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Study from Project Management Institute Identifies Six AI Technologies

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Project Management Institute released its 2019 Pulse of the Profession In-Depth Report: AI Innovators: Cracking the Code on Project Performance. The report provides an in-depth look at how artificial intelligence (AI) is impacting organizations and the project management profession. Findings reveal that AI disruption is happening and at a large scale: 81 percent of respondents report their organization is being impacted by AI technologies; 37 percent say adopting AI technologies is a high priority for their organization; and project professionals say they expect the proportion of the projects they manage using AI will jump from 23 to 37 percent over the next three years. These insights from a survey of 551 project management practitioners globally show that the presence of AI technologies will continue to grow, requiring shifts in how projects are managed and how organizations implement strategy. The report identifies six AI technologies that are impacting organizations globally.


The Most Important Questions You Should Be Asking About AI

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With all of the conversation about AI and machine learning, it's easy to get lost. And when you're looking at an AI-based solution for your company, the vendor's primary goal is to sell, and in an effort to do that, they may tell you whatever sounds good or what they think you want to hear. So how do you, as a technology and/or business decision-maker, ensure that when engaging with an AI vendor, you're not jumping headfirst into the wrong pond? It's not an exact science, but there are three key questions you need to ask first. And if any prospect can't answer these, you might want to look elsewhere.


Confessions of an accidental doom-monger

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IT IS ONE of the most widely quoted statistics of recent years. No report or conference presentation on the future of work is complete without it. Think-tanks, consultancies, government agencies and news outlets have pointed to it as evidence of an imminent jobs apocalypse. The finding--that 47% of American jobs are at high risk of automation by the mid-2030s--comes from a paper published in 2013 by two Oxford academics, Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne. It has since been cited in more than 4,000 other academic articles.


Wayfair Walkout, Facebook Data Value, and More News

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Tech employees are taking a stand against migrant detention centers; a proposal asking tech companies to disclose the value of your data; and a live reading of the Mueller report. Here's the news you need to know, in two minutes or less. Want to receive this two-minute roundup as an email every weekday? This afternoon, 550 employees at the Boston-based ecommerce company Wayfair staged a walkout opposing sale of company furniture to migrant detention centers. Last week, Wayfair workers discovered an order for $200,000 worth of beds and other furniture reportedly placed by government contractor BCFS for a new detention center in Carrizo Springs, Texas.


Futurism A.I.

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Futurism A.I. (Series 01) launch event 06.26.19 at Lucidworks Artificial Intelligence (AI) has become a key element in the digitalization of in-store retail by personalizing the customer experience and creating a more engaged business-to-consumer interaction. For retail companies, AI creates an opportunity to bridge the gap between virtual and physical sales channels. Artificial intelligence (AI) is a segment of computer science that typically refers to the creation of machines or computers capable of intelligent behavior. . Agnieszka Pilat is a Polish painter based in San Francisco. A desire to tell stories drew Pilat to the arts.


AI Software Reveals the Inner Workings of Short-term Memory

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Research by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago shows how short-term, working memory uses networks of neurons differently depending on the complexity of the task at hand. The researchers used modern artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to train computational neural networks to solve a range of complex behavioral tasks that required storing information in short term memory. The AI networks were based on the biological structure of the brain and revealed two distinct processes involved in short-term memory. One, a "silent" process where the brain stores short-term memories without ongoing neural activity, and a second, more active process where circuits of neurons fire continuously. The study, led by Nicholas Masse, PhD, a senior scientist at UChicago, and senior author David Freedman, PhD, professor of neurobiology, was published this week in Nature Neuroscience.


The AI Future for Human Resources Is Already Here

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Far from science fiction, artificial intelligence is rapidly becoming a part of Human Resources practices. Artificial intelligence is being designed into every transactional application. No vendor conversation is without a discussion of how the technology is AI enabled. How can you tell the difference? And what is the future for HR as AI applications increasingly take over so much of the work in very area from benefits and performance to recruiting, sourcing and succession?


The first AI universe sim is fast and accurate -- and its creators don't know how it works

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For the first time, astrophysicists have used artificial intelligence techniques to generate complex 3D simulations of the universe. The results are so fast, accurate and robust that even the creators aren't sure how it all works. "We can run these simulations in a few milliseconds, while other'fast' simulations take a couple of minutes," says study co-author Shirley Ho, a group leader at the Flatiron Institute's Center for Computational Astrophysics in New York City and an adjunct professor at Carnegie Mellon University. The speed and accuracy of the project, called the Deep Density Displacement Model, or D3M for short, wasn't the biggest surprise to the researchers. The real shock was that D3M could accurately simulate how the universe would look if certain parameters were tweaked -- such as how much of the cosmos is dark matter -- even though the model had never received any training data where those parameters varied.


The first AI universe sim is fast and accurate -- and its creators don't know how it works

#artificialintelligence

For the first time, astrophysicists have used artificial intelligence techniques to generate complex 3D simulations of the universe. The results are so fast, accurate and robust that even the creators aren't sure how it all works. "We can run these simulations in a few milliseconds, while other'fast' simulations take a couple of minutes," says study co-author Shirley Ho, a group leader at the Flatiron Institute's Center for Computational Astrophysics in New York City and an adjunct professor at Carnegie Mellon University. The speed and accuracy of the project, called the Deep Density Displacement Model, or D3M for short, wasn't the biggest surprise to the researchers. The real shock was that D3M could accurately simulate how the universe would look if certain parameters were tweaked -- such as how much of the cosmos is dark matter -- even though the model had never received any training data where those parameters varied.


Artificial Intelligence to Improve Patient Care

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In partnership with local health insurer, CDPHP, researchers from the Institute for Data Exploration and Applications (IDEA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are using artificial intelligence to improve patient health by developing a better understanding of high needs patients and identifying aspects of care that lead to better outcomes. "It's not enough to just figure out who are the highest needs patients, you really need to know why and what approaches can help them," said Kristin Bennett, a Rensselaer math professor and associate director of IDEA. "Our approach develops explainable models that help us understand who these high needs patients are, why some people in this group do well, and some do not." The project builds on the "cadre" modeling technique developed by Bennett. As opposed to deep learning, in which a computer identifies a pattern but the path to its decision is not clear, cadre models bring another level of understanding into the equation.