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'Least Desirable'? How Racial Discrimination Plays Out In Online Dating

NPR

In 2014, user data on OkCupid showed that most men on the site rated black women as less attractive than women of other races and ethnicities. That resonated with Ari Curtis, 28, and inspired her blog, Least Desirable.


The Racists of OkCupid Don't Usually Carry Tiki Torches

Slate

In the days before white supremacists descended on Charlottesville, Bumble had already been in the process of strengthening its anti-racism efforts, partly in response to an attack the Daily Stormer had waged on the company, encouraging its readers to harass the staff of Bumble in order to protest the company's public support of women's empowerment. Bumble bans any user who disrespects their customer service team, figuring that a guy who harasses women who work for Bumble would probably harass women who use Bumble. After the neo-Nazi attack, Bumble contacted the Anti-Defamation League for help identifying hate symbols and rooting out users who include them in their Bumble profiles. Now, the employees who respond to user reports have the ADL's glossary of hate symbols as a guide to telltale signs of hate-group membership, and any profile with language from the glossary will get flagged as potentially problematic. The platform has also added the Confederate flag to its list of prohibited images.


People are incensed that an elitist dating app is promoting itself with racist slurs

Mashable

An elitist, racist dating app is making waves in Singapore -- and its founder is defending it vehemently. Herbert Eng is calling his app HighBlood. It promises to filter people based on "accountant-verified information" covering income, profession, and university education. SEE ALSO: Teen creates Facebook page to spotlight immigrants' weekly achievements A week ago, it made a Facebook post advertising itself. In the text, it says the app promises "quality", and specifies that it will exclude "banglas", "maids", and "uglies."


Computers may be given 'human' rights, says professor

#artificialintelligence

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives. Imagine this coming from your iPhone: "I am, Siri, a living being with feelings. Your Mac RoboBook might one day sue you for keeping it cooped up in your dank bedroom. Your Samsung Galaxy RoboNote might take you to the International Court of Justice because you insist on keeping it in your back pocket, right next to your flaccid rump. Please, I'm not (entirely) under the spell of troubled delirium.