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Steve Blank Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning– Explained

#artificialintelligence

Hundreds of billions in public and private capital is being invested in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning companies. The number of patents filed in 2021 is more than 30 times higher than in 2015 as companies and countries across the world have realized that AI and Machine Learning will be a major disruptor and potentially change the balance of military power. Until recently, the hype exceeded reality. Today, however, advances in AI in several important areas (here, here, here, here and here) equal and even surpass human capabilities. If you haven't paid attention, now's the time. Artificial Intelligence and the Department of Defense (DoD) The Department of Defense has thought that Artificial Intelligence is such a foundational set of technologies that they started a dedicated organization- the JAIC – to enable and implement artificial intelligence across the Department. They provide the infrastructure, tools, and technical expertise for DoD users to successfully build and deploy their AI-accelerated projects. Some specific defense related AI applications are listed later in this document. We're in the Middle of a Revolution Imagine it's 1950, and you're a visitor who traveled back in time from today. Your job is to explain the impact computers will have on business, defense and society to people who are using manual calculators and slide rules. You succeed in convincing one company and a government to adopt computers and learn to code much faster than their competitors /adversaries. And they figure out how they could digitally enable their business – supply chain, customer interactions, etc. Think about the competitive edge they'd have by today in business or as a nation. That's where we are today with Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning. These technologies will transform businesses and government agencies.


Gen. Milley warns West Point graduates of 'increasing' risk of global war, 'robotic tanks'

FOX News

Gen. Mark Milley tells graduates of the US Military Academy to prepare West Point military academy graduates to prepare for increasingly dangerous world. Gen. Mark Milley told cadets graduating from U.S. Military Academy West Point Saturday to be prepared for increasing risk of global conflict and a host of new weapons technologies in their careers. "The world you are being commissioned into has the potential for a significant international conflict between great powers. And that potential is increasing, not decreasing," Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told the cadets at the 2022 commencement ceremony in West Point, New York. "And right now, at this very moment, a fundamental change is happening in the very character of war. We are facing right now two global powers, China and Russia, each with significant military capabilities, and both who fully intend to change the current rules based order," Milley said.


Addressing Labor Shortages with Automation

Communications of the ACM

U..S. employment statistics hit a new milestone last year, but not a positive one. In August 2021, almost 4.3 million workers quit their jobs, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. That's the highest number since the department began tracking voluntary resignations. Their reasons for leaving their jobs vary--the numbers track people who quit for a different position, as well as those who quit without having another job lined up. While the reasons for quitting vary, one thing is clear: Businesses are having a tough time getting employees to come back.


EEOC Issues Guidance On Artificial Intelligence And Americans With Disabilities Act Considerations

#artificialintelligence

On May 12, 2022, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) issued a "Technical Assistance" (TA) document addressing compliance with …


Artificial Intelligence (AI) Patent Filings Continue Explosive Growth Trend at the USPTO

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Ryan N. Phelan is a registered patent attorney who counsels and works with clients in all areas of intellectual property (IP), with a focus on patents. Clients enjoy Ryan's business-focused approach to IP. With a MBA from Northwestern's Kellogg School of Management, Ryan works with clients to achieve their business objectives, including developing and protecting their innovations and businesses with IP.


C3.ai Stock: Meteoric Growth With AI Tailwinds (NYSE:AI)

#artificialintelligence

C3.ai (NYSE:AI) is a leading software company, which provides Artificial Intelligence services to enterprises. The company is poised to ride the wave of growth forecasted for AI. The global Artificial Intelligence (AI) market is forecasted to grow at a meteoric 20.1% CAGR from $387 billion in 2022 to over $1.3 trillion by 2029. C3.ai serves an envious list of large reputable customers from The US Air Force and the Department of Defence, to large energy companies such as Shell & Engie. They have been growing revenues at a 40% CAGR over the past couple of years, while the stock price has declined massively.


How AI is transforming remote cardiac care for patients - MedCity News

#artificialintelligence

The pandemic accelerated the advancement of artificial intelligence (AI) in remote patient care. Physicians are increasingly using digital patient monitoring to better track health data, identify abnormalities, and provide patient-specific treatment -- all without the need for in-person interaction. Additionally, emergency departments are employing remote monitoring solutions to allow some patients to leave the hospital sooner. These transformative technologies are leading to better outcomes for patients and reduced healthcare costs. AI use cases continue to grow in healthcare, as constant learning and training of algorithms results in smarter technology as well as improved patient experiences. Most AI applications in healthcare use "augmented intelligence," which curates the algorithms' output to provide clinicians with direction on "where to look" when they get the analysis.


How the US plans to manage artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

US AI guidelines are everything the EU's AI Act is not: voluntary, non-prescriptive and focused on changing the culture of tech companies. As the EU's Artificial Intelligence (AI) Act fights its way through multiple rounds of revisions at the hands of MEPs, in the US a little-known organisation is quietly working up its own guidelines to help channel the development of such a promising and yet perilous technology. In March, the Maryland-based National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) released a first draft of its AI Risk Management Framework, which sets out a very different vision from the EU. The work is being led by Elham Tabassi, a computer vision researcher who joined the organisation just over 20 years ago. Then, "We built [AI] systems just because we could," she said.


How AI and automation play a role in ITOps

#artificialintelligence

In recent years, slews of tech professionals have turned their attention to AI, automation and cybersecurity and the benefits they can provide in the enterprise. At IBM's Think 2022 conference, a session titled "Rethinking ITOps with AI and automation" provided insight on the need for digital transformation and the role AI, automation and cybersecurity play in this effort to modernize IT operations. If organizations want to transform and scale to meet today's challenges, AI will need to play a key role in accelerating this, according to the speakers. AI not only automates repetitive tasks so human professionals can focus on innovation and moving forward, but the technology also mitigates contemporary global issues such as supply chain disruption. "I've seen a lot of organizations using AI technology for charting out the whole network of the ecosystem of the supply chain," said Ritu Jyoti, program vice president of AI strategies at IDC's software market research and advisory practice.


Tesla Autopilot under investigation following crash that killed three people

Engadget

A recent Model S crash that killed three people has sparked another Federal probe into Tesla's Autopilot system, The Wall Street Journal has reported. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is conducting the investigation and said it's currently looking into more than 30 incidents involving Tesla's Autopilot. The accident occurred on May 12th in Newport Beach's Mariners Mile strip, according to the Orange County Register. The EV reportedly struck a curb and ran into construction equipment, killing all three occupants. Three construction workers were also sent to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.