound" The most obvious example of ambient computing to date is Amazon's Echo line of products.