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ML and BI Are Coming Together, Gartner Says

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The convergence of machine learning and business intelligence is upon us, as BI tool makers increasingly are exposing ML capabilities to users, and users are performing ML activities in their BI tools. That's according to the latest Gartner report on analytics and BI tools, which was released this week. In its February 11 Magic Quadrant for Analytics and Business Intelligence (ABI) Platforms, the storied Stamford, Connecticut analyst firm did its best to quantify and qualify the trends in the sector. While BI and ML have largely existed on parallel tracks, with BI seeking to report what happened and ML seeking to predict what will happen, Gartner sees the two disciplines converging, at least as far as the toolsets are concerned. Not all ML work will occur within BI tools, of course.


As Robots Take Over Warehousing, Workers Pushed to Adapt

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Guess who's getting used to working with robots in their everyday lives? The very same warehouse workers once predicted to be losing their jobs to mechanical replacements. According to their makers, the machines should take on the most mundane and physically strenuous tasks. "They weigh a lot," Amazon worker Amanda Taillon said during the pre-Christmas rush at a company warehouse in Connecticut. Taillon's job is to enter a cage and tame Amazon's wheeled warehouse robots for long enough to pick up a fallen toy or relieve a traffic jam.


Get ready for the emergence of AI-as-a-Service

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Director of Data Science, CLARA analytics -- Ji Li has leadership responsibility for organizing and directing the CLARA data science team in building optimized machine learning solutions, creating artificial intelligence applications, and drivin… (show all) Ji Li has leadership responsibility for organizing and directing the CLARA data science team in building optimized machine learning solutions, creating artificial intelligence applications, and driving innovation. Dr. Li is well-published in fields related to computational theory and big data applications. His specific expertise and interests include machine learning, deep learning, text mining, and natural language processing and understanding. Dr. Li received his Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Connecticut.


As robots take over warehousing, workers pushed to adapt

#artificialintelligence

Guess who's getting used to working with robots in their everyday lives? The very same warehouse workers once predicted to be losing their jobs to mechanical replacements. According to their makers, the machines should take on the most mundane and physically strenuous tasks. "They weigh a lot," Amazon worker Amanda Taillon said during the pre-Christmas rush at a company warehouse in Connecticut. Taillon's job is to enter a cage and tame Amazon's wheeled warehouse robots for long enough to pick up a fallen toy or relieve a traffic jam.


Sproutt raises $12 million to find your best life insurance policy with AI

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Life insurance isn't as popular as it once was, despite the fact that a majority of people consider it to be important. Over 80% of consumers agreed in a recent survey that people need a life insurance policy, yet just 62% say they have one themselves. In fact, only 44% of U.S. households held individual life insurance as of 2010 -- a 50-year low -- compared with the 72% of Americans who owned life insurance in 1960. A New York- and Hartford, Connecticut-based startup hopes to reverse the trend with a novel service that rewards policyholders for making smart lifestyle choices. Dubbed Sproutt Insurance, it's the brainchild of insurance tech company Akitbo CEO Yoav Shaham, who nearly two years ago set out to blend analytics and health insights with AI to match people with life insurance providers.


Tesla on autopilot rear-ended Connecticut cop car as driver checked on dog: police

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 7 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com A Tesla on autopilot rear-ended a Connecticut trooper's vehicle early Saturday as the driver was checking on his dog in the back seat, state police said. Police said they had responded to a disabled vehicle that was stopped in the middle of Interstate 95. While waiting for a tow, the self-driving Tesla came down the road.


Travelers Announces Strategic Partnership With Groundspeed Analytics; Will Use AI to Streamline Submission and Quoting Processes

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HARTFORD, Conn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Travelers Companies, Inc. (NYSE: TRV) today announced a strategic partnership with Groundspeed Analytics, Inc. to simplify its new business and policy renewal processes through the use of artificial intelligence (AI). The two companies will also collaborate on the design of additional AI capabilities that can provide increased efficiencies through the automation of commercial insurance analytics. Quote requests often require manual effort to extract information from submitted documents before an underwriter can fully evaluate and price the risk. The use of AI will augment the company's underwriting capabilities by enhancing risk selection and increasing efficiency while also allowing agents and brokers to write business more quickly. "Using Groundspeed's AI capabilities will optimize productivity for both our underwriters and our agent and broker partners," said Bill Devine, Senior Vice President, Business Insurance, Travelers.


Bipartisan law would force Internet giants including Google and Facebook to reveal search algorithms

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Google, Facebook and other internet giants would disclose the algorithms they use to return search results under new legislation proposed by US law makers. The bipartisan Filter Bubble Transparency Act also would require the online companies to offer users an unfiltered search option that delivers results without any algorithmic tinkering. Senator John Thune, a Republican from North Dakota, filed the bill on Friday. The legislation was co-sponsored by Republican senators Jerry Moran of Kansas and Marsha blackburn of Tennessee, as well as Democrats Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut and Mark Warner of Virginia. Senator John Thune, a Republican from North Dakota, filed the bipartisan'Filter Bubble Transparency Act,' which would require internet companies to reveal algorithms used to determine online searches The online firm, owned by Alphabet, like other internet companies relies on algorithms - a highly-specific set of instructions to computers - that track users' behavior and location Thune says the legislation is needed because'people are increasingly impatient with the lack of transparency,' on the internet, reports the Wall Street Journal.


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Self Milking Cows - How Now, Cow? Dairy scientists use #robotics & cows to decide when to get milked. When ready, they walk into the milking stall, then the robotic arm attaches to begin milking.


Microsoft The Jackson Laboratory: Using AI to fight cancer

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Biomedical researchers are embracing artificial intelligence to accelerate the implementation of cancer treatments that target patients' specific genomic profiles, a type of precision medicine that in some cases is more effective than traditional chemotherapy and has fewer side effects. The potential for this new era of cancer treatment stems from advances in genome sequencing technology that enables researchers to more efficiently discover the specific genomic mutations that drive cancer, and an explosion of research on the development of new drugs that target those mutations. To harness this potential, researchers at The Jackson Laboratory, an independent, nonprofit biomedical research institution also known as JAX and headquartered in Bar Harbor, Maine, developed a tool to help the global medical and scientific communities stay on top of the continuously growing volume of data generated by advances in genomic research. The tool, called the Clinical Knowledgebase, or CKB, is a searchable database where subject matter experts store, sort and interpret complex genomic data to improve patient outcomes and share information about clinical trials and treatment options. The challenge is to find the most relevant cancer-related information from the 4,000 or so biomedical research papers published each day, according to Susan Mockus, the associate director of clinical genomic market development with JAX's genomic medicine institute in Farmington, Connecticut.