Results


The Sixth International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems (ICEIS 2004)

AI Magazine

The Sixth International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems (ICEIS) was held in Porto, Portugal; previous venues were in Spain, France, and the United Kingdom. Since its inception in 1999, ICEIS has grown steadily, and is now one of the largest international conferences in the area of information systems. In 2004, more than 600 papers were submitted to the conference and its ten satellite workshops. One of the interesting features of this conference is the high number of invited speakers. In 2004, eighteen keynote speakers were featured at ICEIS and its workshops.


1965

AI Magazine

Over the past decade, the commercial games industry has come to realize the importance of AI to its next-generation products. Similarly, the academic community now recognizes the interesting research challenges of game AI. AAAI responded to this interest with the creation in 2005 of the Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment conference series. The third AIIDE conference was held in June 2007 and was a great success. It featured 10 (!) invited speakers and attracted an excellent mix of academic researchers and industry practitioners.


The Big Promise of Recommender Systems

AI Magazine

Dozens of vendors have built recommendation technologies and taken them to market in two waves, roughly aligning with the web 1.0 and 2.0 revolutions. Today recommender systems are found in a multitude of online services.


What If AI Succeeds?

AI Magazine

Within the time of a human generation, computer technology will be capable of producing computers with as many artificial neurons as there are neurons in the human brain. Within two human generations, intelligists (AI researchers) will have discovered how to use such massive computing capacity in brainlike ways. This situation raises the likelihood that twenty-first century global politics will be dominated by the question, Who or what is to be the dominant species on this planet? This article discusses rival political and technological scenarios about the rise of the artilect (artificial intellect, ultraintelligent machine) and launches a plea that a world conference be held on the socalled "artilect debate." Many years ago, while reading my first book on molecular biology, I realized not only that living creatures, including human beings, are biochemical machines, but also that one day, humanity would sufficiently understand the principles of life to be able to reproduce life artificially (Langton 1989) and even create a creature more intelligent than we are.


Column

AI Magazine

Editorial: Time to Think about Artificial Intelligence. "AI pervades our world and may soon start evolving faster than humans can track it--in whose hands should this awesome power reside? When it comes to emerging technologies, we know what we're afraid of, even though we may not know why. There is no shortage of public debate about genetically modified crops, nanotechnology and cloning. And policy makers have responded: many countries have laws that restrict the way these technologies can be used.


AI and HCI: Two Fields Divided by a Common Focus

AI Magazine

Although AI and HCI explore computing and intelligent behavior and the fields have seen some crossover, until recently there was not very much. This article outlines a history of the fields that identifies some of the forces that kept the fields at arm's length. AI was generally marked by a very ambitious, long-term vision requiring expensive systems, although the term was rarely envisioned as being as long as it proved to be, whereas HCI focused more on innovation and improvement of widely used hardware within a short time scale. These differences led to different priorities, methods, and assessment approaches. A consequence was competition for resources, with HCI flourishing in AI winters and moving more slowly when AI was in favor.


AAAI News

AI Magazine

The winning papers were selected by the program cochairs with the help of some members of the Senior Program Committee. Alan Mackworth, AAAI President, and Ron Brachman, AAAI Past President and Awards Committee Chair, presented the AAAI awards in July at AAAI-07 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Award winners received a certificate and a check for $1,000. The 2007 AAAI Classic Paper Award was given to the authors of the most influential paper from the Seventh National Conference on Artificial Intelligence, held in 1988 in St. Paul, Minnesota. The award was presented to Peter Cheeseman, Matthew Self, Jim Kelly, Will Taylor, and Don Freeman for "Bayesian Classification."


AAAI News

AI Magazine

The Twenty-Second National Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-07) and the Nineteenth Conference on Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence (IAAI-07) will be held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada at the Hyatt Regency Vancouver, July 22-26, 2007. Please plan to join us for our second conference in Canada! The Twenty-First National Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-06) and the Eighteenth Conference on Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence (IAAI-06) will be held in Boston, Massachusetts at the Seaport Hotel and World Trade Center, July 16-20, 2006. The AAAI-06 keynote address will be given by Tim Berners-Lee, Director of the World Wide Web Consortium, on Tuesday, July 18. Other invited speakers include Pedro Domingos (University of Washington), Ken Koedinger (Carnegie Mellon University), Karen Myers (SRI International), and Dan Roth (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign).


AAAI News

AI Magazine

Tom Mitchell, AAAI past president and Awards Committee chair, and Ron Brachman, AAAI president, presented the AAAI awards in July at AAAI-05 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Award winners received a certificate and a check for $1,000. He formerly held the position of associate professor of computer science and engineering at the University of Washington Seattle, and between academic jobs held a variety of industry positions at Harlequin Software, Amazon.com, and other companies. He earned a Ph.D. degree from Yale University, and an M.B.A. degree from the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. Drew McDermott has done work in several areas of artificial intelligence. One of his perennial interests is in planning algorithms, which calculate structures of actions for autonomous agents of various sorts. He did seminal work in the area of hierarchical planning in the 1970s. In the last decade, his focus has switched to regressionbased techniques for classical planning, especially methods ...


Editorial Introduction to the Special Articles in the Summer Issue

AI Magazine

This editorial to the summer 2015 AI Magazine introduces the specialissue articles on architectures for activity recognition and context-aware computing. Soon people will be carrying devices and working in environments that understand not only our personal declarative and demographic facts (information stored in datebooks, calendars, and social media) but also have a deep understanding of the context and intent of our day-to-day activities. The last 10 years have seen the development of novel architectures and technologies for domainfocused, task-specific systems that know many things, such as who (identities, profile, history) they are with (social context) and in what role (responsibility, security, privacy); when and where (event, time, place); why (goals, shared or personal); how are they doing it (methods, applications); and using what resources (device, services, access, and ownership). Smart spaces and devices will increasingly use such contextual knowledge to help users move seamlessly between devices and applications, without having to explicitly carry, transfer, and exchange activity context. Such systems will qualitatively shift our lives both at work and play and significantly change our interactions both with our physical and virtual worlds.