hospital


Automation Anywhere Delivers Business Continuity with RPA

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Automation Anywhere, a global leader in Robotic Process Automation (RPA), announced the launch of Bot Security, the industry's first security program to set the standard for securing software bots that enable business continuity. The magnitude of the coronavirus (Covid-19) outbreak has organizations around the world looking to technologies like RPA and intelligent automation to help mitigate disruptions and advance public health, keep global supply chains moving and governments afloat. The company introduced a flexible, multi-tiered framework to certify that bots built by customers, partners, and publishers of bots on Bot Store – the world's largest intelligent automation marketplace with more than 850 pre-built bots – are pre-certified and trusted to scale RPA more rapidly and securely. With Bot Security, users downloading ready-to-deploy intelligent software bots no longer have to compromise on security as they build RPA solutions to access critical data, track the virus's spread and direct citizens to vital information from trusted sources. Automation Anywhere leads the industry as the first vendor to offer a web-based, cloud-native RPA platform that is System and Organization Controls (SOC) 2 Type 1 certified.


Artificial intelligence to predict which COVID-19 patients need ventilators

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Experts at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, have begun using artificial intelligence to create computer models that calculate the risk of a corona patient's needing intensive care or a ventilator. As coronavirus patients are hospitalized, it is difficult for doctors to predict which of them will require intensive care and a respirator. Many different factors come into play, some yet to be fully understood by doctors . As such, computer scientists at the University of Copenhagen are now developing computer models based on artificial intelligence that calculate the risk of an individual patient's need for a ventilator or intensive care. The new initiative is being conducted in a collaboration with Rigshospitalet and Bispebjerg Hospital.


Where you should drop Deep Learning in favor of Constraint Solvers

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Machine Learning and Deep Learning are ongoing buzzwords in the industry. Branding ahead of functionalities led to Deep Learning being overused in many artificial intelligence applications. This post will provide a quick grasp at constraint satisfaction, a powerful yet underused approach which can tackle a large number of problems in AI and other areas of computer science, from logistics and scheduling to temporal reasoning and graph problems. Let's consider a factual and highly topical problem. Hospitals must organize quickly to treat ill people.


Drones and self-driving robots used to fight coronavirus in China

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China is deploying robots and drones to remotely disinfect hospitals, deliver food and enforce quarantine restrictions as part of the effort to fight coronavirus. Chinese state media has reported that drones and robots are being used by the government to cut the risk of person-to-person transmission of the disease. There are 780 million people that are on some form of residential lockdown in China. Wuhan, the city where the viral outbreak began, has been sealed off from the outside world for weeks. The global death toll from coronavirus topped 2,100 people this week, with over 74,000 infected.


How can AI contribute to combat the Coronavirus Outbreak?

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With the number of Coronavirus cases increasing every day, it is evident that the entire world is struggling to triumph over this deadly disease. While the top health organizations are aiding funds to facilitate research, many believe that the artificial intelligence might help in decelerating the crisis. Let's have a look at how artificial intelligence can help in overcoming this pandemic situation: Artificial Intelligence, aka AI, may see coming pandemics, which will give us sufficient time to prepare. According to Forbes, a Canada based development company had warned of this threat a few days before the authorities issued public warnings. This clearly depicts that the earlier we can track the virus, the better we can fight it.


Tommy the robot nurse helps keep Italy doctors safe from coronavirus - Reuters

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VARESE, Italy (Reuters) - He doesn't wear a mask but he is helping save lives from coronavirus just the same. Tommy is one of six new robots helping flesh-and-blood doctors and nurses care for coronavirus patients at the Circolo Hospital in Varese, a city in the northern Lombardy region that is the epicenter of the outbreak in Italy. "It's like having another nurse without problems related to infection," said Doctor Francesco Dentali, director of intensive care at the hospital. The child-size robots with large blinking eyes are wheeled into rooms and left by a patient's bedside so doctors can look after others who are in more serious conditions. They monitor parameters from equipment in the room, relaying them to hospital staff.


Stanford launches an accelerated test of AI to help with Covid-19 care

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In the heart of Silicon Valley, Stanford clinicians and researchers are exploring whether artificial intelligence could help manage a potential surge of Covid-19 patients -- and identify patients who will need intensive care before their condition rapidly deteriorates. The challenge is not to build the algorithm -- the Stanford team simply picked an off-the-shelf tool already on the market -- but rather to determine how to carefully integrate it into already-frenzied clinical operations. "The hardest part, the most important part of this work is not the model development. But it's the workflow design, the change management, figuring out how do you develop that system the model enables," said Ron Li, a Stanford physician and clinical informaticist leading the effort. Li will present the work on Wednesday at a virtual conference hosted by Stanford's Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence.


Diagnostics, Monitoring, Drug Discovery: How AI Is Fighting COVID-19

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Suki, a startup that makes an AI-powered voice assistant for doctors, received two pieces of news from major clients less than three weeks ago. The first was that they'd need the product to accommodate telemedicine visits. The second was that they'd need autofilled clinical notes to quickly process patients who test positive for COVID-19 -- "Hey, Suki, write up a completed clinical note for COVID-19." The clients sent Suki their requirements and the data they'd gathered so far, and CEO Punit Soni called a meeting with his COO, head of customer success, product lead, sales lead and marketing lead. The meeting lasted 20 minutes.


IoT and AI Aid Critical Event Management to Battle COVID-19, but Deployment could Raise Privacy Concerns

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In coping with an emerging crisis, the need for accurate and actionable information is paramount for effective response – but there has never before been a scenario like the current COVID-19 pandemic. Responders are looking to new technologies including IoT and AI to help tackle this outbreak, but their deployment may have a far-reaching impact on our privacy. How can these technologies contribute to response, both globally and locally – and what privacy concerns could they raise, both now and in the months to follow? The evolution of IoT and AI has grown to the point where these technologies can now be called on to make a real contribution to responding to a crisis manifesting both globally and locally. Globally, modern analytics can learn about the factors of spread that can help analysts identify where actions need to be taken.


Hackers target health care AI amid coronavirus pandemic

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The health care sector has increasingly turned to artificial intelligence to aid in everything from performing surgeries to helping diagnose and predict outcomes of patient illnesses. But as the coronavirus crisis ramps up, and hackers turn their eyes toward the health sector, experts warn these systems and the patients they support are increasingly at risk. "Obviously any disruption or denial of service of any type of medical health technology which interrupts patient care is definitely a significant issue," said John Riggi, the senior adviser for cybersecurity and risk at the American Hospital Association (AHA). "Worst-case scenario, life-saving medical devices may be rendered inoperable." AI systems have gradually been integrated into health care in the United States, often used to help speed diagnoses, such as reading X-rays, and for determining risks to patients.