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Machine Learning in IoT Security: Current Solutions and Future Challenges

arXiv.org Machine Learning

The future Internet of Things (IoT) will have a deep economical, commercial and social impact on our lives. The participating nodes in IoT networks are usually resource-constrained, which makes them luring targets for cyber attacks. In this regard, extensive efforts have been made to address the security and privacy issues in IoT networks primarily through traditional cryptographic approaches. However, the unique characteristics of IoT nodes render the existing solutions insufficient to encompass the entire security spectrum of the IoT networks. This is, at least in part, because of the resource constraints, heterogeneity, massive real-time data generated by the IoT devices, and the extensively dynamic behavior of the networks. Therefore, Machine Learning (ML) and Deep Learning (DL) techniques, which are able to provide embedded intelligence in the IoT devices and networks, are leveraged to cope with different security problems. In this paper, we systematically review the security requirements, attack vectors, and the current security solutions for the IoT networks. We then shed light on the gaps in these security solutions that call for ML and DL approaches. We also discuss in detail the existing ML and DL solutions for addressing different security problems in IoT networks. At last, based on the detailed investigation of the existing solutions in the literature, we discuss the future research directions for ML- and DL-based IoT security.


Intelligent Connectivity: the Fusion of 5G, AI and IoT Internet of Things

#artificialintelligence

Intelligent connectivity is the combination of high-speed, low-latency 5G networks, cutting-edge artificial intelligence (AI) and the linking of billions of devices through the Internet of Things (IoT). As these three revolutionary technologies combine they will enable transformational new capabilities in transport, entertainment, industry and public services, and much more beyond. As operators expand beyond provision largely of network access to facilitation of holistic services, they are rapidly bringing into view a world of technological ease and sophistication which not long ago still seemed a long way off. The GSMA estimates that, by 2025, there will be 25 billion connected devices. This hyperconnectivity will be enabled by undisturbed mobile broadband, which will make the number of connected devices communicating with one other will be virtually limitless.