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Amazon's Echo Look fashion camera will stop working on July 24th

Engadget

We hope you wren't leaning on Amazon's Echo Look for fashion advice -- you'll have to find an alternative soon. Simply put, the company no longer feels the Look is necessary given recent changes. Now that Style by Alexa features have found their way into Alexa devices and the Amazon Shopping app, "it's time to wind down" the Look, a spokesperson said. You can read the complete statement below. You aren't completely stranded if the smart camera was a mainstay of your morning routine.


Delivery robots maneuvering to devour food delivery market

ZDNet

It's free if you're a healthcare worker in certain areas in the U.S. and U.K. served by Starship Technologies, one of a handful of robotic delivery companies whose business models have been in hyper-drive these last few months. As restrictions related to COVID-19 gradually ease, developers and service providers in the autonomous delivery space are scrambling to eat as much market share as possible in the still-limited locations where they're authorized. But even robotic delivery, which seems perfectly tailored to the locked-in reality of early 2020, hasn't been spared by the pandemic, and these next few weeks will set the tone for the sector for years to come. In general, the food delivery market is walking a fine line, attempting a sensitive response to the upheaval of these last few months while also keenly aware that there's a customer grab underway and the landscape for the market will largely be remapped during the lockdown. Postmates and Uber Eats have slashed delivery prices and rolled out free delivery programs for certain affected customers, for example, which has the dual advantage of coming off as sensitive and helping the delivery leaders capture new customers.


How tech will change the way we work by 2030

#artificialintelligence

Technologies like Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning (ML) and Blockchain will have a significant impact on work in the next decade and beyond. But if you believe the sci-fi hype or get bogged down in the technology, it can be difficult to relate them to today's workplaces and jobs. Here are three everyday examples of their potential, expressed in terms of the business challenge they are addressing or how consumers will experience them. I don't mean to over simplify – these are powerful tools – but I think their potential shines through best when they're expressed in their simplest terms. What do you imagine the restaurant of the future to look like?


Marty the Robot Rolls out AI in the Supermarket - AI Trends

#artificialintelligence

When six-foot-four inch Marty first rolled into Stop & Shop, the robot walked into history. Social robot experts say it is among the first instance of a robot deployed in a customer environment, namely supermarkets in the Northeast. Marty rolls around the store looking for spills with its three cameras. It does take the place of the human worker, called an associate, that did the same thing, but it means the associate can do something else. Doing the walk-around of the store is seen as a mundane task.


EasyJet admits it was aware of 'highly sophisticated cyber attack' that affected 9 million customers as early as January

The Independent - Tech

Budget airline easyJet was aware of the data breach, which revealed personal information of nine million customers and the credit card information of over 2,200 customers, in January. News of the cyber attack broke yesterday, revealing that the attacker or attackers had access to the data of customers who booked flights from 17 October 2019 to 4 March 2020. In a statement, the airline said: "We're sorry that this has happened, and we would like to reassure customers that we take the safety and security of their information very seriously. "There is no evidence that any personal information of any nature has been misused." However, while there is no evidence the data was misused, that does not mean that it cannot be misused. Experts suggest that personal information "drives a higher price on the dark web" – the area of the internet inaccessible by mainstream search engines – and could be used for organised crime or ransomed. What does the easyJet data hack mean for you? What does the easyJet data hack mean for you? Two people with knowledge of the investigation have said that Chinese hackers are supposedly responsible for the hack based on similarities in hacking tools and techniques used in previous campaigns, but that has yet to be officially confirmed. In a statement, the Information Commissioners' Office (ICO) said: "We have a live investigation into the cyber attack involving easyJet.


What can your microwave tell you about your health?

#artificialintelligence

For many of us, our microwaves and dishwashers aren't the first thing that come to mind when trying to glean health information, beyond that we should (maybe) lay off the Hot Pockets and empty the dishes in a timely way. But we may soon be rethinking that, thanks to new research from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). The system, called "Sapple," analyzes in-home appliance usage to better understand our health patterns, using just radio signals and a smart electricity meter. Taking information from two in-home sensors, the new machine learning model examines use of everyday items like microwaves, stoves, and even hair dryers, and can detect where and when a particular appliance is being used. For example, for an elderly person living alone, learning appliance usage patterns could help their health-care professionals understand their ability to perform various activities of daily living, with the goal of eventually helping advise on healthy patterns.


40 Million New Reasons Why AI Continues to Drive Recruiting Technology

#artificialintelligence

If you're still wondering about the role that AI will play as recruiting technology evolves, there are about 40 million new reasons to believe it will continue to heavily influence the future. Paradox, a conversational AI platform, announced yesterday that it received $40 million in new funding. The company, whose clients include McDonald's, CVS, Unilever, and other large organizations, plans to "leverage the funding to expedite its vision of a future where AI is a liberating force to help people do their best work," according to the company's press release. As Paradox's founder and CEO Aaron Matos explains, "No one goes into recruiting or HR because they like screening resumes, scheduling interviews, or managing paperwork." Hence, the company is looking to advance efforts around using its AI assistant, Olivia, to relieve common administrative burdens.


From Disruption to Collision: The New Competitive Dynamics

#artificialintelligence

Members get 60 days free site access, $6.95/article thereafter. Airbnb is colliding with traditional hotel companies like Marriott International and Hilton. In just over a decade, the online lodging marketplace has assembled an inventory of more than 7 million rooms -- six times as much lodging capacity as Marriott managed to accumulate over 60-plus years. In terms of U.S. consumer spending, Airbnb overtook Hilton in 2018 and is on track to move ahead of Marriott.1 Although Airbnb serves similar consumer needs, it is a completely different kind of company.


Grab two Echo Show 5 smart displays for $90 at Amazon and Best Buy

Engadget

If you're just starting out with smart speakers or want multiple tech-savvy clocks around the house, this might be the deal you're looking for. You can buy two Echo Show 5 smart displays for the price of one at Amazon for $90 if you enter the code SHOW52PK at checkout. Best Buy is offering a similar deal if you add two of the screens to your cart. This is a daily deal at Best Buy, so you'll likely need to act quickly at both sites if you want to take advantage of the sale. A previous deal dropped the price of an individual unit down to $50, but this is a steeper overall discount if you're in the market for two.


Take a trip through Ancient Greece and Egypt with Assassin's Creed's free Discovery Tours

PCWorld

If you're hoping to emerge from your house in a few months with a thorough knowledge of Ancient Greek winemaking and Egyptian funeral rites, might I recommend Assassin's Creed's Discovery Tours? They're free on Ubisoft's website or Uplay (you'll need Uplay to run them) and are absolutely worth grabbing, for you or your kids. Strip out the stabbing, leave the rest. Origins and Odyssey are some of the most intricate digital dioramas ever created. Sure, there's a video game layered on top, but the real draw is the world Ubisoft's artists and animators and scripters created.