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Telerobotic System Helps Surgeons Remotely Treat Strokes

#artificialintelligence

A new telerobotic system developed by engineers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) enables surgeons to remotely treat patients suffering from a stroke or aneurysm. The system utilizes a joystick that the surgeons can use in a hospital to control a robotic arm at another location. This enables them to operate on patients during the critical time window needed to preserve brain function and save lives.


Joystick-operated robot could help surgeons treat stroke remotely

#artificialintelligence

MIT engineers have developed a telerobotic system to help surgeons quickly and remotely treat patients experiencing a stroke or aneurysm. With a modified joystick, surgeons in one hospital may control a robotic arm at another location to safely operate on a patient during a critical window of time that could save the patient's life and preserve their brain function. The robotic system, whose movement is controlled through magnets, is designed to remotely assist in endovascular intervention -- a procedure performed in emergency situations to treat strokes caused by a blood clot. Such interventions normally require a surgeon to manually guide a thin wire to the clot, where it can physically clear the blockage or deliver drugs to break it up. One limitation of such procedures is accessibility: Neurovascular surgeons are often based at major medical institutions that are difficult to reach for patients in remote areas, particularly during the "golden hour" -- the critical period after a stroke's onset, during which treatment should be administered to minimize any damage to the brain.


MIT's surgical robot could help surgeons treat strokes remotely

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Robotic surgery is finally taking shape in healthcare. Advances in robotics technology have been adapted in various subspecialties of both open and minimally invasive surgery, offering benefits such as enhanced surgical precision and accuracy with reduced fatigue of the surgeon. MIT engineers have developed a telerobotic system to help surgeons quickly and remotely treat patients experiencing a stroke or aneurysm. With a joystick, surgeons in a hospital can control a robotic arm at another location to safely operate during a critical window of time that could save the patient's life and preserve their brain function. The new system consists of a medical-grade robotic arm with a magnet attached to its wrist and sits beside the patient's head as they lie on an operating table at their local hospital.


The Morning After: MIT engineers' stroke-surgery robot

Engadget

Don't worry, yes, there are even more Musk machinations, but first let's broach something a little different -- and possibly lifesaving. A team of MIT engineers is developing a telerobotic system for neurosurgeons. It unveiled a robotic arm that doctors can control remotely using a modified joystick to treat stroke patients. The arm has a magnet attached to its wrist, and surgeons can adjust its orientation to guide a magnetic wire through the patient's arteries and vessels to remove blood clots in the brain. Like in-person procedures, surgeons will have to rely on live imaging to get to the blood clot, but the machine means they don't have to be physically with the patient.


Automata expands its lab automation ambitions with $50M B round – TechCrunch

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The world's labs are under pressure to do more tests and process more materials, not just due to COVID but from the growing biotech and drug development sectors -- and automation is the sure path forward. Automata, which got its start making a robotic arm for handling individual tasks, has now raised $50 million to automate entire lab processes from start to finish. When we last talked with Automata in 2019, the company had just raised a $7.4 million A round and was focusing on developing and deploying its Eva robotic arm, which could be used for a variety of common tasks: moving glass around, performing simple samples, that sort of thing. But they soon found that life as a robot provider for small, highly individual projects and labs wasn't a viable business model. "It's not enough to engage with your customer at one stage -- like, 'here's the most affordable robot arm on the market, good luck!' If companies buy one or two robots, it optimizes a few processes but it doesn't revolutionize how that company works. So over the last few years we've started looking at how we can drive adoption of our tech at a scale that matters," said co-founder and CEO Mostafa ElSayed.


Automata expands its lab automation ambitions with $40M B round – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

The world's labs are under pressure to do more tests and process more materials, not just due to COVID but from the growing biotech and drug development sectors -- and automation is the sure path forwards. Automata, which got its start making a robotic arm for handling individual tasks, has now raised $40M to automate entire lab processes from start to finish. When we last talked with Automata in 2019, the company had just raised a $7.4M A round and was focusing on developing and deploying its Eva robotic arm, which could be used for a variety of common tasks: moving glass around, performing simple samples, that sort of thing. But they soon found that life as a robot provider for small, highly individual projects and labs wasn't a viable business model. "It's not enough to engage with your customer at one stage -- like, 'here's the most affordable robot arm on the market, good luck!' If companies buy one or two robots, it optimizes a few processes but it doesn't revolutionize how that company works. So over the last few years we've started looking at how we can drive adoption of our tech at a scale that matters," said co-founder and CEO Mostafa ElSayed.


Novel wearable armband helps users of prosthetic hands to 'get a grip': Researchers design first-of-its-kind multichannel soft robotic armband that conveys artificial sensations of touch

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A first-of-its-kind study using haptic/touch sensation feedback, electromyogram (EMG) control and an innovative wearable soft robotic armband could just be a game changer for users of prosthetic hands who have long awaited advances in dexterity. Findings from the study could catalyze a paradigm shift in the way current and future artificial hands are controlled by limb-absent people. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University's College of Engineering and Computer Science in collaboration with FAU's Charles E. Schmidt College of Science investigated whether people could precisely control the grip forces applied to two different objects grasped simultaneously with a dexterous artificial hand. For the study, they also explored the role that visual feedback played in this complex multitasking model by systematically blocking visual and haptic feedback in the experimental design. In addition, they studied the potential for time saving in a simultaneous object transportation experiment compared to a one-at-a-time approach.


Robot surgery used on throat tumours for first time in Scotland

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A security guard has become one of the first patients in Scotland to have a tumour cut out of his throat by a robot. Peter Simpson was awake, talking and eating ice-cream just five hours after his tonsil and part of his tongue were removed. The 63-year-old was home within 24 hours of the pioneering surgery at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in his home city of Glasgow. "I'm feeling good and I'm really quite surprised," he told STV News after the procedure, which our cameras were allowed to film. "When you're told you're getting this kind of operation on your throat, you think'am I going to be able to talk or eat?', but I can do everything. "There is some discomfort when I swallow but it's much better than I expected." Peter was shaving while on holiday in Skye last August when he noticed a lump on his neck, which turned out to be cancerous. Tumours in such hard-to-reach areas would previously have involved a gruelling and invasive operation. But medics were instead able to guide robotic arms – already used in urology and lung surgery – into Peter's mouth. Ahead of the treatment, staff in the operating theatre told STV News it was a "big week" for them after six months of extensive Transoral Robotic surgery (TORS) training. A doctor from London's Royal Marsden hospital was there to advise as the first of five such ENT (ear, nose and throat) procedures planned in Scotland took place. Jenny Montgomery, consultant for head and neck surgery, guided the robotic arm and communicated by microphone with a surgical team working on Peter. The'arms' of the robot allowed the team to make tiny movements, while the hands can rotate 360 degrees. Enhanced precision helps reduce side effects and the length of time patients have to stay in hospital. "This patient will have probably a more effective identification of where their cancer originated from than they would have had with previous operations," said Ms Montgomery. "If it's a small cancer, there is a possibility they might not need radiotherapy.


BMW, IKEA Using AI-Powered Exoskeleton That Adds 66 Pounds Of Lift Force

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German Bionic just released the fifth generation Cray X AI-enhanced power suit, or exoskeleton, to help those billions of people with almost 70 pounds of additional lifting capacity, reducing the risk of back injury and repetitive stress injuries. The Cray X is already in use at BMW, IKEA, and the French delivery service DPD, and will be launched internationally in January 2022. The AI-powered suit boosts productivity, reduces error rates, decreases accidents, and results in a 25% reduction in the number of sick days workers take, German Bionic says. The smart exoskeleton market has been estimated to be growing 41.3% a year to a nearly $2 billion industry by 2025, with applications in construction, shipping and receiving, healthcare, and the military. German Bionic CEO Armin Schmidt thinks that within five years this kind of smart exoskeleton capability could help the injured, aged, and disabled to walk, run, or even play sports.


German Bionic's connected exoskeleton helps workers lift smarter

Engadget

We're still quite a ways away from wielding proper Power Loaders but advances in exosuit technology are rapidly changing how people perform physical tasks in their daily lives -- some designed to help rehabilitate spinal injury patients, others created to improve a Marine's warfighting capabilities, and many built simply to make physically repetitive vocations less stressful for the people performing them. But German Bionic claims only one of them is intelligent enough to learn from its users' mistaken movements: its 5th-generation Cray X. The Cray X fits on workers like a 7kg backpack with hip-mounted actuators that move carbon fiber linkages strapped to the upper legs, allowing a person to easily lift and walk with up to 30kg (66 lbs) with both their legs and backs fully supported. Though it doesn't actively assist the person's shoulders and arms with the task, the Cray X does offer a Smart Safety Companion system to help mitigate common lifting injuries. "It's a real time software application that runs in the background and can warn the worker when the ergonomic risk is getting too high," Norma Steller, German Bionic's Head of IoT, told Engadget.