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Intel Capital Leads $11.5M in Series A Funding for Hypersonix

#artificialintelligence

Intel Capital Leads $11.5M in Series A Funding for Hypersonix, an AI-Driven Autonomous Analytics Platform Founded by Former Executives from SAP, PayPal, IBM As reported today in the Wall Street Journal, Hypersonix has received $11.5M in Series A funding led by Intel Capital with participation from existing investors. Hypersonix was founded by successful serial entrepreneur and former SAP executive Prem Kiran, and is led by an impressive co-founding team, including Rama Rao, former MIT research faculty member for advanced analytics, as well as former PayPal and Intuit data executive, and Todd Michaud, a former IBM executive and former president at Retalix. Hypersonix is an autonomous analytics and decisioning platform that is transforming consumer commerce data with artificial intelligence and automation. Amazon Lab126 is among its early customers. The funding comes at a time when IDC predicts worldwide revenues for big data and business analytics (BDA) solutions to reach $274.3B by 2022.


Teradata's bet on subscriptions is paying off

ZDNet

At the opening keynote of the company's annual industry analyst summit, COO Oliver Ratzeberger displayed a chart showing share prices up almost 40% over the past year, and or almost double over that of a couple years ago. Wall Street likes the fact that Teradata's subscription business is ramping up much faster than expected, accounting for over 60% in Q1 vs. the 40 - 50% that was expected. Mind you, Teradata is pulling off this transition while remaining publicly-traded, unlike midsized software counterparts like Tibco and Informatica that felt the need to go private. Beneath the surface, Teradata has made a number of changes to its business that have facilitated the transition to subscription. Many of those pieces were announced last year.


How Big Data Can Use Language To Find The Hidden Reason To Sell A Stock

@machinelearnbot

Traders and financial professionals work at the opening bell on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). It's no secret on Wall Street that a "sell" recommendation in sell-side research reports is exceedingly rare, and it can't be chalked up to today's bull market recently surpassing its ninth birthday. According to FactSet data, only 6% of analyst recommendations on S&P 500 companies are "sell" ratings or the equivalent, lending credence to the notion that conflicts of interest persist despite reform efforts to make recommendations more objective in nature. Put simply, negative recommendations can place an analyst in the virtual penalty box when it comes to getting access to companies, and the effects are clear in a business where access is king. So, is there still use to looking through research reports to figure out which stocks are worth buying and selling?


These Three Companies Are Tops In Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Computer software giants Salesforce.com (CRM) and Microsoft (MSFT) are top software picks to prosper from artificial intelligence -- along with a much smaller company, Hortonworks (HDP) -- according to one Wall Street brokerage. "Microsoft is positioned to be the biggest beneficiary to AI in our coverage due to its cloud-computing infrastructure (Azure)," Barclays analyst Raimo Lenschow said in a note to clients. "Salesforce.com is still in the early stages of rolling out Einstein across its entire product portfolio. Hortonworks, along with its partnership with IBM (IBM), gives customers a path to manage and analyze Big Data." At a basic level, artificial intelligence is the use of computer algorithms to attempt to replicate the human ability to learn, reason and make decisions.


The Big Value of Weather Data in the Big Data Economy

@machinelearnbot

What does a computer company want with a bunch of meteorologists? A few weeks ago, IBM announced it was acquiring The Weather Company, which owns Weather.com and Weather Underground, and the Wall Street Journal reported they were paying more than $2 billion for the privilege. According to The New York Times, while The Weather Company employs many atmospheric scientists and meteorologists, nearly three-quarters of its scientists work in data and computers. The Weather Company was already storing most of its data with IBM's cloud computing platform, and now Big Blue has access to all that data, which they can now sell to other companies who need to know about the weather. The ability to reliably predict the weather has always been important, but people wrongly assume that weather data is only useful to a handful of industries, like agriculture and transportation.


The Big Value of Weather Data in the Big Data Economy

@machinelearnbot

What does a computer company want with a bunch of meteorologists? A few weeks ago, IBM announced it was acquiring The Weather Company, which owns Weather.com and Weather Underground, and the Wall Street Journal reported they were paying more than $2 billion for the privilege. According to The New York Times, while The Weather Company employs many atmospheric scientists and meteorologists, nearly three-quarters of its scientists work in data and computers. The Weather Company was already storing most of its data with IBM's cloud computing platform, and now Big Blue has access to all that data, which they can now sell to other companies who need to know about the weather. The ability to reliably predict the weather has always been important, but people wrongly assume that weather data is only useful to a handful of industries, like agriculture and transportation.


The Big Value of Weather Data in the Big Data Economy

@machinelearnbot

What does a computer company want with a bunch of meteorologists? A few weeks ago, IBM announced it was acquiring The Weather Company, which owns Weather.com and Weather Underground, and the Wall Street Journal reported they were paying more than $2 billion for the privilege. According to The New York Times, while The Weather Company employs many atmospheric scientists and meteorologists, nearly three-quarters of its scientists work in data and computers. The Weather Company was already storing most of its data with IBM's cloud computing platform, and now Big Blue has access to all that data, which they can now sell to other companies who need to know about the weather. The ability to reliably predict the weather has always been important, but people wrongly assume that weather data is only useful to a handful of industries, like agriculture and transportation.


The Big Value of Weather Data in the Big Data Economy

@machinelearnbot

What does a computer company want with a bunch of meteorologists? A few weeks ago, IBM announced it was acquiring The Weather Company, which owns Weather.com and Weather Underground, and the Wall Street Journal reported they were paying more than 2 billion for the privilege. According to The New York Times, while The Weather Company employs many atmospheric scientists and meteorologists, nearly three-quarters of its scientists work in data and computers. The Weather Company was already storing most of its data with IBM's cloud computing platform, and now Big Blue has access to all that data, which they can now sell to other companies who need to know about the weather.