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5 killer Radeon GPU features that level up your gaming experience

PCWorld

Today's GPUs are so capable you might not even consider that off-the-shelf you could be leaving performance on the table. Indeed, if you thought you were "locked in" to the performance limits of your Radeon GPU at the time of purchase, know this: You can "unlock" more performance and even more eye-candy to bring your graphics to another level. We'll show you how free, easy, and fun it is to "boost" your GPU! (To learn more about today's graphics hardware, see our roundup of the best GPUs for PC gaming.) Like the name implies, Radeon Boost is a variation on the resolution-altering tools that increase GPU performance intelligently. It will take its cues from movement on the screen, as opposed to a traditional frames-per-second metric.


AMD sees another six months of video game chip shortages

ZDNet

The world's hunger for graphics chips for PCs and gaming consoles means there will be short supply in many markets through the first half of this year, according to chip titan Advanced Micro Devices. "We did have some supply constraints as we ended the year," said CEO Lisa Su on a conference call with analysts Tuesday evening following the company's report of stronger-than-expected Q4 results. Shortages of supply "were primarily, I would say, in the PC market, the low end of the PC market and in the gaming markets," said Su. "That being said, I think we're getting great support from our manufacturing partners. The industry does need to increase the overall capacity levels. And so we do see some tightness through the first half of the year." AMD's Radeon RX 6900 XT graphics card, introduced last quarter.


I played Shadow of the Tomb Raider over 5G, and it didn't suck

PCWorld

Anyone who's experimented with a cloud gaming service knows that wired ethernet is almost required. At AT&T's Spark conference in San Francisco on Monday, I had a chance to try out Nvidia's GeForce Now service for PCs running over AT&T's 5G service, playing the newly-released Shadow of the Tomb Raider game on a generic Lenovo ThinkPad. The traditional way to run a PC game is locally, running the game off a hard drive or SSD on your PC, using the CPU and GPU to render the game as fast as it can. The downside, of course, is that you have to buy all of that hardware yourself. The trade-off is that the 3D rendering takes place on a remote server--a cheaper solution than buying a high-end graphics card, at least in the short term.


Square Enix and AMD are giving away indie games with new GPUs

Engadget

AMD wants to ensure you always have something unique to play with new graphics card.