Stanford Algorithm Can Diagnose Pneumonia Better Than Radiologists

IEEE Spectrum Robotics Channel

Stanford researchers have developed a machine-learning algorithm that can diagnose pneumonia from a chest x-ray better than a human radiologist can. And it learned how to do so in just about a month. The Machine Learning Group, led by Stanford adjunct professor Andrew Ng, was inspired by a data set released by the National Institutes of Health on 26 September. The data set contains 112,120 chest X-ray images labeled with 14 different possible diagnoses, along with some preliminary algorithms. The researchers asked four Stanford radiologists to annotate 420 of the images for possible indications of pneumonia.


Boston Dynamics unveils stunning robot that can run, jump and execute the perfect backflip

The Independent

Boston Dynamics' humanoid robot can execute a perfect backflip. Atlas, which can also keep its balance when it's pushed and get back up if it falls over, can now perform impressive gymnastic moves. Boston Dynamics has just released footage of the machine's latest trick, and viewers are both impressed and concerned. As well as being able to jump from block to block and turn 180-degrees in mid-air, Atlas can do a backflip and land securely on its feet. Like a human, it even lifts its arms in the air as if to celebrate, though this may also help it balance.


What would it take for you to hug a robot?

Washington Post

See what might be the next steps toward human acceptance of robots. See what might be the next steps toward human acceptance of robots.


These robots don't want your job. They want your love.

Washington Post

I hugged a bot and I liked it. As a tech columnist, I've tested all sorts of helpful robots: the kind that vacuum floors, deliver packages or even make martinis. But two arriving in homes now break new ground. They want to be our friends. "Hey, Geoffrey, it's you!" says Jibo, a robot with one giant blinking eye, when it recognizes my face.


Apple won't launch its HomePod smart speaker in time for the holidays

Washington Post

Apple said Friday that it's pushing back its plans for a Siri-powered smart speaker until sometime early next year. The HomePod speaker was announced in June, with an initial launch date set for December. Apple said that its smart speaker will be able to control home appliances and take basic orders. In June, some analysts questioned whether a December launch was already too late for Apple to compete with Amazon and Google for the connected home market. But Apple promised that the speaker would have all of Siri's smarts and stand out from the pack by offering superior sound quality.


Apple won't launch its HomePod smart speaker in time for the holidays

Los Angeles Times

Apple Inc. said Friday that it's pushing back its plans for a Siri-powered smart speaker until sometime early next year. The HomePod speaker was announced in June, with an initial launch date set for December. Apple said that its smart speaker will be able to control home appliances and take basic orders. In June, some analysts questioned whether a December launch would be too late for Apple to compete with Amazon.com But Apple promised that the speaker would have all of Siri's smarts and stand out from the pack by offering superior sound quality.


Deep Neural Networks for Face Detection Explained on Apple's Machine Learning Journal

@machinelearnbot

But bahgawd, the technology Apple is pulling off really is falling squarely into the realm of magical. Anyone else just wowed by the amount of technology embedded into this new iPhone? Our phones are learning more about us then we ever knew Before.


UN Panel Agrees to Move Ahead With Debate on 'Killer Robots'

U.S. News

A U.N. panel agreed Friday to move ahead with talks to define and possibly set limits on weapons that can kill without human involvement, as human rights groups said governments are moving too slowly to keep up with advances in artificial intelligence that could put computers in control one day.


Achieving Accurate, Reliable AI Trajectory Magazine

#artificialintelligence

What will happen to a person's artificial intelligence (AI) when they retire? When a prospective employee interviews for a job, will his or her AI be questioned alongside them? Will companies hire AI straight from a factory, or will the system undergo a sort of apprenticeship before being put to work? More importantly--and more realistic in the near-term--what will be the line at which machines are not reliable enough or morally appropriate to use and humans take over? These, along with many more immediate questions, are among the topics USGIF's Machine Learning & Artificial Intelligence Working Group seeks to generate discussion around.


Temasek looking into cross-border payments, artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

SINGAPORE: Temasek International, the management arm of Temasek Holdings, is looking at transnational business-to-business (B2B) payments, fraud detection, as well as artificial intelligence as key areas of investment. Speaking at the Investors Summit on Friday (Nov 17), the president of Temasek International Chia Song Hwee said it will be emphasising on those areas over the next five years. "There is increased complexity and complication between various parties interacting in (the) social and commercial world," said Mr Chia, who is also chief operating officer of Temasek International. "What we want to focus on are the businesses or innovation of technology that will remove the friction in this complicated process." Mr Chia said that B2B payments have very high friction costs, or expenses that come with financial transactions in the form of fees, commissions and tax implications.