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Why Responsible AI is Built Around Human-Centred Design - IT News Africa - Up to date technology news, IT news, Digital news, Telecom news, Mobile news, Gadgets news, Analysis and Reports

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Responsible artificial intelligence (AI) provides a framework for building trust in the AI solutions of an organisation, according to a report from Accenture. It is defined as the practice of designing, developing, and deploying AI with good intention to empower employees and businesses, and fairly impact customers and society. In turn, this allows companies to stimulate trust and scale AI with confidence. With technology starting to become commonplace, more organisations around the world are seeing the need to adopt responsible AI. For example, Microsoft relies on an AI, Ethics, and Effects in Engineering and Research (Aether) Committee to advise its leadership on the challenges and opportunities presented by AI innovations. Some of the elements the committee examines is how fairly AI systems treat people, the reliability and safety of AI systems, how AI systems empower employees to engage with one other, and how understandable AI systems are.


The role of Artificial Intelligence in modern businesses and marketing

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The role of Artificial Intelligence in modern businesses and marketing The role of Artificial Intelligence in modern businesses and marketing Among all the new innovations, the role of artificial intelligence (AI) has become more important. Published Tweet Embracing new technologies has become a significant facet in the development of businesses in modern times. In order to grow in the market, businesses have to be dynamic. The adoption of new tech innovations has enabled businesses to manage business operations very efficiently. The marketing on the internet has also become more emphasized as a special target market can be reached through new digital tools. Among all the new innovations, the role of artificial intelligence (AI) has become more important. This technology helps businesses to save money as well as time whether it comes to marketing or operating various activities of the businesses .


Bringing Quantum to Machine Learning

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Becoming a physicist was not Maria Schuld's life goal. As an undergrad, she started out studying political science, taking physics in parallel. Her plan was to work for a nonprofit organization in a capacity that had a very clear benefit to society. But then, she says, "life happened"--jobs fell through and other opportunities opened up--and she found herself with a career in quantum machine learning. Today Schuld, who works for the Canadian quantum computing company Xanadu from her home in South Africa, says that she has matured in what she thinks it means for a person to benefit society.


AI and Telemedicine for the Retina Specialist

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We also review Notal Vision's ForseeHome device and the company's Home OCT AI-enable platform for monitoring AMD. Kester Nahen, PhD, is the chief executive officer at Notal Vision. We'd love to hear from you! Send your comments/questions to Dr. Mali at eyecareinsider@healio.com.


Can artificial intelligence give elephants a winning edge? – TechCrunch

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Images of elephants roaming the African plains are imprinted on all of our minds and something easily recognized as a symbol of Africa. But the future of elephants today is uncertain. An elephant is currently being killed by poachers every 15 minutes, and humans, who love watching them so much, have declared war on their species. Most people are not poachers, ivory collectors or intentionally harming wildlife, but silence or indifference to the battle at hand is as deadly. You can choose to read this article, feel bad for a moment and then move on to your next email and start your day.


Global Machine Learning as a Service (MLaaS) Market 2020 Industry Scenario – Amazon, Alibaba, Microsoftn, Oracle – The Daily Philadelphian

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MarketsandResearch.biz has added an exhaustive research study of Global Machine Learning as a Service (MLaaS) Market 2020 by Company, Regions, Type and Application, Forecast to 2025 that represents a basic overview of the market in which historical information related to the market such as market size, status, competitor segment, key vendors, top regions, product types, and end industries has been provided. The report highlights new business opportunities and existing marketing strategies through insights regarding SWOT analysis, market valuation, competitive spectrum, regional share, and revenue predictions. The market is suitably segmented and sub-segmented so that it can shed light on every aspect of the global Machine Learning as a Service (MLaaS) market such as the type of product, application, and region. It also reveals the competition landscape of the companies and the flow of the global supply and consumption. The report offers a granular analysis of insights into various developments, historical data, current scenario, and future predictions.


Can artificial intelligence give elephants a winning edge?

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BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW: Adam Benzion Contributor Adam Benzion is a serial entrepreneur, writer, tech investor, co-founder of Hackster.io and the CXO of Edge Impulse. Images of elephants roaming the African plains are imprinted on all of our minds and something easily recognized as a symbol of Africa. But the future of elephants today is uncertain. An elephant is currently being killed by poachers every 15 minutes, and humans, who love watching them so much, have declared war on their species. Most people are not poachers, ivory collectors or intentionally harming wildlife, but silence or indifference to the battle at hand is as deadly. You can choose to read this article, feel bad for a moment and then move on to your next email and start your day. Or, perhaps you will pause and think: Our opportunities to help save wildlife, especially elephants, are right in front of us and grow every day. And some of these opportunities are


IBM claims its AI can improve neonatal outcomes and predict the onset of Type 1 diabetes

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IBM this week presented research investigating how AI and machine learning could be used to improve maternal health in developing countries and predict the onset and progression of Type 1 diabetes. In a study funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, IBM researchers built models to analyze demographic datasets from African countries, finding "data-supported" links between the number of years between pregnancies and the size of a woman's social network with birth outcomes. In a separate work, a team from IBM analyzed data across three decades and four countries to attempt to anticipate the onset of Type 1 diabetes anywhere from 3 to 12 months before it's typically diagnosed and then predict its progression. They claim one of the models accurately predicted progression 84% of the time. Despite a global decline in child mortality rates, many countries aren't on track to achieving proposed targets of ending preventable deaths among newborns and children under the age of 5. Unsurprisingly, the progress toward these targets remains uneven, reflected in disparities in access to healthcare services and inequitable resource allocation. Toward potential solutions, researchers at IBM attempted to identify features associated with neonatal mortality "as captured in nationally representative cross-sectional data."


'Samsung AI Forum 2020' Explores the Future of Artificial Intelligence

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JOHANNESBURG, South Africa – 19 November, 2020 – Samsung has announced that it will hold the Samsung AI Forum 2020 online via its YouTube channel for two days from November 2nd to 3rd. Marking its fourth anniversary this year, the forum gathers world-renowned academics and industry experts on artificial intelligence (AI) and serves as a platform for exchanging ideas, insights and latest research findings, as well as a platform to discuss the future of AI. On Day 1, which will be hosted by Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT), Samsung's R&D hub dedicated to cutting-edge future technologies, Dr. Kinam Kim, Vice Chairman & CEO of Device Solutions at Samsung Electronics will deliver opening remarks. Renowned AI experts will subsequently give presentations under the theme "AI Technologies for Changes in the Real World." This year, Dr. Inyup Kang, President of System LSI Business at Samsung Electronics will join the panel discussion with the presenters.


Alphabets and their origins

Science

Written communication is among the greatest inventions in human history, yet reading and writing are skills most of us take for granted. After we learn them at school, we seldom stop to think about the mental-cum-physical process that turns our language and thoughts into symbols on a piece of paper or computer screen, or the reverse process whereby our brains extract meaning from written symbols. The neural correlates of reading remain a mystery to neuroscientists. They once assumed that an auditory pathway in the brain was used for alphabetic symbols and a visual pathway for Chinese characters but have since discovered experimentally that both neural pathways are used together—if in differing proportions—in each instance. Meanwhile, key aspects of writing's development have yet to be demystified by archaeologists and philologists. Was there a single origin, circa 3100 BCE—either cuneiform in Mesopotamia or hieroglyphs in Egypt—or did writing arise in multiple places independently? When and how did Chinese characters, first identified on Shang oracle bones dated to circa 1200 BCE, originate? And what prompted the invention of the radically simple alphabetic principle, circa 1800 BCE, in a script that contains certain signs resembling Egyptian hieroglyphs? The Secret History of Writing —a BBC television series broadcast in three parts, two of which have been adapted as NOVA's A to Z: The First Alphabet and A to Z: How Writing Changed the World —explores these questions and more. Both versions of the series are intelligent, articulate, and visually imaginative, discussing five millennia of writing—by hand, by printing, and by computer keyboard. The programs feature notable scholars of many scripts and cultures, such as Assyriologist Irving Finkel, Egyptologist Pierre Tallet, and Sinologist Yongsheng Chen, interviewed by Lydia Wilson, an academic with expertise in medieval Arabic philosophy and the winning ability to interrogate authorities at their own level while rendering their views broadly understandable and engaging. The idea for the series grew from a long-standing friendship between writer-director David Sington and calligrapher Brody Neuenschwander, who charismatically demonstrates his skill at penning ancient and modern scripts, using materials such as Egyptian papyrus, European parchment, and Islamic paper. At one point, Neuenschwander observes that Latin alphabetic letter forms, unlike calligraphic scripts such as Chinese and Arabic, were ideally shaped for the movable metal type created by Johannes Gutenberg in the 1450s—a technology that enabled the growth of European literacy and the European scientific revolution beginning in the 16th century. The pairing was so ideal, in fact, that the Gutenberg Bible fooled some scholars for centuries, who believed it was handwritten and cataloged it as such. “I think Gutenberg would have been delighted by our confusion, because what he was trying to achieve with the printing of this book was to produce a book, by a new technique, that people would think was just as good as the manuscripts that they were used to buying and reading,” observes archivist Giles Mandelbrote. He was trying to do “something new that would seem old.” In another scene, Finkel, a lifelong scholar of cuneiform at the British Museum, avidly dissects a few signs on early clay tablets to explain the rebus principle, which permits the sounds of pictograms, written together, to express the sound of an unrelated, nonpictographic word. Thus, for example, the plainly pictographic Sumerian sign for barley, pronounced “she,” can be written beside the pictographic sign for milk, pronounced “ga,” to create two signs read as “shega,” meaning something like “beautiful.” As Finkel reasonably speculates, rebuses are so “obvious” that they could have been developed in languages anywhere in the world, supporting the hypothesis that writing may have arisen on multiple, separate occasions. Today, pictography has returned to writing in the form of international transport symbols and computerized emojis. Meanwhile, many young people in China, having become habituated to smartphone writing, are increasingly using the Romanized spelling known as Pinyin (“spell sound”) and, as a result, some no longer know how to write Chinese characters. Could smartphones, or the internet more generally, eventually lead to a universal writing system, independent of particular languages, like the one envisioned by polymath Gottfried Leibniz in 1698? It is unlikely, in my view, and, according to Wilson, undesirable. “A world of perfect communication is also a world of cultural uniformity,” she cautions.