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Applications of theorem-proving to problem-solving

Classics

In Walker, D. E. & Norton, L. N. (eds. ), IJCAI 1969: INTERNATIONAL JOINT CONFERENCE ON ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, May 7-9, 1969 Washington, D. C., pp. 219-39.


COMPUTER SOLUTION OF CALCULUS WORD PROBLEMS

Classics

A program was writte n to solve calculus word problems. The program, CARPS (CAlculus Rate Problem Solver), is restricte d to rate problems. The overall plan of the program is simila r to Bobrow's STUDENT, the primary difference being the introductio n of "structures " as the internal model in CARPS. Structures are stored internally as trees, each structure holding the information gathered about one object.In Walker, D. E. & Norton, L. N. (eds. ), IJCAI 1969: INTERNATIONAL JOINT CONFERENCE ON ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, May 7-9, 1969 Washington, D. C., pp. 241-252


PLANNER: a language for proving theorems in robots

Classics

PLANNER is a language for proving theorems and manipulating models in a robot. The language is built out of a number of problem solving primitives together with a hierarchical control structure. Statements can be asserted and perhaps later withdrawn as the state of the world changes. Conclusions can be drawn from these various changes in state. Goals can be established and dismissed when they are satisfied . The deductive system of PLANNER is subordinate to the hierarchical control structure in order to make the language efficient . The use of a general purpose matching language makes the deductive system more powerful. In IJCAI-69, pp. 295-€“301.


Toward a Programming Laboratory

Classics

In IJCAI 1969: INTERNATIONAL JOINT CONFERENCE ON ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, May 7-9, 1969 Washington, D. C.






Some philosophical problems from the standpoint of artificial intelligence

Classics

"A computer program capable of acting intelligently in the world must have a general representation of the world in terms of which its inputs are interpreted. Designing such a program requires commitments about what knowledge is and how it is obtained. Thus, some of the major traditional problems of philosophy arise in artificial intelligence.More specifically, we want a computer program that decides what to do by inferring in a formal language that a certain strategy will achieve its assigned goal. This requires formalizing concepts of causality, ability, and knowledge. Such formalisms are also considered in philosophical logic." - from the Introduction reprinted in Matthew Ginsberg (ed.), Readings in Nonmonotonic Reasoning, pp. 26-45, San Francisco: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, Inc., 1987.Stanford web version. D. Michie and B. Meltzer (Eds.), Machine intelligence 4 - Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 463-502