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The many interfaces of computing

MIT News

The new MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing will incorporate the modern tools of computing into disciplines across the Institute. "The college will equip students to be as fluent in computing and AI [artificial intelligence] as they are in their own disciplines -- and ready to use these digital tools wisely and humanely to help make a better world," says MIT President Rafael Reif. As often happens, it appears MIT students are already there. We recently spoke with six undergraduate students who are participating in the Advanced Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (SuperUROP), and found them already thinking deeply about how new computational technologies can be put to use in fields outside of computer science. These students are working on a huge range of problems that share a common theme: Solving them will provide tangible benefits to society.


Bridge to the future of engineering

MIT News

School of Engineering faculty are embracing the new MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing as a bold response to the rapid evolution of computing that is altering and, in many cases, fundamentally transforming their disciplines. Inspired by student interest in computing, MIT President L. Rafael Reif launched an assessment process more than a year ago that involved widespread engagement with key stakeholders across the MIT community. Discussions were led by President Reif, Provost Martin A. Schmidt, and Dean of the School of Engineering Anantha P. Chandrakasan with Faculty Chair Susan Silbey playing a key role. "The creation of the college is MIT's first major academic structural change since 1950," says Chandrakasan, the Vannevar Bush Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. "After consulting with faculty from across engineering and throughout MIT, the need to do something timely and deeply impactful was abundantly clear. Mr. Schwarzman's inspired and amazingly generous support was instrumental to our ability to move forward."


What are the Optimal Data Science and Machine Learning Competencies for Informatics Professionals?

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Exactly 20 years ago, I organized a panel at the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) Annual Symposium that attracted so large an audience that the crowd spilled out of the room into the hallway. Entitled, What are the Optimal Computer Science Competencies for Medical Informatics Professionals?, the panel asked how much knowledge and skills in computer science were required to work professionally in informatics. In the early days of informatics, most informaticians had some programming skills and often contributed to the development of home-grown systems. Some educational programs, such as the one at Stanford University, had required courses in assembly language. But as academic informatics systems grew in scope and complexity, they needed more engineering and hardening as they became mission-critical to organizations.


The Future of Artificial Intelligence in China

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China's research efforts in artificial intelligence (AI) began later than the U.S. and Europe. Early contributions in the 1970s included automated theorem proving, logic reasoning, search, and knowledge engineering. For example, Wen-tsün Wu is a pioneer in automated theorem proving. He received the State Preeminent Science and Technology Award in 2000, an honor bestowed on only 25 Chinese scientists across all fields to date. Bo Zhang and Ruqian Lu received the Life Achievement Award from the China Computer Federation (CCF) for their fundamental contributions respectively on problem solving and knowledge engineering.


MIT to Found AI College - AI Trends

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The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has announced a $1 billion initiative to reshape how the college operates and make artificial intelligence a part of its curriculum for all students. The shakeup is being made, MIT president L. Rafael Reif said, to "prepare students of today for the world of the future" and represents the biggest change to curriculum at the school since the 1950s. The effort will be spearheaded by a $350 million donation from from Blackstone investment firm CEO Stephen Schwarzman. An additional $300 million has been raised for the $1 billion project. The Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing will work on incorporating computing and AI into all fields of study at MIT, encouraging cross-disciplinary endeavors, and exploring ways to create a shared structure between the university's five existing schools.


MIT commits $1 billion to make AI part of every graduate's education

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The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) today announced a $1 billion initiative to reshape how the college operates and make artificial intelligence a part of its curriculum for all students. The shakeup is being made, MIT president L. Rafael Reif said, to "prepare students of today for the world of the future" and represents the biggest change to curriculum at the school since the 1950s. The effort will be spearheaded by a $350 million donation from from Blackstone investment firm CEO Stephen Schwarzman. An additional $300 million has been raised for the $1 billion project. The Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing will work on incorporating computing and AI into all fields of study at MIT, encouraging cross-disciplinary endeavors, and exploring ways to create a shared structure between the university's five existing schools.


MIT announces $1 billion outlay for study of artificial intelligence, computing - The Boston Globe

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The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is pumping $1 billion into a new center for the study of the "global opportunities and challenges presented by the prevalence of computing and the rise of artificial intelligence," the school said Monday. In a statement, MIT said the MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing will open in September 2019 as "an interdisciplinary hub for work in computer science, AI, data science, and related fields." A $350 million foundational gift from Schwarzman, head of the massive investment firm Blackstone, will get the project rolling. In addition to Schwarzman's gift, MIT has raised another $300 million for the college that bears his name, with further fundraising being "actively pursued" to raise the $1 billion needed for the learning hub, the statement said. "The College's attention to ethics matters enormously to me, because we will never realize the full potential of these advancements unless they are guided by a shared understanding of their moral implications for society," Schwarzman said in the release.


MIT reshapes itself to shape the future

MIT News

MIT today announced a new $1 billion commitment to address the global opportunities and challenges presented by the prevalence of computing and the rise of artificial intelligence (AI). The initiative marks the single largest investment in computing and AI by an American academic institution, and will help position the United States to lead the world in preparing for the rapid evolution of computing and AI. At the heart of this endeavor will be the new MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing, made possible by a $350 million foundational gift from Mr. Schwarzman, the chairman, CEO and co-founder of Blackstone, a leading global asset manager. Headquartered in a signature new building on MIT's campus, the new MIT Schwarzman College of Computing will be an interdisciplinary hub for work in computer science, AI, data science, and related fields. With the MIT Schwarzman College of Computing's founding, MIT seeks to strengthen its position as a key international player in the responsible and ethical evolution of technologies that are poised to fundamentally transform society.


FAQ on the newly established MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing

MIT News

This set of FAQs offers information about the founding of the MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing, announced today, and its implications for the MIT community and beyond. Q: What is MIT announcing today that's new? A: Today MIT is announcing a $1 billion commitment to address the global opportunities and challenges presented by the ubiquity of computing -- across industries and academic disciplines -- and by the rise of artificial intelligence. At the heart of this endeavor will be the new MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing, made possible by a foundational $350 million gift from Stephen Schwarzman, the chairman, CEO, and co-founder of Blackstone, a leading global asset manager. An additional $300 million has been secured for the College through other fundraising.


Meet These Incredible Women Advancing A.I. Research

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A world renowned pioneer in social robotics, Cynthia Breazeal splits her time as an Associate Professor at MIT, where she received her PhD and founded the Personal Robots Group, and Founder and Chief Scientist of Jibo, a personal robotics company with over $85 million in funding. While Breazeal's work has won numerous academic awards, industry accolades, and media attention, she had to fight early skepticism in the 1990s from other experts in robotics and AI. At the time, robots were seen as physical and industrial tools, not social or emotional companions. Her first social robot, Kismet, was unfairly called out in popular press as "useless". Breazeal bucked the trend with a very different vision: "I wanted to create robots with social and emotional intelligence that could work in collaborative partnership with people. In 2-5 years, I see social robots helping families with things that really matter, like education, health, eldercare, entertainment, and companionship." She hopes her work and influence will inspire others to create robots "not only with smarts, but with heart, too."