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Uber's Defiance Of California On Self-Driving Car Rules Sparks Legal Brawl

Forbes

Uber says it intends to continue a self-driving car test program in San Francisco in defiance of warnings from California's Department of Motor Vehicles that it faces legal consequences for not getting a $150 permit for the project. The state Attorney General's office joined the DMV late Friday in demanding that Uber halt the program immediately. In a letter to Anthony Levandowski, head of the ride-hailing company's automated vehicle team, the state's highest legal office asked Uber to "adhere to California law and immediately remove its'self-driving' vehicles from the state's roadways until Uber complies with all applicable statutes and regulations." Should it fail to do so, "the Attorney General will seek injunctive and other appropriate relief," said Miguel Neri and Fiel Tigno, Supervising Deputy Attorneys General. State rules on autonomous vehicles "don't apply" to Uber's program, Levandowski said in a conference call earlier Friday.


Humans may temporarily FORGET how to steer when self-driving cars hand back control

Daily Mail

'Many people have been doing research on paying attention and situation awareness. 'But, in addition, there is this physical change and we need to acknowledge that people's performance might not be at its peak if they haven't actively been participating in the driving.' Watch out, Uber! BMW seeks to be'coolest' ride-hailing firm... Driverless cars are let loose at a Nissan production plant:... Now Apple invests in driverless cars: Firm finally admits... The car that means you'll never have to stop at a red light:... Watch out, Uber! BMW seeks to be'coolest' ride-hailing firm... Driverless cars are let loose at a Nissan production plant:... Now Apple invests in driverless cars: Firm finally admits... The car that means you'll never have to stop at a red light:...


New IoT App Makes Drivers Safer

#artificialintelligence

Transportation has become one of the most frequently highlighted areas where the internet of things can improve our lives. Specifically, a lot of people are excited about the IoT's potential to further the progress toward entire networks of self-driving cars. We hear a lot about the tech companies that are involved in building self-driving cars, but it's the IoT that will actually allow these vehicles to operate. In fact, CNET quoted one IoT expert just last year as saying that because of the expanding IoT, self-driving cars will rule the roads by 2030. On a much smaller scale, there are also some niche applications of the IoT that are designed to fix specific problems on the road.


Your car doesn't have to be "smart" to be a privacy concern ยป Behind the Headlines

#artificialintelligence

It not only knows where you you have been, but also how fast you were driving and how hard you brake. It can tell if you were the driver or if someone else was behind the wheel. Due to the connected nature of smart cars, it can share this data over web-based platforms. Over the last few decades, automobiles evolved from modes of transport into sensor-laden mobile computing platforms. While the sensor-generated data has enabled breakthroughs in safety features and performance, it also creates privacy concerns for drivers.


Distributed Deep Learning with Caffe Using a MapR Cluster

#artificialintelligence

Google, Baidu, and Microsoft have the resources to build dedicated deep learning clusters that give the deep learning algorithms a level of processing power that both accelerates training time as well as increases their model's accuracy. Yahoo, however, has taken a slightly different approach, by moving away from a dedicated deep learning cluster and combining Caffe with Spark. The ML Big Data team's CaffeOnSpark software has allowed them to run the entire process of building and deploying a deep learning model onto a single cluster. The MapR Converged Data Platform is the ideal platform for this project, giving you all the power of distributed Caffe on a cluster with enterprise-grade robustness, enabling you to take advantage of the MapR high performance file system.


The hottest new technologies are coming to cars

USATODAY

Many of these advancements are being driven by the interest in what's called ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistance Systems), the technology that will eventually lead to self-driving cars. The multiple cameras, LIDAR and other sensors being integrated into new models serve as inputs to sophisticated neural networks that are running inside the car. From more sophisticated entertainment features to better displays to more reliable connectivity, tech performance has largely overtaken driving performance for many modern buyers. USA TODAY columnist Bob O'Donnell is president and chief analyst of TECHnalysis Research, a market research and consulting firm that provides strategic consulting and market research services to the technology industry and professional financial community.