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5G Could Be the Future of Concerts. No, Really

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Hip-hop artist TheHxliday is 19 years old and determined to have true creative control of his visuals as he makes his way up the music business. He's looking to a cell-phone company to achieve that. The Baltimore native, real name Noah Malik Lee, signed a deal with Motown Records last year and released his first major-label EP last week. To commemorate the occasion, he performed in a 20-minute "virtual world" hosted by Verizon on Friday (May 14th), appearing on fans' screens from an unreal landscape. Virtual effects swam around him -- but TheHxliday didn't pop up as an avatar inside a game, the way Travis Scott did with his Astroworld concert inside Fortnite, and the show wasn't meant to reproduce a concert the way Billie Eilish staged her full-length quarantine show.


The 84 biggest flops, fails, and dead dreams of the decade in tech

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The world never changes quite the way you expect. But at The Verge, we've had a front-row seat while technology has permeated every aspect of our lives over the past decade. Some of the resulting moments -- and gadgets -- arguably defined the decade and the world we live in now. But others we ate up with popcorn in hand, marveling at just how incredibly hard they flopped. This is the decade we learned that crowdfunded gadgets can be utter disasters, even if they don't outright steal your hard-earned cash. It's the decade of wearables, tablets, drones and burning batteries, and of ridiculous valuations for companies that were really good at hiding how little they actually had to offer. Here are 84 things that died hard, often hilariously, to bring us where we are today. Everyone was confused by Google's Nexus Q when it debuted in 2012, including The Verge -- which is probably why the bowling ball of a media streamer crashed and burned before it even came to market.