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Microsoft's Bing-ChatGPT Combo Can't Stand Up to Google's LaMDA

#artificialintelligence

Ever since rumours emerged that Microsoft might integrate GPT capabilities into Bing, Google HQ has been on Code Red status. Now, with the release of their earnings report for FY22, it seems that Alphabet has doubled down on their AI strategy for the coming year. Let's take a closer look at how Google did last year and what they have in store for the future. The headline statement of the earnings report was Sundar Pichai's remark on how AI has been reaching an'inflection point'. He went on to state that Google would soon unveil many'AI-driven leaps' in Search and many other applications.


Microsoft rolls out ChatGPT-powered Teams Premium - TechStory

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On Wednesday, ChatGPT announced a $20 per-month subscription plan, which will ensure subscribers receive access to quick responses and priority access to new features and updates. On Monday, Microsoft announced that it will be making OpenAI's ChatGPT available with its Azure OpenAI suite of services. As per an official announcement, enterprise customers who use Azure cloud services will also have access to ChatGPT through Azure OpenAI services and can apply for access to AI models including GPT-3.5, Codex, and DALL•E 2. In a tweet, Satya Nadella shared, "ChatGPT is coming soon to the Azure OpenAI Service, which is now generally available, as we help customers apply the world's most advanced AI models to their own business imperatives." Eric Boyd, Corporate Vice President, AI Platform at Microsoft in a blog shared that Azure OpenAI service is now generally available and will enable businesses to"apply for access to the most advanced AI models in the world--including GPT-3.5, Codex, and DALL•E 2--backed by the trusted enterprise-grade capabilities and AI-optimized infrastructure of Microsoft Azure, to create cutting-edge applications." Azure is also the core computing power behind OpenAI API's family of models for research advancement and developer productivity.


Infographic: There's a career for everyone at Microsoft – GeekWire

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That's at least according this neat infographic post that shows everything going on at Microsoft and how its products/services intertwine with each other. It appeared on the "Next at Microsoft" blog that's edited by Steve Clayton, who just appeared on our weekly podcast last month to talk about what he sees on the horizon in 2013 -- including natural user interfaces, machine learning, big data, 3D printing, and the rise of the "Internet of Things," blending the physical and digital worlds. Of course, Microsoft is facing increasingly tough competition for talent. It would be cool to see a similar infographic for the other big tech companies -- Amazon, Google, Apple, Facebook -- and compare it to Microsoft. Many believe Microsoft should not even be in the same conversation as the other four tech giants, while some think the Redmond software giant is turning into a sideshow.


How ChatGPT kicked off an AI arms race

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One day in mid-November, workers at OpenAI got an unexpected assignment: Release a chatbot, fast. The chatbot, an executive announced, would be known as "Chat with GPT-3.5," and it would be made available free to the public. The announcement confused some OpenAI employees. All year, the San Francisco artificial intelligence company had been working toward the release of GPT-4, a new AI model that was stunningly good at writing essays, solving complex coding problems and more. After months of testing and fine-tuning, GPT-4 was nearly ready.


From Meta to Microsoft, AI's big moment is here

The Japan Times

Big Tech companies have a new obsession: artificial intelligence. This week, chief executives across the sector packed earnings calls with mentions of the heavily hyped technology, which until recently existed more in the background than as a solid contributor to the bottom line. In conference calls after financial results, tech execs uttered the phrases "AI," "generative AI," or "machine learning" from two to six times as often as they did in the previous quarter, according to a review of conference transcripts. This could be due to a conflict with your ad-blocking or security software. Please add japantimes.co.jp and piano.io to your list of allowed sites.


ChatGPT Alternatives Rise Up, Including a Bot from China's Baidu - Grit Daily News

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The rise of ChatGPT and generative AI as a whole has been hard to miss in the past months, especially with Microsoft throwing its money behind OpenAI, the parent company of ChatGPT. However, with that attention has come a slew of ChatGPT alternatives, including a ChatGPT-style bot set to be launched in March by Baidu. According to Reuters, China's Baidu plans to launch an AI chatbot service in March similar to OpenAI's ChatGPT. While it will originally be launched as a standalone application, there are plans to integrate it into Baidu's search engine, much like what Microsoft is planning to do with OpenAI's technology and Bing. The goal is to incorporate the chatbot-generated results in search requests, providing more than links to users. Additionally, Baidu has unveiled AI-powered "creators," which can assume various roles, including: All of this comes as Baidu continues to invest heavily in AI tech, including cloud services, chips, and autonomous driving.


Analysis: From Meta to Microsoft, AI's big moment is here

#artificialintelligence

Feb 3 (Reuters) - Big Tech companies have a new obsession: artificial intelligence. This week, chief executives across the sector packed earnings calls with mentions of the heavily hyped technology, which until recently existed more in the background than as a solid contributor to the bottom line. In conference calls after financial results, tech execs uttered the phrases "AI," "generative AI," or "machine learning" from two to six times as often as they did in the previous quarter, according to a review of conference transcripts by Reuters. Executives from Microsoft Corp (MSFT.O) and Alphabet Inc (GOOGL.O), behind the latest big rivalry in tech, took their battle to the conference-call front lines. On Thursday, Alphabet appeared to edge out the competition.


Google is feeling the ChatGPT threat, and here's its response

ZDNet

As the world remains obsessed with ChatGPT, Google plans to offer the public access to its latest conversational AI and will next week reveal how AI will transform Search, Maps and other apps. Google CEO Sundar Pichai told investors this week that the company will let people "interact directly" with its newest and most powerful language models as a "companion to search". Here's one surprising way to tell the difference The company has reportedly been scrambling to put together a redesigned Search home page that includes multiple sections for back and forth questions between the user and a Google-made chatbot like ChatGPT, but combined with traditional search results. Google now appears ready to show off what it's been working on, though it remains to be seen whether it's "Apprentice Bard", the chatbot its been reportedly testing internally that uses Google's own LaMDA conversational chatbot technology. According to The Verge, Google has also sent media invites to an event on Wednesday, February 8 where it will explain how it's "using the power of AI to reimagine how people search for, explore and interact with information, making it more natural and intuitive than ever before to find what you need." The event will be streamed on YouTube at 8:30am ET.


Google poised to release chatbot technology after ChatGPT success

The Guardian

Google is to make its chatbot technology available to the public in "the coming weeks and months" as it responds to the success of ChatGPT, a Microsoft-backed artificial intelligence chatbot that has become a global phenomenon after it was made available free of charge. Sundar Pichai, the chief executive of Google's owner, Alphabet, said the use of AI had reached an "inflection point" and the company was "extremely well positioned" in the field. Pichai referred to two so-called large language models developed by the company, LaMDA and PaLM, with the former set to be released soon. This week CNBC reported that Google had begun testing an AI chatbot similar to ChatGPT called Apprentice Bard, which uses LaMDA technology. LaMDA shot to prominence last year when Google suspended and then dismissed an engineer after he went public with claims that LaMDA was "sentient".


Google's response to ChatGPT is on the way

ZDNet

As the world remains obsessed with ChatGPT, Google plans to offer the public access to its latest conversational AI and will next week reveal how AI will transform Search, Maps and other apps. Google CEO Sundar Pichai told investors this week that the company will let people "interact directly" with its newest and most powerful language models as a "companion to search". Also: What is ChatGPT and why does it matter? Here's everything you need to know The company has reportedly been scrambling to put together a redesigned Search home page that includes multiple sections for back and forth questions between the user and a Google-made chatbot like ChatGPT, but combined with traditional search results. Google now appears ready to show off what it's been working on, though it remains to be seen whether it's "Apprentice Bard", the chatbot its been reportedly testing internally that uses Google's own LaMDA conversational chatbot technology. According to The Verge, Google has also sent media invites to an event on Wednesday, February 8 where it will explain how it's "using the power of AI to reimagine how people search for, explore and interact with information, making it more natural and intuitive than ever before to find what you need."