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AI's impact on network engineering now and in the future

#artificialintelligence

If nothing else, AI continues to climb the technology hype curve. It was impossible to read the news, browse the web, attend a conference, or even watch television without seeing a reference to how AI is making our lives better. Since Alan Turing declared "what we want is a machine that can learn from experience" in a 1947 lecture to the London Mathematical Society, the imaginations of computer scientists and engineers have run wild with visions of a computer that can answer questions on par with a human. Today, almost everyone in business is looking at how to leverage AI, and there is no shortage of vendors looking to capitalize on the trend. Venture Scanner currently tracks more than 2,000 AI startups that have received more than $26 billion in funding.


The future is quantum: Microsoft releases free preview of Quantum Development Kit - The AI Blog

#artificialintelligence

So you want to learn how to program a quantum computer. Now, there's a toolkit for that. Microsoft is releasing a free preview version of its Quantum Development Kit, which includes the Q# programming language, a quantum computing simulator and other resources for people who want to start writing applications for a quantum computer. The Q# programming language was built from the ground up specifically for quantum computing. The Quantum Development Kit, which Microsoft first announced at its Ignite conference in September, is designed for developers who are eager to learn how to program on quantum computers whether or not they are experts in the field of quantum physics.


9 Technology Mega Trends That Will Change The World In 2018

@machinelearnbot

Some tech trends fizzle out and die a quiet death, while others are so significant that they transform our world and how we live in it. Here are the top nine tech mega-trends that I believe will define 2018 and beyond. From chatting to friends in a messaging app or buying a coffee, to tapping in and out with an Oyster card or streaming music, today almost everything we do leaves a trail of data breadcrumbs. And this increasing datafication of our world has led to an unprecedented explosion in data. Just in the average minute, Facebook receives 900,000 logins, more than 450,000 Tweets are posted, and 156 million emails and 15 million texts are sent.With numbers like that, it's no wonder we're essentially doubling the amount of data created in the world roughly every two years.


9 Technology Mega Trends That Will Change The World In 2018

#artificialintelligence

Some tech trends fizzle out and die a quiet death, while others are so significant that they transform our world and how we live in it. Here are the top nine tech mega-trends that I believe will define 2018 and beyond. From chatting to friends in a messaging app or buying a coffee, to tapping in and out with an Oyster card or streaming music, today almost everything we do leaves a trail of data breadcrumbs. And this increasing datafication of our world has led to an unprecedented explosion in data. Just in the average minute, Facebook receives 900,000 logins, more than 450,000 Tweets are posted, and 156 million emails and 15 million texts are sent.With numbers like that, it's no wonder we're essentially doubling the amount of data created in the world roughly every two years.


Microsoft and USyd claim invention of key quantum computing component

ZDNet

A team at the University of Sydney (USyd) working with Microsoft, alongside Stanford University in the US, has announced the development of a miniaturised component touted as essential for the scale-up of quantum computing. According to the university, the work represents the first practical application of a new phase of matter that was first discovered in 2006, "topological insulators", which are materials that operate as insulators in the bulk of their structures, but have surfaces that act as conductors. "Manipulation of these materials provide a pathway to construct the circuitry needed for the interaction between quantum and classical systems," explained USyd in a statement. As a result, USyd said they are vital for building a practical quantum computer. The Sydney team developed a microwave circulator, which acts like a traffic roundabout by ensuring that electrical signals only propagate in one direction, clockwise or anti-clockwise, as required.


?platform=hootsuite

#artificialintelligence

With the boom in digital technologies, the world is producing over 2.5 exabytes of data every day. To put that into perspective, it is equivalent to the memory of 5 million laptops or 150 million phones. The deluge of data is forecast to increase with the passing day and with it has increased the need for powerful hardware that can support it. This hardware advancement refers to faster computing or processing speed and larger storage systems. Companies worldwide are investing in powerful computing with the R&Ds constantly in the race for making improved processors.


Alibaba wants to "master the laws" of AI and put virtual assistants everywhere

#artificialintelligence

China's e-commerce giant Alibaba has announced plans to invest more than $15 billion over the next three years in researching emerging technologies including artificial intelligence and quantum computing. Jack Ma, Alibaba's executive chairman, announced his decision to establish the Alibaba DAMO Academy (DAMO stands for Discovery, Adventure, Momentum, and Outlook) on the first day of the company's 2017 Computing Conference, which opened on Wednesday. Ma said the academy will do research aimed at "solving problems" related to the Internet of things, fintech, quantum computing, and AI. It will open seven research labs in China, the U.S., Russia, Israel, and Singapore. Chinese tech companies are increasingly looking to invest in cutting-edge research, especially artificial intelligence (see "China's AI Awakening").


From AI to mixed reality: Inside Microsoft's Future Decoded event

#artificialintelligence

Future Decoded is a conference for customers and partners of the tech giant which was held in London over two days at the start of this month. Discussions about the potential of artificial intelligence (AI) were much in evidence. Microsoft's approach to AI is as a service delivered from its Azure cloud delivered through a network of large scale data centres and smaller edge based technologies. Also on the agenda was Microsoft's Quantum Computing software programme development which uses what is known as Topological Qubits code, described as "a robust type of quantum bit that Microsoft believes will serve as the basis for a scalable, general purpose quantum computer system." Microsoft plans to release Quantum Computing developer code before then end of the year.


DeepMind wants to find the next miracle material--experts just don't know how they'll pull it off

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence has historically over-promised and under-delivered. That routine leads to spurts of what those in the field call "hype"--outsized excitement about the potential of a core technology--followed after a few years and several million (or billion) dollars by crashing disappointment. In the end, we still don't have the flying cars or realistic robot dogs we were promised. But DeepMind's AlphaGo, a star pupil in a time we'll likely look back on as a golden age of AI research, has made a habit of blowing away experts' notions of what's possible. When DeepMind announced that the AI system could play Go on a professional level, masters of the game said it was too complex for any machine.


Heidelberg Laureate Forum

Communications of the ACM

It is fall in Heidelberg and the leaves on the trees are already turning. This is the fifth year of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (http://www.heidelberg-laureate-forum.org/) and it continues to be a highlight of the year for me and for about 250 others who participate. This year, computer science was heavily represented. There were fewer mathematicians, but they made up for smaller numbers by their extraordinary qualifications. A new cohort of laureates was added this year: recipients of the ACM Prize for Computing.a