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Study examines robotic exoskeletons and bodily fit

#artificialintelligence

A shoddily tailored suit or a shrunken T-shirt may not be the most stylish, but wearing them is unlikely to hurt more than your reputation. An ill-fitting robotic exoskeleton on the battlefield or factory floor, however, could be a much bigger problem than a fashion faux pas. Exoskeletons, many of which are powered by springs or motors, can cause pain or injury if their joints are not aligned with the user's. To help manufacturers and consumers mitigate these risks, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed a new measurement method to test whether an exoskeleton and the person wearing it are moving smoothly and in harmony. In a new report, the researchers describe an optical tracking system (OTS) not unlike the motion capture techniques used by filmmakers to bring computer-generated characters to life.


US Marines to get 'Alpha' exoskeleton for super strength

#artificialintelligence

The Marines are about to get their hands on an impressive bit of hardware: A wearable robotic exoskeleton that gives users super strength. The company delivering the unit, a defense-focused subsidiary of Sarcos Robotics developed the exoskeleton for industrial uses, including in energy and construction. An executive guide to the technology and market drivers behind the $135 billion robotics market. Still, in many ways, this is a return to roots for Sarcos. In 2000, the company was part of a storied class of DARPA grant recipients working on powered exoskeletons for defense purposes.


A robotic exoskeleton for paraplegics – IAM Network

#artificialintelligence

Combining robotics with artificial intelligence (AI), an Indian health tech startup has developed an exoskeleton used as a robotic arm/leg for paraplegic patients.Arguably the first in the country, the indigenously designed device could be a potential alternative to the expensive products sourced from abroad.The startup, GenElek Technologies, was chosen to represent India at the Powered Exoskeleton Race at Cybathlon 2020 in Zurich before the Covid-19 outbreak forced a reschedule. Two former Indian Army paraplegic soldiers from the Paraplegic Rehabilitation Centre (PRC), Mohali, were to wear the robotic gear and compete with 17 other international teams.Exoskeletons (externally worn robotic support system) make it possible for people with neurological conditions such as paralysis, stroke and spinal cord injury to walk or move better. GenElek's model was to customise its design and tailor it to individual needs, the startup's founder John Ignatius Kujur told DH.So, how does it incorporate artificial intelligence? The data is collected in real time, interpreted and relayed by AI to the cloud. It gets processed in real time by a medical expert monitoring the patient's treatment.Not for amputeesThe device is not for amputees, John explained.


Cyborg construction workers and the quest for efficiency

ZDNet

One of the most interesting technology stories of the past few years has centered on a decidedly legacy industry: Construction. There's increasing competition between technology developers to bring new efficiencies to the job site, and it's coming from firms working in areas like robotics and artificial intelligence. I was reminded of this when I learned that a company called Buildots is pulling down $16M for their AI construction solution which is based around hardhat-mounted 360 cameras. That's a relatively benign tech upgrade, perhaps, but it's part of a larger trend: Much of the tech development in construction is focused on augmenting humans with technology, pointing to a future of hybrid man-machine workers. Some of the more eye-catching technologies coming online now include wearable robots.


U.S. Marines to get "Alpha" exoskeleton for super strength

ZDNet

The Marines are about to get their hands on an impressive bit of hardware: a wearable robotic exoskeleton that gives users super strength. The company delivering the unit, a defense-focused subsidiary of Sarcos Robotics developed the exoskeleton for industrial uses, including in energy and construction. Still, in many ways this is a return to roots for Sarcos. In 2000, the company was part of a storied class of DARPA grant recipients working on powered exoskeletons for defense purposes. In many ways the XO, which conserves energy by remaining passive when not actuated, is the fulfillment of that research.


Researchers Augment Robotic Prosthetics With AI and Computer Vision – IAM Network

#artificialintelligence

The AI in robotic prostheses predicts the type of terrain users will be stepping on, quantifies the uncertainties associated with that prediction, and then incorporates that uncertainty into its decision-making. Researchers at North Carolina State University have integrated computer vision and artificial intelligence into off-the-shelf robotic prosthetics to improve walking on different types of terrain. The team built a device that attaches to the prosthetic limb to track movement and recognize different terrains. The AI is able to recognize six different terrains: downstairs, upstairs, cement, grass, tile, and concrete. "Lower-limb robotic prosthetics need to execute different behaviors based on the terrain users are walking on," said Edgar Lobaton, associate professor of computer engineering at North Carolina State University.


ServiceNow BrandVoice: AI Is The Brain's Exoskeleton

#artificialintelligence

But we humans are still smarter. We are now at a point with artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) where we can use a new confluence of forces to increase human productivity and ingenuity. All the while, we must remember why we're using these new tools and how they can help us work smarter and faster. If you saw the movie Aliens, you might remember the iconic image of Ripley encased in a mechanical exoskeleton, ready to take on the deadly alien queen. AI's impact on human intelligence is akin to a mechanical exoskeleton on the human body.


ServiceNow BrandVoice: AI Is The Brain's Exoskeleton

#artificialintelligence

But we humans are still smarter. We are now at a point with artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) where we can use a new confluence of forces to increase human productivity and ingenuity. All the while, we must remember why we're using these new tools and how they can help us work smarter and faster. If you saw the movie Aliens, you might remember the iconic image of Ripley encased in a mechanical exoskeleton, ready to take on the deadly alien queen. AI's impact on human intelligence is akin to a mechanical exoskeleton on the human body.


Researchers incorporate computer vision and uncertainty into AI for robotic prosthetics

#artificialintelligence

Researchers have developed new software that can be integrated with existing hardware to enable people using robotic prosthetics or exoskeletons to walk in a safer, more natural manner on different types of terrain. The new framework incorporates computer vision into prosthetic leg control, and includes robust artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms that allow the software to better account for uncertainty. "Lower-limb robotic prosthetics need to execute different behaviors based on the terrain users are walking on," says Edgar Lobaton, co-author of a paper on the work and an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at North Carolina State University. "The framework we've created allows the AI in robotic prostheses to predict the type of terrain users will be stepping on, quantify the uncertainties associated with that prediction, and then incorporate that uncertainty into its decision-making." The researchers focused on distinguishing between six different terrains that require adjustments in a robotic prosthetic's behavior: tile, brick, concrete, grass, "upstairs" and "downstairs."


Chinese man makes own prosthetic limbs

Al Jazeera

Sun Jifa is a Chinese veteran who has created his own bionic arms and is now helping other amputees in his country. At age 27, Sun lost his hands in a fishing-related explosion. Unfortunately, he soon realised he could not afford the prosthetic hands recommended by the local hospital. After eight years of creating prototypes, he says he finally developed a working model that would allow him to grip, hold, and mimic other necessary movements via a system of pulleys and wires. "Up to now, my artificial limbs are beautiful and can be designed with the help of the disabled person's own motivation," Sun explains.