AAAI Conferences


Modeling Player Experience with the N-Tuple Bandit Evolutionary Algorithm

AAAI Conferences

Automatic game design is an increasingly popular area of research that consists of devising systems that create content or complete games autonomously. The interest in such systems is two-fold: games can be highly stochastic environments that allow presenting this task as a complex optimization problem and automatic play-testing, becoming benchmarks to advance the state of the art on AI methods. In this paper, we propose a general approach that employs the N-Tuple Bandit Evolutionary Algorithm (NTBEA) to tune parameters of three different games of the General Video Game AI (GVGAI) framework. The objective is to adjust the game experience of the players so the distribution of score events through the game approximates certain pre-defined target curves. We report satisfactory results for different target score trends and games, paving the path for future research in the area of automatically tuning player experience.


Tracing Player Knowledge in a Parallel Programming Educational Game

AAAI Conferences

This paper focuses on tracing player knowledge in educational games. Specifically, given a set of concepts or skills required to master a game, the goal is to estimate the likelihood with which the current player has mastery of each of those concepts or skills. The main contribution of the paper is an approach that integrates machine learning and domain knowledge rules to find when the player applied a certain skill and either succeeded or failed. This is then given as input to a standard knowledge tracing module (such as those from Intelligent Tutoring Systems) to perform knowledge tracing. We evaluate our approach in the context of an educational game called Parallel to teach parallel and concurrent programming with data collected from real users, showing our approach can predict students skills with a low mean-squared error.


Exploring Gameplay With AI Agents

AAAI Conferences

The process of play testing a game is subjective, expensive and incomplete. In this paper, we present a play-testing approach that explores the game space with automated agents and collects data to answer questions posed by the designers. Rather than have agents interacting with an actual game client, this approach recreates the bare bone mechanics of the game as a separate system. Our agent is able to play in minutes what would take testers days of organic gameplay. The analysis of thousands of game simulations exposed imbalances in game actions, identified inconsequential rewards and evaluated the effectiveness of optional strategic choices. Our test case game, The Sims Mobile, was recently released and the findings shown here influenced design changes that resulted in improved player experience.


Exhaustive and Semi-Exhaustive Procedural Content Generation

AAAI Conferences

Within the area of procedural content generation (PCG) there are a wide range of techniques that have been used to generate content. Many of these techniques use traditional artificial intelligence approaches, such as genetic algorithms, planning, and answer-set programming. One area that has not been widely explored is straightforward combinatorial search -- exhaustive enumeration of the entire design space or a significant subset thereof. This paper synthesizes literature from mathematics and other subfields of Artificial Intelligence to provide reference for the algorithms needed when approaching exhaustive procedural content generation. It builds on this with algorithms for exhaustive search and complete examples how they can be applied in practice.


Matrix and Tensor Factorization Based Game Content Recommender Systems: A Bottom-Up Architecture and a Comparative Online Evaluation

AAAI Conferences

Players of digital games face numerous choices as to what kind of games to play and what kind of game content or in-game activities to opt for. Among these, game content plays an important role in keeping players engaged so as to increase revenues for the gaming industry. However, while nowadays a lot of game content is generated using procedural content generation, automatically determining the kind of content that suits players' skills still poses challenges to game developers. Addressing this challenge, we present matrix- and tensor factorization based game content recommender systems for recommending quests in a single player role-playing game. We discuss the theory behind latent factor models for recommender systems and derive an algorithm for tensor factorizations to decompose collections of bipartite matrices. Extensive online bucket type tests reveal that our novel recommender system retained more players and recommended more engaging quests than handcrafted content-based and previous collaborative filtering approaches.


Predicting Generated Story Quality with Quantitative Measures

AAAI Conferences

The ability of digital storytelling agents to evaluate their output is important for ensuring high-quality human-agent interactions. However, evaluating stories remains an open problem. Past evaluative techniques are either model-specific--- which measure features of the model but do not evaluate the generated stories ---or require direct human feedback, which is resource-intensive. We introduce a number of story features that correlate with human judgments of stories and present algorithms that can measure these features. We find this approach results in a proxy for human-subject studies for researchers evaluating story generation systems.


Exploratory Automated Analysis of Structural Features of Interactive Narrative

AAAI Conferences

Analysis of interactive narrative is a complex undertaking, requiring understanding of the narrative's design, its affordances, and its impact on players. Analysis is often performed by an expert, but this is expensive and difficult for complex interactive narratives. Automated analysis of structure, the organization of interaction elements, could help augment an expert's analysis. For this purpose we developed a model consisting of a set of metrics to analyze interactive narrative structure, enabled by a novel multi-graph representation. We implemented this model for an interactive scenario authoring tool called StudyCrafter and analyzed 20 student-designed scenarios. We show that the model illuminates the structures and groupings of the scenarios. This work provides insight for manual analysis of attributes of interactive narratives and a starting point for automated design assistance.


Evolving Behaviors for an Interactive Cube-Based Artifact

AAAI Conferences

In the present paper we explore the idea of combining computation power and the availability of ordinary art spectators in order to produce new interactive art works. This is investigated for a particular application, which consists of producing new behaviors for a programmable art apparatus named C3 Cubes. Given the nature of the problem and some difficult challenges to be dealt with, an Interactive Evolutionary Computation (IEC) approach was devised. Furthermore, it was necessary to adopt a surrogate function method for approximating the user's preferences and to implement a Web-based virtual simulation environment for speeding up the generation and the evaluation of C3 Cubes projects. The integration of all these elements is crucial for producing new user-guided cube projects with interesting behaviors. The main approaches experimented in this research and the proposed design solutions are useful to solving similar problems in other domain areas, for example, in the context of game design.


Action Abstractions for Combinatorial Multi-Armed Bandit Tree Search

AAAI Conferences

Search algorithms based on combinatorial multi-armed bandits (CMABs) are promising for dealing with state-space sequential decision problems. However, current CMAB-based algorithms do not scale to problem domains with very large actions spaces, such as real-time strategy games played in large maps. In this paper we introduce CMAB-based search algorithms that use action abstraction schemes to reduce the action space considered during search. One of the approaches we introduce use regular action abstractions (A1N), while the other two use asymmetric action abstractions (A2N and A3N). Empirical results on MicroRTS show that A1N, A2N, and A3N are able to outperform an existing CMAB-based algorithm in matches played in large maps, and A3N is able to outperform all state-of-the-art search algorithms tested.


Player Experience Extraction from Gameplay Video

AAAI Conferences

The ability to extract the sequence of game events for a given player's play-through has traditionally required access to the game's engine or source code. This serves as a barrier to researchers, developers, and hobbyists who might otherwise benefit from these game logs. In this paper we present two approaches to derive game logs from game video via convolutional neural networks and transfer learning. We evaluate the approaches in a Super Mario Bros. clone, Mega Man and Skyrim. Our results demonstrate our approach outperforms random forest and other transfer baselines.