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A Probabilistic Framework for Dynamic Object Recognition in 3D Environment With A Novel Continuous Ground Estimation Method

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In this thesis a probabilistic framework is developed and proposed for Dynamic Object Recognition in 3D Environments. A software package is developed using C++ and Python in ROS that performs the detection and tracking task. Furthermore, a novel Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) based method is developed to detect ground points in different urban scenarios of regular, sloped and rough. The ground surface behavior is assumed to only demonstrate local input-dependent smoothness. kernel's length-scales are obtained. Bayesian inference is implemented sing \textit{Maximum a Posteriori} criterion. The log-marginal likelihood function is assumed to be a multi-task objective function, to represent a whole-frame unbiased view of the ground at each frame because adjacent segments may not have similar ground structure in an uneven scene while having shared hyper-parameter values. Simulation results shows the effectiveness of the proposed method in uneven and rough scenes which outperforms similar Gaussian process based ground segmentation methods.


Artificial Intellgence -- Application in Life Sciences and Beyond. The Upper Rhine Artificial Intelligence Symposium UR-AI 2021

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The TriRhenaTech alliance presents the accepted papers of the 'Upper-Rhine Artificial Intelligence Symposium' held on October 27th 2021 in Kaiserslautern, Germany. Topics of the conference are applications of Artificial Intellgence in life sciences, intelligent systems, industry 4.0, mobility and others. The TriRhenaTech alliance is a network of universities in the Upper-Rhine Trinational Metropolitan Region comprising of the German universities of applied sciences in Furtwangen, Kaiserslautern, Karlsruhe, Offenburg and Trier, the Baden-Wuerttemberg Cooperative State University Loerrach, the French university network Alsace Tech (comprised of 14 'grandes \'ecoles' in the fields of engineering, architecture and management) and the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland. The alliance's common goal is to reinforce the transfer of knowledge, research, and technology, as well as the cross-border mobility of students.


How Volkswagen's $50 Billion Plan to Beat Tesla Short-Circuited

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

The car, however, didn't work as advertised. It could drive, turn corners and stop on a dime. But the fancy technology features VW had promised were either absent or broken. The company's programmers hadn't yet figured out how to update the car's software remotely. Its futuristic head-up display that was supposed to flash speed, directions and other data onto the windshield didn't function.


Central operating systems – what do they mean for driverless cars?

#artificialintelligence

Of course, operating systems have been present in cars for many years now, from the menus on the first digital stereos to the built-in in-car entertainment and satellite navigation systems that are offered as standard on almost every new car these days. However, these operating systems simply aren't future-proofed, and they don't manage the actual operation of the car itself – which we'll get onto later. Although there are already joint approaches between three (and more) of Germany's biggest automotive manufacturers to try and catch up with Tesla, there that BMW, Daimler and VW are working on a centralised operating system for driverless cars. So why is a collaborative operating system so important to the trio? In the next decade, there are two huge changes that automotive manufacturers face: the electrification of vehicles and the next level of autonomous driving that sees our control reduced either completely, or significantly.


The 84 biggest flops, fails, and dead dreams of the decade in tech

#artificialintelligence

The world never changes quite the way you expect. But at The Verge, we've had a front-row seat while technology has permeated every aspect of our lives over the past decade. Some of the resulting moments -- and gadgets -- arguably defined the decade and the world we live in now. But others we ate up with popcorn in hand, marveling at just how incredibly hard they flopped. This is the decade we learned that crowdfunded gadgets can be utter disasters, even if they don't outright steal your hard-earned cash. It's the decade of wearables, tablets, drones and burning batteries, and of ridiculous valuations for companies that were really good at hiding how little they actually had to offer. Here are 84 things that died hard, often hilariously, to bring us where we are today. Everyone was confused by Google's Nexus Q when it debuted in 2012, including The Verge -- which is probably why the bowling ball of a media streamer crashed and burned before it even came to market.



Elon Musk: $35,000 Tesla Model 3 arrives but job cuts coming as sales shift online

ZDNet

Tesla's long-awaited $35,000 Model 3 electric car is finally available to buy, just under three years after hundreds of thousands of people started placing deposits for pre-order vehicles. The standard Model 3 has a range of 220 miles and its single electric motor is capable of 0-60mph in 5.6 seconds with a top speed of 130mph. The standard interior includes heated cloth seats, manual seat and steering adjustment, basic audio, standard maps and navigation, and a center console with storage and four USB ports. Tesla has also announced a Standard Range Plus model, which has a 240-mile range with a top speed of 140mph and can do 0-60mph in 5.3 seconds. Along with the Model 3 announcement, Tesla said it will also close most of its showrooms around the world and shift sales to online only.


It's a Linux-powered car world

ZDNet

Elon Musk's new tractor trailer can handle most US shipping routes on a single charge. Linux is everywhere including your car. While some companies, like Tesla, run their own homebrew Linux distros, most rely on Automotive Grade Linux (AGL). AGL is a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open platform for connected cars with over 140 members. This Linux Foundation-based organization is a who's who of Linux-friendly car manufacturers.


Linux is under your hood

ZDNet

Elon Musk's new tractor trailer can handle most US shipping routes on a single charge. Way back in 2004, Jonathan Schwartz, then Sun's chief operating officer, suggested that cars could become software platforms the same way feature phones were. But, it's Linux, not Java, which is making the most of "smart cars". That's because Linux and open-source software are flexible enough to bring a complete software stack to any hardware, be it supercomputer, smartphone, or a car. There are other contenders, such as Blackberry's QNX and Microsoft IoT Connected Vehicles, but both have lost ground to Linux.


Ford Paves a Path From Big Automaker to Big Operating System

WIRED

In its 114-year history, Ford has been many kinds of automaker. Now the company that helped put a car (or two) in every garage wants to be something else altogether: an operating system.