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How Volkswagen's $50 Billion Plan to Beat Tesla Short-Circuited

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

The car, however, didn't work as advertised. It could drive, turn corners and stop on a dime. But the fancy technology features VW had promised were either absent or broken. The company's programmers hadn't yet figured out how to update the car's software remotely. Its futuristic head-up display that was supposed to flash speed, directions and other data onto the windshield didn't function.


This Week's Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through June 27)

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Amazon Shakes Up the Race for Self-Driving--and Ride-Hailing Aarian Marshal Wired "Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi says his company wants to be the'Amazon for transportation.' Friday, Amazon made clear that it intends to be the Amazon for transportation. The ecommerce giant said it had agreed to acquire Bay Area-based autonomous vehicle company Zoox, a deal reportedly worth more than $1 billion." Williams knew that he had not committed the crime in question. What he could not have known, as he sat in the interrogation room, is that his case may be the first known account of an American being wrongfully arrested based on a flawed match from a facial recognition algorithm, according to experts on technology and the law." Meet Silq: The First Intuitive Programming Language for Quantum Computers Luke Dormehl Digital Trends "The creation of the C programming language was a massive milestone for classical computing.


Central operating systems – what do they mean for driverless cars?

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Of course, operating systems have been present in cars for many years now, from the menus on the first digital stereos to the built-in in-car entertainment and satellite navigation systems that are offered as standard on almost every new car these days. However, these operating systems simply aren't future-proofed, and they don't manage the actual operation of the car itself – which we'll get onto later. Although there are already joint approaches between three (and more) of Germany's biggest automotive manufacturers to try and catch up with Tesla, there that BMW, Daimler and VW are working on a centralised operating system for driverless cars. So why is a collaborative operating system so important to the trio? In the next decade, there are two huge changes that automotive manufacturers face: the electrification of vehicles and the next level of autonomous driving that sees our control reduced either completely, or significantly.


Overview of Tools Supporting Planning for Automated Driving

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Planning is an essential topic in the realm of automated driving. Besides planning algorithms that are widely covered in the literature, planning requires different software tools for its development, validation, and execution. This paper presents a survey of such tools including map representations, communication, traffic rules, open-source planning stacks and middleware, simulation, and visualization tools as well as benchmarks. We start by defining the planning task and different supporting tools. Next, we provide a comprehensive review of state-of-the-art developments and analysis of relations among them. Finally, we discuss the current gaps and suggest future research directions.


The 84 biggest flops, fails, and dead dreams of the decade in tech

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The world never changes quite the way you expect. But at The Verge, we've had a front-row seat while technology has permeated every aspect of our lives over the past decade. Some of the resulting moments -- and gadgets -- arguably defined the decade and the world we live in now. But others we ate up with popcorn in hand, marveling at just how incredibly hard they flopped. This is the decade we learned that crowdfunded gadgets can be utter disasters, even if they don't outright steal your hard-earned cash. It's the decade of wearables, tablets, drones and burning batteries, and of ridiculous valuations for companies that were really good at hiding how little they actually had to offer. Here are 84 things that died hard, often hilariously, to bring us where we are today. Everyone was confused by Google's Nexus Q when it debuted in 2012, including The Verge -- which is probably why the bowling ball of a media streamer crashed and burned before it even came to market.



Tesla hires the creator of Apple's Swift programming language

Engadget

The fight between Apple and Tesla over engineering talent appears to be ongoing, with today's announcement that Chris Lattner is leaving Apple to join Tesla. Lattner was the Senior Director and Architect at Apple, where he created the open-source Swift programming language. At Tesla, he will be leading the Autopilot team that continues to develop its driver assistance and self-driving technology. News of Lattner's departure first surfaced via an email to the Swift Evolution mailing list, where he promised to "remain an active member of the Swift Core Team." The move is particularly notable not only because of Elon Musk's 2015 line that"If you don't make it at Tesla, you go work at Apple," but also those rumors about the direction of an autonomous car project within Apple.