Computer Games


Games console: the indie designer pouring his grief into interactive art

The Guardian

Scrolling through Twitter on his phone before going to sleep on 22 May 2017, Dan Hett saw a few vague mentions of an accident of some sort in Manchester: "no details, no actual news, just busybodies speculating." He rubbed his eyes, removed his glasses and lay down without thinking about it any further. It wasn't until he picked up his phone the following morning and saw hundreds of notifications that he realised something real had happened, that there had been an explosion, and that his brother Martyn was missing. "The messages, the ones you read … they were right, and you went to sleep," said a voice in his head. "You went to fucking sleep."



The Annual Computer Poker Competition

AI Magazine

Now entering its eighth year, the Annual Computer Poker Competition (ACPC) is the premier event within the field of computer poker. With both academic and nonacademic competitors from around the world, the competition provides an open and international venue for benchmarking computer poker agents. We describe the competition's origins and evolution, current events, and winning techniques The competition has been held annually since 2006, open to all competitors, in conjunction with top-tier artificial intelligence conferences (AAAI and IJCAI). In 2006 the competition began with only 5 competitors. Since then, the total number of competitors has increased.


A Gamut of Games

AI Magazine

In 1950, Claude Shannon published his seminal work on how to program a computer to play chess. Since then, developing game-playing programs that can compete with (and even exceed) the abilities of the human world champions has been a long-sought-after goal of the AI research community. In Shannon's time, it would have seemed unlikely that only a scant 50 years would be needed to develop programs that play world-class backgammon, checkers, chess, Othello, and Scrabble. These remarkable achievements are the result of a better understanding of the problems being solved, major algorithmic insights, and tremendous advances in hardware technology. Computer games research is one of the important success stories of AI.


U.S. airport immigration computers go down for two hours amid year-end crush

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – Immigration desk computers at various airports went down for about two hours on Monday, causing long lines for travelers entering the United States after year-end holidays, according to Customs and Border Protection and posts on social media.


U.S. Airport Immigration Computers Go Down Temporarily: Agency

U.S. News

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Immigration desk computers at various airports went down for about two hours on Monday, causing long lines for travelers entering the United States after year-end holidays, according to Customs and Border Protection and posts on social media.



Microsoft Kinect Only Existed So That I Could Embarrassingly 'Just Dance'

#artificialintelligence

This makes sense as the technology has been utilized for innovations such as Cortana and Hololens. Microsoft will continue to support the device (the Kinect will still work with whatever Xbox you've got it plugged in to) because Microsoft knows that it would be a fatal error to take away my ability to Just Dance. The current high score on that track is 11,270, which belongs to my daughter, who beat me by 50 points. In fact, she recently took back the Just Dance crown on almost all our competitive tracks. Also see: 'Super Turrican: Directors Cut' Now Exists, Exclusively On The Analogue Super Nt I'm not sure which version of Just Dance "Pound the Alarm" is from.


Behold the Kickmen: how a game designer who hates football made the ultimate football sim

The Guardian

Dan Marshall insists there is no such thing as a football referee. "Umpires officiate over sport," he argues. There's a lot about football that annoys Marshall – he really doesn't get it. And yet this experienced game designer has just spent a year-and-a-half of his life creating a football simulation. Behold the Kickmen is in part a joke written in code, as well as a playful jibe at the predilection of football fans for taking the details of their adored sport too seriously.


China blocks online broadcast of computer go match

#artificialintelligence

Internet users outside China watched a computer defeat its national go champion, but few Chinese web surfers could see it. Censors blocked access to Tuesday's online broadcast by Google, which organized the game in a town west of Shanghai during a forum on artificial intelligence. The event got little coverage from Chinese newspapers and broadcasters, suggesting they might have received orders to avoid mentioning Google, which closed its China-based search engine in 2010 in a dispute over censorship and computer hacking. The official response to the game, a major event for go and artificial intelligence, reflects the conflict between the ruling Communist Party's technology ambitions and its insistence on controlling what its public can see, hear and read.