Workload Automation: 2018 Predictions From Gartner & EMA


As the amount of data that needs to be processed continues to increase, more and more IT teams are turning to cloud computing to help manage their large workloads. Workload Automation plays a vital role in managing virtual and cloud resources and can mean the difference between successful, cost-efficient cloud computing, and hidden-cost ridden operations. A Workload Automation solution that offers automated provisioning and deprovisioning of virtual and cloud-based resources, based on both historical and predictive analytics, can introduce a form of machine learning into your cloud environment and help you optimize your resource usage. The EMA Radar Report commends ActiveBatch Workload Automation on its standout cloud features, such as Smart Queue and Managed Queue, and its prebuilt integrations with VMware, Amazon EC2, Microsoft Azure, and System Center Virtual Machine Manger. The report states that these features and capabilities "make ActiveBatch a strong choice for anyone relying on hybrid or multi-cloud to optimize resource usage."

VMware kicks off international expansion of VMware Cloud on AWS


VMware said Wednesday that VMware Cloud on AWS is now available in the AWS London Region. The announcement marks the first global expansion of the hybrid cloud service since it was made available less than a year ago. VMware Cloud on AWS, which was previously available only in the AWS US West and East regions, runs VMware's enterprise class software-defined data center (SDDC) on the AWS cloud, allowing customers to run any application across public, private or hybrid cloud environments. The service is optimized to run on dedicated, bare metal AWS infrastructure. Wednesday's announcement also includes updates to VMware's cloud portfolio and partner network, along with the launch of a new cloud service that offers centralized log management.

Machine Learning Essentials - Level 2


Shivam Sharma works as a Subject Matter Expert at CloudThat Technologies and has been involved in various large and complex projects with global clients. He has experience in Machine Learning and Microsoft Infrastructure technology stack including Azure Stack, Office 365, EMS, Lync, Exchange, System Center, Windows Servers, designing Active Directory and managing various domain services, including Hyper-V virtualization. Having core training and consulting experience, he is passionate about technology and is involved in delivering training to corporate and individuals on cutting edge technologies. Arzan has 7 years of experience in Microsoft Infrastructure technology stack including setting up Windows servers, designing Active Directory and managing various domain services, including Hyper-V virtualization. As a Cloud Solutions Architect at CloudThat, he is responsible for deploying, supporting and managing client infrastructures on Azure.

How many servers do you need for your cloud? – DXC Blogs


As a company turning to public cloud, you are indeed replacing capital expenses (CAPEX) with operating expenses (OPEX), but that's not how it works for a public cloud company. Or, for that matter, your company if you're building your own private cloud. Even AWS, the biggest of the public clouds, can't do that. Over time, I hope AWS, or another of the other major public cloud powers share, if not their data, then at least their methodology.

Side of #Serverless BS with Your Hardware FUD @CloudExpo #SDN #AI #SDDC


Did You Want a Side of SLBS (Serverless BS) with Your Software or Hardware FUD? A few years ago a popular industry buzzword term theme included server less and hardware less. It turns out, serverless BS (SLBS) and hardware less are still trendy, and while some might view the cloud or software-defined data center (SDDC) virtualization, or IoT folks as the culprits, it is more widespread with plenty of bandwagon riders. To me what's ironic is that many purveyors of of SLBS also like to talk about hardware. What's the issue with SLBS?

VMwareVoice: 7 Keys To The Connected Car

Forbes Technology

As the Internet of Things (IoT) revs up the automotive industry, connected cars are becoming "devices on wheels" with in-vehicle systems connected to the Internet. Therefore, car manufacturers must develop new services and applications to provide consumers with more personalized driving options. Collecting and analyzing this data will help carmakers understand user preferences, develop new applications, and give consumers a wider, more personalized range of driving choices. To get new automotive IT services to market quickly, carmakers may wish to partner with application developers, IT security companies, and enterprise companies with established cloud-based infrastructures and data analysis experience.