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Symplectic ODE-Net: Learning Hamiltonian Dynamics with Control

arXiv.org Machine Learning

In this paper, we introduce Symplectic ODE-Net (SymODEN), a deep learning framework which can infer the dynamics of a physical system from observed state trajectories. To achieve better generalization with fewer training samples, SymODEN incorporates appropriate inductive bias by designing the associated computation graph in a physics-informed manner. In particular, we enforce Hamiltonian dynamics with control to learn the underlying dynamics in a transparent way which can then be leveraged to draw insight about relevant physical aspects of the system, such as mass and potential energy. In addition, we propose a parametrization which can enforce this Hamiltonian formalism even when the generalized coordinate data is embedded in a high-dimensional space or we can only access velocity data instead of generalized momentum. This framework, by offering interpretable, physically-consistent models for physical systems, opens up new possibilities for synthesizing model-based control strategies. In the recent years, deep neural networks (Goodfellow et al., 2016) have become very accurate and widely-used in many application domains, such as image recognition (He et al., 2016), language comprehension (Devlin et al., 2019), and sequential decision making (Silver et al., 2017). To learn underlying patterns from data and enable generalization beyond the training set, the learning approach incorporates appropriate inductive bias (Haussler, 1988; Baxter, 2000) by promoting representations which are simple in some sense. It typically manifests itself via a set of assumptions which in turn can guide a learning algorithm to pick one hypothesis over another. The success in predicting an outcome for previously unseen data then depends on how well the inductive bias captures the ground reality. Inductive bias can be introduced as the prior in a Bayesian model, or via the choice of computation graphs in a neural network.


Set Functions for Time Series

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Nevertheless, in many application domains, in particular healthcare (Y adav et al., 2018), measurements might not necessarily be observed at a regular rate or could be misaligned. Moreover, the presence or absence of a measurement and its observation frequency may carry information of its own (Little & Rubin, 2014), such that imputing the missing values is not always desired. While some algorithms can be readily applied to datasets with varying length, these methods usually assume regular sampling of the data and/or require the measurements across modalities to be aligned/synchronized, preventing their application to the aforementioned settings. Existing approaches for unaligned measurements, by contrast, typically rely on imputation to obtain a regularly-sampled version of a data set for classification. Learning a suitable imputation scheme, however, requires understanding the underlying dynamics of a system; this task is significantly more complicated and not necessarily required when classification is the main goal. Furthermore, even though a decoupled imputation scheme followed by classification is generally more scalable, it may lose information that is relevant for prediction tasks. Approaches that jointly optimize both tasks add a large computational overhead, thus suffering from poor scalability or high memory requirements. Our method is motivated by the understanding that, while RNNs and similar architectures are well suited for capturing and modelling the dynamics of a time series and thus excel at tasks such as forecasting, retaining the order of an input sequence can even be a disadvantage in classification scen-1 arXiv:1909.12064v1


Artificial Intelligence BlockCloud (AIBC) Technical Whitepaper

arXiv.org Machine Learning

The AIBC is an Artificial Intelligence and blockchain technology based large-scale decentralized ecosystem that allows system-wide low-cost sharing of computing and storage resources. The AIBC consists of four layers: a fundamental layer, a resource layer, an application layer, and an ecosystem layer. The AIBC implements a two-consensus scheme to enforce upper-layer economic policies and achieve fundamental layer performance and robustness: the DPoEV incentive consensus on the application and resource layers, and the DABFT distributed consensus on the fundamental layer. The DABFT uses deep learning techniques to predict and select the most suitable BFT algorithm in order to achieve the best balance of performance, robustness, and security. The DPoEV uses the knowledge map algorithm to accurately assess the economic value of digital assets.


B-Spline CNNs on Lie Groups

arXiv.org Machine Learning

A BSTRACT Group convolutional neural networks (G-CNNs) can be used to improve classical CNNs by equipping them with the geometric structure of groups. Central in the success of G-CNNs is the lifting of feature maps to higher dimensional disentangled representations, in which data characteristics are effectively learned, geometric data-augmentations are made obsolete, and predictable behavior under geometric transformations (equivariance) is guaranteed via group theory. Currently, however, the practical implementations of G-CNNs are limited to either discrete groups (that leave the grid intact) or continuous compact groups such as rotations (that enable the use of Fourier theory). In this paper we lift these limitations and propose a modular framework for the design and implementation of G-CNNs for arbitrary Lie groups . In our approach the differential structure of Lie groups is used to expand convolution kernels in a generic basis of B-splines that is defined on the Lie algebra. This leads to a flexible framework that enables localized, atrous, and deformable convolutions in G-CNNs by means of respectively localized, sparse and nonuniform B-spline expansions. The impact and potential of our approach is studied on two benchmark datasets: cancer detection in histopathology slides in which rotation equivariance plays a key role and facial landmark localization in which scale equivariance is important. In both cases, G-CNN architectures outperform their classical 2D counterparts and the added value of atrous and localized group convolutions is studied in detail. 1 I NTRODUCTION Group convolutional neural networks (G-CNNs) are as a class of neural networks that are equipped with the geometry of groups. This enables them to profit from the structure and symmetries in signal data such as images (Cohen & Welling, 2016). A key feature of G-CNNs is that they are equivariant with respect to transformations described by the group, i.e., they guarantee predictable behavior under such transformations and are insensitive to both local and global transformations on the input data. Classical CNNs are a special case of G-CNNs that are equivariant to translations and, in contrast to unconstrained NNs, they make advantage of (and preserve) the basic structure of signal data throughout the network (LeCun et al., 1990). Part of the success of G-CNNs can be attributed to the lifting of feature maps to higher dimensional objects that are generated by matching kernels under a range of poses (transformations in the group).


The Implicit Bias of Depth: How Incremental Learning Drives Generalization

arXiv.org Machine Learning

A leading hypothesis for the surprising generalization of neural networks is that the dynamics of gradient descent bias the model towards simple solutions, by searching through the solution space in an incremental order of complexity. We formally define the notion of incremental learning dynamics and derive the conditions on depth and initialization for which this phenomenon arises in deep linear models. Our main theoretical contribution is a dynamical depth separation result, proving that while shallow models can exhibit incremental learning dynamics, they require the initialization to be exponentially small for these dynamics to present themselves. However, once the model becomes deeper, the dependence becomes polynomial and incremental learning can arise in more natural settings. We complement our theoretical findings by experimenting with deep matrix sensing, quadratic neural networks and with binary classification using diagonal and convolutional linear networks, showing all of these models exhibit incremental learning.


Attributed Graph Learning with 2-D Graph Convolution

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Graph convolutional neural networks have demonstrated promising performance in attributed graph learning, thanks to the use of graph convolution that effectively combines graph structures and node features for learning node representations. However, one intrinsic limitation of the commonly adopted 1-D graph convolution is that it only exploits graph connectivity for feature smoothing, which may lead to inferior performance on sparse and noisy real-world attributed networks. To address this problem, we propose to explore relational information among node attributes to complement node relations for representation learning. In particular, we propose to use 2-D graph convolution to jointly model the two kinds of relations and develop a computationally efficient dimensionwise separable 2-D graph convolution (DSGC). Theoretically, we show that DSGC can reduce intra-class variance of node features on both the node dimension and the attribute dimension to facilitate learning. Empirically, we demonstrate that by incorporating attribute relations, DSGC achieves significant performance gain over state-of-the-art methods on node classification and clustering on several real-world attributed networks.


Deep Learning-based Polar Code Design

arXiv.org Machine Learning

In this work, we introduce a deep learning-based polar code construction algorithm. The core idea is to represent the information/frozen bit indices of a polar code as a binary vector which can be interpreted as trainable weights of a neural network (NN). For this, we demonstrate how this binary vector can be relaxed to a soft-valued vector, facilitating the learning process through gradient descent and enabling an efficient code construction. We further show how different polar code design constraints (e.g., code rate) can be taken into account by means of careful binary-to-soft and soft-to-binary conversions, along with rate-adjustment after each learning iteration. Besides its conceptual simplicity, this approach benefits from having the "decoder-in-the-loop", i.e., the nature of the decoder is inherently taken into consideration while learning (designing) the polar code. We show results for belief propagation (BP) decoding over both AWGN and Rayleigh fading channels with considerable performance gains over state-of-the-art construction schemes.


Towards Understanding the Transferability of Deep Representations

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Deep neural networks trained on a wide range of datasets demonstrate impressive transferability. Deep features appear general in that they are applicable to many datasets and tasks. Such property is in prevalent use in real-world applications. A neural network pretrained on large datasets, such as ImageNet, can significantly boost generalization and accelerate training if fine-tuned to a smaller target dataset. Despite its pervasiveness, few effort has been devoted to uncovering the reason of transferability in deep feature representations. This paper tries to understand transferability from the perspectives of improved generalization, optimization and the feasibility of transferability. We demonstrate that 1) Transferred models tend to find flatter minima, since their weight matrices stay close to the original flat region of pretrained parameters when transferred to a similar target dataset; 2) Transferred representations make the loss landscape more favorable with improved Lipschitzness, which accelerates and stabilizes training substantially. The improvement largely attributes to the fact that the principal component of gradient is suppressed in the pretrained parameters, thus stabilizing the magnitude of gradient in back-propagation. 3) The feasibility of transferability is related to the similarity of both input and label. And a surprising discovery is that the feasibility is also impacted by the training stages in that the transferability first increases during training, and then declines. We further provide a theoretical analysis to verify our observations.


Drawing early-bird tickets: Towards more efficient training of deep networks

arXiv.org Machine Learning

(Frankle & Carbin, 2019) shows that there exist winning tickets (small but critical subnetworks) for dense, randomly initialized networks, that can be trained alone to achieve comparable accuracies to the latter in a similar number of iterations. However, the identification of these winning tickets still requires the costly train-prune-retrain process, limiting their practical benefits. In this paper, we discover for the first time that the winning tickets can be identified at the very early training stage, which we term as early-bird (EB) tickets, via low-cost training schemes (e.g., early stopping and low-precision training) at large learning rates. Our finding of EB tickets is consistent with recently reported observations that the key connectivity patterns of neural networks emerge early. Furthermore, we propose a mask distance metric that can be used to identify EB tickets with low computational overhead, without needing to know the true winning tickets that emerge after the full training. Finally, we leverage the existence of EB tickets and the proposed mask distance to develop efficient training methods, which are achieved by first identifying EB tickets via low-cost schemes, and then continuing to train merely the EB tickets towards the target accuracy. Experiments based on various deep networks and datasets validate: 1) the existence of EB tickets, and the effectiveness of mask distance in efficiently identifying them; and 2) that the proposed efficient training via EB tickets can achieve up to 4.7x energy savings while maintaining comparable or even better accuracy, demonstrating a promising and easily adopted method for tackling cost-prohibitive deep network training.


Hyperspectral Image Classification With Context-Aware Dynamic Graph Convolutional Network

arXiv.org Machine Learning

In hyperspectral image (HSI) classification, spatial context has demonstrated its significance in achieving promising performance. However, conventional spatial context-based methods simply assume that spatially neighboring pixels should correspond to the same land-cover class, so they often fail to correctly discover the contextual relations among pixels in complex situations, and thus leading to imperfect classification results on some irregular or inhomogeneous regions such as class boundaries. To address this deficiency, we develop a new HSI classification method based on the recently proposed Graph Convolutional Network (GCN), as it can flexibly encode the relations among arbitrarily structured non-Euclidean data. Different from traditional GCN, there are two novel strategies adopted by our method to further exploit the contextual relations for accurate HSI classification. First, since the receptive field of traditional GCN is often limited to fairly small neighborhood, we proposed to capture long range contextual relations in HSI by performing successive graph convolutions on a learned region-induced graph which is transformed from the original 2D image grids. Second, we refine the graph edge weight and the connective relationships among image regions by learning the improved adjacency matrix and the 'edge filter', so that the graph can be gradually refined to adapt to the representations generated by each graph convolutional layer. Such updated graph will in turn result in accurate region representations, and vice versa. The experiments carried out on three real-world benchmark datasets demonstrate that the proposed method yields significant improvement in the classification performance when compared with some state-of-the-art approaches.