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How Volkswagen's $50 Billion Plan to Beat Tesla Short-Circuited

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

The car, however, didn't work as advertised. It could drive, turn corners and stop on a dime. But the fancy technology features VW had promised were either absent or broken. The company's programmers hadn't yet figured out how to update the car's software remotely. Its futuristic head-up display that was supposed to flash speed, directions and other data onto the windshield didn't function.


Central operating systems – what do they mean for driverless cars?

#artificialintelligence

Of course, operating systems have been present in cars for many years now, from the menus on the first digital stereos to the built-in in-car entertainment and satellite navigation systems that are offered as standard on almost every new car these days. However, these operating systems simply aren't future-proofed, and they don't manage the actual operation of the car itself – which we'll get onto later. Although there are already joint approaches between three (and more) of Germany's biggest automotive manufacturers to try and catch up with Tesla, there that BMW, Daimler and VW are working on a centralised operating system for driverless cars. So why is a collaborative operating system so important to the trio? In the next decade, there are two huge changes that automotive manufacturers face: the electrification of vehicles and the next level of autonomous driving that sees our control reduced either completely, or significantly.


The 84 biggest flops, fails, and dead dreams of the decade in tech

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The world never changes quite the way you expect. But at The Verge, we've had a front-row seat while technology has permeated every aspect of our lives over the past decade. Some of the resulting moments -- and gadgets -- arguably defined the decade and the world we live in now. But others we ate up with popcorn in hand, marveling at just how incredibly hard they flopped. This is the decade we learned that crowdfunded gadgets can be utter disasters, even if they don't outright steal your hard-earned cash. It's the decade of wearables, tablets, drones and burning batteries, and of ridiculous valuations for companies that were really good at hiding how little they actually had to offer. Here are 84 things that died hard, often hilariously, to bring us where we are today. Everyone was confused by Google's Nexus Q when it debuted in 2012, including The Verge -- which is probably why the bowling ball of a media streamer crashed and burned before it even came to market.


Apple iTunes could be killed off as software update rumoured to bring host of new apps

The Independent - Tech

The music management system was once seen as the future of computing: it was used to control the iPod, and was home to the iTunes Store, both of which helped to revolutionise the way people buy and listen to music. But with time it has become bloated with additional features – from watching films to managing devices like phones – and its performance has dropped. That has led to it becoming largely despised within the tech community. We'll tell you what's true. You can form your own view.


Tesla will open its security code to other car manufacturers

Engadget

Tesla might just get into the habit of releasing source code for its in-car tech. Elon Musk has signaled his intention to post the source code for Tesla's car security software, letting any automaker roll it into their own machines. It would be "extremely important" to ensure the safety of future self-driving cars, he argued, and that's not without merit. You really don't want intruders crashing your car or otherwise causing havoc, especially when you're not at the wheel. Musk didn't provide a timeline for availability, and you might not want to get your hopes up when it took years for Tesla just to post any source code.


Kodi: TVAddons library mysteriously shuts down with no warning to users

The Independent - Tech

TVAddons, widely considered the number one library for Kodi add-ons, has mysteriously gone offline. The site shut down last week, without explanation, and hasn't returned. Its Facebook page has also disappeared. TVAddons hosted Exodus, and there are fears that it could stop working in the future. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph.