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Health & Medicine


Opinion Artificial Intelligence Can Serve Democracy – IAM Network

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The U.S. is using every tool at its disposal to defeat the novel coronavirus, including artificial intelligence. American laboratories are harnessing AI to discover new therapeutics. The Food and Drug Administration approved an AI tool to help detect coronavirus in CT scans. And the White House led an initiative to create a database with more than 128,000 articles that scientists can analyze using AI to help understand the virus better and develop treatments.


Deep Learning Boosts Call Center Speech Recognition During the COVID-19 Crisis – IAM Network

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A business operation hard hit by COVID-19 is the call center. Industries ranging from airlines to retailers to financial institutions have been bombarded with calls--forcing them to put customers on hold for hours at a time or send them straight to voicemail. A recent study from Tethr of roughly 1 million customer service calls showed that in just two weeks, companies saw the percentage of calls scored as "difficult" double from 10 percent to more than 20 percent. Issues stemming from COVID-19--such as travel cancellations and gym membership disputes--have also raised customer anxiety, making call center representatives' jobs that much more challenging. Companies thinking about investing in speech recognition should consider a deep learning-based approach, and what to take into consideration before implementing it.


Global Robotic Sensors Market 2020- Technologies, Global Markets and Key Players Including Advanced Microsensors Inc., Bosch Sensortec GmbH, Cyberoptics Corp. and Electro-Sensors Inc – IAM Network

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The "Sensors for Robotics: Technologies and Global Markets" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering This report sizes the market by technology, including sensors within the vision, touch, hearing, and movement segments. The top seven application areas are sized, forecast, and discussed in-depth. These include agriculture, appliances, automotive, healthcare, industrial, logistics, and military. In addition, the overall market and each application area are assessed on a worldwide and regional basis, including North America, Latin America, Europe, the Middle East and Africa, and Asia-Pacific. This report considers the economic slowdown caused by lockdown across the world owing to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Council Post: The Temptations Of Artificial Intelligence Technology And The Price Of Admission

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If your work puts you in regular contact with technology vendors, you'll have heard terms such as artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML), natural language processing and computer vision before. You'll have heard that AI/ML is the future, that the boundaries of these technologies are constantly being pushed and broadened, and that AI/ML will play an integral role in shaping this tech-forward era's most successful business models. As a technology leader, I've heard all these claims and more. To say that AI/ML will play an increasingly impactful role in business is no overstatement. According to a recent Forbes article, the machine learning market is poised to more than quadruple in the coming years.


When not to use machine learning or AI

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Imagine that you've just managed to get your hands on a dataset from a clinical trial. Pretend that these datapoints map out the relationship between the treatment day (input "feature") and the correct dosage of some miracle cure in milligrams (output "prediction") that a patient should receive for over the course of 60 days. Now imagine that you're treating a patient and it's day 2. What dose do you suggest we use? I really hope you answered "17mg" since this was definitely not supposed to be a trick question. Now, how would you build software to output the right doses on days 1–5?


Eyeing higher automation, TCS launches AI workspace management solution

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Given that the pandemic is unlikely to abate anytime soon and availability of human workforce therefore seen stretched, companies may be forced to invest in automation faster, industry experts believe. On an immediate basis, businesses are likely to migrate to simpler solutions such as chatbots and backend processing automation solutions which are less capital intensive than large scale industrial automation. But in the long run, experts feel, more critical human functions are likely to go the way of machines and companies that provide these solutions are rapidly rolling out offerings. In a Forrester report, analyst Andrew Hewitt noted that "81% of global services decision makers say their firms are undergoing or investigating a digital transformation, and 35% of those are investing in workforce enablement technology to drive it." AI.Digital Workspace adds to the comprehensive ignio suite of offerings that leverages artificial intelligence and machine learning to address business needs, including operations management, workload management, ERP operations and cognitive procurement.


Glasses that can monitor your health and let you play video games with your eyes are developed

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Multifunction glasses that can monitor your health, let you play video games with your eyes and still work as sunglasses are developed by South Korean scientists. The groundbreaking new wearable tech built at Korea University, Seoul, can provide more advanced personal health data than devices like Fitbits or smart watches. Devices that measure electrical signals from the brain or eyes can help to diagnose conditions like epilepsy and sleep disorders -- as well as in controlling computers. A long-running challenge in measuring these electronic signals, however, has been in developing devices that can maintain the needed steady physical contact between the wearable's sensors and the user's skin. The researchers overcame this issue by integrating soft, conductive electrodes into their glasses that can wirelessly monitor the electrical signals.


'Passive' visual stimuli is needed to build sophisticated AI

Daily Mail - Science & tech

'Passive' visual experiences play a key part in our early learning experiences and should be replicated in AI vision systems, according to neuroscientists. Italian researchers argue there are two types of learning – passive and active – and both are crucial in the development of our vision and understanding of the world. Who we become as adults depends on the first years of life from these two types of stimulus – 'passive' observations of the world around us and'active' learning of what we are taught explicitly. In experiments, the scientists demonstrated the importance of the passive experience for the proper functioning of key nerve cells involved in our ability to see. This could lead to direct improvements in new visual rehabilitation therapies or machine learning algorithms employed by artificial vision systems, they claim.


Automatic refill: Driverless prescription delivery is here

ZDNet

A company targeting the nascent driverless urban delivery market is now testing an autonomous prescription delivery service. Nuro, which has been opening up delivery testbeds and was recently awarded a DOT exemption for driverless delivery, has revealed plans along with CVS Pharmacy to test prescription delivery in Houston, Texas, beginning in June. Founded by former Google engineers Jiajun Zhu and Dave Ferguson, Nuro's business model is to deploy a fleet of small, self-driving vans on an as-a-service basis for last-mile urban delivery. According to the company, its pint-sized, battery-powered vans are safer than human-piloted vehicles and will relieve congestion and pollution by taking bigger delivery trucks off crowded city streets. The prescription delivery testbed is a first-of-its-kind rollout in the autonomous delivery space and suggests significant faith in Nuro's identification and security protocols by CVS and the city of Houston.


The CEO's guide to safely reopening the workplace

MIT Technology Review

Perhaps the single biggest implication of reopening national economies is that responsibility and thus liability for dealing with the covid-19 pandemic will shift from the public to the private sector. Fortune 500 CEOs and small business owners alike will soon be making decisions that affect the health not only of their business but also their people (employees, contractors, customers, suppliers)--which in turn affects the health of their families, friends, and neighbors. With so much at stake, how should business leaders plan for operating in the post-stay-at-home phase of the recovery? The current crisis is driven by a health problem: we don't yet have a treatment or a vaccine for the novel coronavirus. Managers have little control over that.